Branding work

  • starqueen
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 122

Post 3+ Months Ago

I didn't know where to post this, seeing as how print isn't a forum topic, but...

I was wondering if anyone has done any branding work. I was wondering what kind of file format and size you work at :? How long does it usually take you and what not?

:wink:
  • Anonymous
  • Bot
  • No Avatar
  • Posts: ?
  • Loc: Ozzuland
  • Status: Online

Post 3+ Months Ago

  • UNFLUX
  • Genius
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6376
  • Loc: twitter.com/unflux

Post 3+ Months Ago

probably best in digital art et al ;)

what program are you using? what is the project entail?
  • starqueen
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 122

Post 3+ Months Ago

naw its just a general question. lets say for stationary in general :)
  • UNFLUX
  • Genius
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6376
  • Loc: twitter.com/unflux

Post 3+ Months Ago

something like that would be best done in Illustrator or
Photosop IMO. I've done all my letterhead, biz cards, etc in
both programs and it works out great.

The only thing you need to worry about is dpi - 300dpi is best.
  • starqueen
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 122

Post 3+ Months Ago

well thats why vector is so great, no need to set a dpi since its math. i wonder though, if the logo work should be transparent, how to save the file? like if done in illustrator or photoshop...
  • digitalMedia
  • a.k.a. dM
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 5149
  • Loc: SC-USA

Post 3+ Months Ago

I think you'll find the majority of print shops like to work with EPS, while places like Kinko's encourage PDF's.

Please excuse me if this sounds stupid, but do you know how to set up the document in Illustrator? Are you doing any bleeds?
  • b_heyer
  • Web Master
  • Web Master
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 4581
  • Loc: Maryland

Post 3+ Months Ago

*blinks* branding? lets not kill any cows???
  • starqueen
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 122

Post 3+ Months Ago

harhar bheyer

dm: yes i know how to set the document up :) i def use bleeding, haha, its much easier! and how i dislike kinko's...

seems eps would be the ticket eh? hehe
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

All of the things like that I create in either Adobe InDesign, or Adobe Illustrator. I've found the printing outcome is nice and clean. Make sure you have a 5mm bleed all around - so that any artwork which goes right to the edge will not be chopped off in the printing process. For text i would recommend an inverted bleed of 3mm (not placing it within 3mm of the artboard).

Most printers accept the file as a Press Ready PDF but there are other options such as:

TIF or TIFF Supply files at 300dpi in CMYK. This format is available in Photoshop, Corel Draw and Corel Photopaint to name a few. This is the most common file format supplied as there are no font hassles to worry about.

JPG or JPEG This is like a TIF file but uses compression. The only problem is that the compression causes the file to lose detail. If you are supplying a printer with JPG files do not compress the file too much.

AI or EPS This is an Adobe Illustrator file format. This file format allows for smoother fonts and curves. However it does have some export problems from programs such as Corel Draw. If you export from Corel Draw then try and import the files again to see if it has worked. The most stable export seems to be V3. This file format also needs the fonts converted to curves before sending the file. This will stop any possible font conflicts at the printers.

PSD Photoshop document file format. This format is similar to the TIF format however keeps the layers and editable text of the photoshop document. The files are usually larger than the TIF file format.

QuarkXpress or Adobe InDesign are also usually acceptable if the printer has the same software. Generally you can convert these to Print Ready PDF's anyway.

Standard stationary sizes:
A4 Letterheads 210 x 297mm
Standard Envelopes 110x220
Business cards - Various sizes check with your printer who will tell you exact sizes


If your going to be making your own letterheads etc and printing them yourself on your printer make sure you check what size your printing margins are set at so you dont get things being chopped off.

Hope that helps,
Rose
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

(PS: Of all the printers ive dealt with most prefer press ready pdf or eps files) :)
  • digitalMedia
  • a.k.a. dM
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 5149
  • Loc: SC-USA

Post 3+ Months Ago

Hey Rose - that's a 1/8-inch bleed in the US.
:D
:P

*great info ;)
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

oh you dont use mm there? sorry bout that, ok well there is the australian standards lol

the rest of the info is still okay though :D
  • starqueen
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 122

Post 3+ Months Ago

thanx for the info! yes those stupid american measurements, lmao

good source of info you are :D
  • digitalMedia
  • a.k.a. dM
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 5149
  • Loc: SC-USA

Post 3+ Months Ago

Hey!!! I like those stupid measurements (since my brain was wired to work with that system).

LOL.
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

no comment ;)
  • DR01D
  • Expert
  • Expert
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 661
  • Loc: Australia

Post 3+ Months Ago

yeah pdfs are pretty much the format of choice now, i have supplied a number of printers pdfs and no probs, very flexible format.

best to do logos and line art graphics in illustrator (vector) for crispness, in my early days i did a fre id's using pshop for the logos etc and even at 300dpi your text will look blurry so i recommend you dont do text with pshop, unless its styled into photography or something.

size wise in illustrator you work in 1:1 so you set up the doc the actual size you want it.
  • FusionDesigner
  • Proficient
  • Proficient
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 282

Post 3+ Months Ago

What is this bleed you talk of, and how do you set this up?

Why would they prefer pdf also?
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

A bleed is the area out of the actual print area. Basically any backgrounds you should also make 5mm over the actual page size because then when its being printed there will be no white edges if the print page doesnt line up. Similarly there should be a 3mm internal bleed for text (place it 3mm inside the artwork area) so that it is not accidently chopped off in the printing and cropping process. I hope that better explains it.
  • DR01D
  • Expert
  • Expert
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 661
  • Loc: Australia

Post 3+ Months Ago

bleed is printing the ink over the edge of a page, to set this up you just basically extend the artwork around 5mm over the edge of the document in what ever app you use.

not sure exactly why pdfs technically (but mabye something with the adobe colour system matching with other gfx apps?????). practically i guess because its viewable on most pc, macs, and is outputted from a huge range of apps, and is also good for web.
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

PDFS are just generally easier for them to handle, it doesnt matter what program the file came from if they donot have that version its still no problems.

We have been using Adobe InDesign since its first release and long before the rest of the design world picked it up - so a lot of printers didnt have it - much easier to do a press ready pdf and they can still print without having the software.
  • DR01D
  • Expert
  • Expert
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 661
  • Loc: Australia

Post 3+ Months Ago

haha beat me these aussies are quik ;-)
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

naa, great minds think alike ;)
  • digitalMedia
  • a.k.a. dM
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 5149
  • Loc: SC-USA

Post 3+ Months Ago

When you print something to edge of the paper, without a border, it's known as a bleed. Like you'd see in a full page magazine advert.

Typically, if you were going to set up a print job that had 'bleeds' on all sides (known as a full bleed) you'd have guides for the following:

1. The page size itself, like 8.5" x 11". In Illustrator, I use the 'artboard' for this.

2. On the outside of the page, you'd have the extra 1/8" on all sides for the bleed. You would run all your artwork out to these lines.

3. Inside of your page, another 1/8" as a 'safe margin' You want to make sure that ALL of your content falls inside these lines to ensure that nothing gets trimmed away.

4. You'd also provide crop marks at the actual page size.

So the page gets printed beyond the bleed lines, then the printer (the person, not the machine) would come behind and trim the paper to the crop marks.

Does that make sense?
  • digitalMedia
  • a.k.a. dM
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 5149
  • Loc: SC-USA

Post 3+ Months Ago

geeeez, four posts since I started writing my reply.

LOL.
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

hahahaa :lol:
  • DR01D
  • Expert
  • Expert
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 661
  • Loc: Australia

Post 3+ Months Ago

yes......great minds...um......yeah

so is there any real technical reasons printers like/prefer pdfs???
  • digitalMedia
  • a.k.a. dM
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 5149
  • Loc: SC-USA

Post 3+ Months Ago

My understanding is that PDF tend to make for smaller, more manageable files. I still work with print shops that prefer EPS.
  • musik
  • Legend
  • Super Moderator
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 6893
  • Loc: up a tree

Post 3+ Months Ago

not really, as long as they are in the list I posted previously on the other page (same thread) they dont care. it depends on the job really and who set it up, if they know what they are doing printer only needs a PDF to print from but sometimes it can be helpful to have the AI file etc so they can tweak things if need be. Ive been working with printers for years and have seen some strange things happen to proofs when there was nothing like that on the original PDF sent :lol:
  • digitalMedia
  • a.k.a. dM
  • Genius
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 5149
  • Loc: SC-USA

Post 3+ Months Ago

^ I'd accept musik's word as the gospel on the subject. I loath print media

:lol:
  • DR01D
  • Expert
  • Expert
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 661
  • Loc: Australia

Post 3+ Months Ago

yeah sounds like she knows here stuff, i came out of print many years ago, but i do little bits here and there now.

pdfs can be edited with illustrator if the printer wishes, without changing the format
  • Anonymous
  • Bot
  • No Avatar
  • Posts: ?
  • Loc: Ozzuland
  • Status: Online

Post 3+ Months Ago

Post Information

  • Total Posts in this topic: 53 posts
  • Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests
  • You cannot post new topics in this forum
  • You cannot reply to topics in this forum
  • You cannot edit your posts in this forum
  • You cannot delete your posts in this forum
  • You cannot post attachments in this forum
 
 

© 1998-2014. Ozzu® is a registered trademark of Unmelted, LLC.