Digital art and traditional marketplace

  • sanbase
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Post 3+ Months Ago

A brief preamble, first:
I have created so-called dynamic painting, i.e. picture which are evolving with time. This is generative art, indeed, because one way or another the picture is generated by a computer. Since the picture's hardware is actually rather expensive, at the initial stage I have decided to begin with offering giclee-printed static instances of such pictures to art galleries. Suddently I was faced an opposition from the galleries, meaning, they are not interested in giclee because they only want to sell "originals". Obviously there is no paint-on-canvas initial original or so, i.o.w. I cannot present the galleries any conventional original the way they want. Actually a canvas printed picture can be sold together with a CD containing the initial digital file the picture has been printed from. In addition to that I can put a guarantee that all copies of this file are destroyed and I will never be able to make any precize copy of that. (It is simply impossible technologywise). But the galleries' owners don't accept such an approach.

So, what is the original of a digitally performed picture? Supposingly, using some fine technologies ANY classic painting can be copied up to a single molecule, then what is a difference between an original and a copy? In case of a digital file its copy is indistinguishable from an original. So, what to do in this case? Does anybody know any gallery which would accept to put digital giclee-printed pictures on exposition without requesting any "primary oil-on-canvas original"?

In the meantime take a look at a couple of images made with this technology: http://www.sanbase.com/art/samples.html . Would anybody say, these pictures are made with a computer and not by hands?
And finally, does it really matter HOW the picture was made from a buyer's point of view?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • bebsie
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Post 3+ Months Ago

sanbase wrote:
And finally, does it really matter HOW the picture was made from a buyer's point of view?


i'd say YES.
  • sanbase
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Post 3+ Months Ago

To be honest, I don't consider my pictures, masterpieces deserving museum exposition for having enormous historical value. It's rather a pretty house interior design element, instead. In this case, from my point of view there is no big difference whether it is hand made or computer built. It's impossible to distinguish any difference from a two feet distance. nd, as long as a customer wants an original, the what I call, an exclusive icture, I just destroy the master file. And I do sign my pictures, because I rint them out myself (I have Epson 9800).

In nay case the world is changing and the technology does not stuck. I for ne am pretty sure, in the future pictures in a digital shape will expand more and more, and a computer display will serve as canvas. I went even further and made pictures which evolving all the time. Once again, it is not a museum worth treasure. It is a mid-class solution, not the one for highly wealthy people. To start with, it is beautiful. But unfortunately it is not that cheap as yet, because the complete picture including an LCD display and a computer costs around $5,000. Though, hardware is getting cheaper rather quickly. But still, even now the picture's price is comparable to a cost of mid range artist's oil painting. And buying my picture, the customer gets not a single one, but millions of its variations.

As for the giclee, I can provide UNIQUE pictures in substantial quantities. It means, EVERY customer can get a unique picture, signed and certified, at a pretty low price. Quality of the works can be evaluated by visiting my site (http://www.sanbase.com/art). Do customers really need it, I don't really know. As for me, it would be enough and important to know that nobody else has got a picture being EXACTLY like mine. Maybe I am not alone in that...

Everything looks simple and clear, though I am stuck with an inertia of the conventional art market. I don't really know how to overcome that. Still, I am just an artist and not an experienced art merchant... That's why I am up here looking for advises of experienced people.
  • krismeister
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You work reminds me of Joshua Davis, he make algorithms that produce fascinating graphics.

Here is a project he did for BMW
http://z4byjd.com/index.php
He used their car to inspire his art.

In my opinion the best distribution method is to make a limited quantity of prints per work of art, then destroy the digital version.
  • sanbase
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Post 3+ Months Ago

krismeister wrote:
You work reminds me of Joshua Davis, he make algorithms that produce fascinating graphics..

To tell the truth I can not find any link between my work and Joshua Davis...
  • krismeister
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Post 3+ Months Ago

lol not about style.

Maybe I mistunderstood, when you were talking about expensive hardware needs I thought you were infering that your work was generated through mathmatical methods, which is similar to his work. But perhaps you made it in photoshop or a similar graphics program.

Also I was giving you an example of an artist who gains recognition from the fine art community dispite his work being digital.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Print 1 giclee original. Submit it to a gallery on consignment. Many galleries sale printed fine art. Look around. It might be that the particular gallery you tried just didn't like your work and they made up that excuse to let you down easy.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

bebsie wrote:
sanbase wrote:
And finally, does it really matter HOW the picture was made from a buyer's point of view?


i'd say YES.


I'd say NO. But don't expect for it to sell at the price as a hand painted original, of course. Many buyers will purchase expensive fine art prints. Limited Edition...
  • sanbase
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Post 3+ Months Ago

sanbase wrote:
To tell the truth I can not find any link between my work and Joshua Davis...

I was not right. Some works really look alike. But in my case it's a dynamic form of art but not a static one.
  • krismeister
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Post 3+ Months Ago

sanbase wrote:
dynamic form of art but not a static one.


It's animated?
  • sanbase
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Post 3+ Months Ago

krismeister wrote:
It's animated?

Yes. The images are generated in real time. One image is smoothly transformed to another one.
  • krismeister
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I see now, I found your videos. They are very cool!

I stumbeled upon a nice flash peice from adobe featuring Joshua Davis among 6 other designers/firms:

http://www.adobe.com/creativemind/?promoid=NBVQ
click enter

when it loads:
go to the green planet
click on the red flowers when they appear, turning one into a fireball
click on the cannon.
  • sanbase
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Post 3+ Months Ago

krismeister wrote:
I stumbeled upon a nice flash peice from adobe featuring Joshua Davis among 6 other designers/firms:

Excellent! I like it very much!
But as far as I understand, it is a cartoon, in other words it has been prepared and programmed in advance (like a demoscene). Isn't it?
In case of the dynamic painting the image is absolutely unpredictable. The picture living its own life.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Unfortunately Art and the basis for critique as art are completely subjective. You may be running into gallery curators who feel threatened by your means of production. They're certainly already running into competition from artists who see no need to hang their work in a gallery and simply make money off of their websites.

Just remember that your struggles aren't new. Don't think for a moment that Expressionist painters had an easy time getting their work hung by a Realist leaning art community or that Bauhaus designers didn't have a difficult time fighting the ingrained ideas of Victorian ideology. Sadly even though the institution of art goes through massive waves of style and philosophy it is one of the most reluctant to change.

All that to say I think there are several things you can do to break the mold. First I would look for galleries that are used to non-traditional works (you may not be able to sell your works from these showings but at least you will start to receive some recognition). Some corporations are willing to hang work in their lobbies, art schools are always looking for people willing to display work, the list goes on and on.

Then hold an opening for your work (even if its not in a traditional gallery) but don't invite the traditional art community. Instead, embrace the technological side of the art community. Bring in bloggers from your area, mathematicians, other digital artists, videographers and so on. These people may understand your work and move in the correct circles to publicize it.

Most of all don't give up. The phrase "Starving Artist" wouldn't exist if selling art was really easy.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

There is already one long post on this. We don't need another long one on this same topic. Use the other

http://www.ozzu.com/sutra345479.html#345479

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