Digital Camera Help

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Post 3+ Months Ago

I am looking to purchase a digital camera. I want to make sure I can take the best quality photo possible for my money. I found a 7.1 megapixel camera I really like but I want to know if 7.1 megapixels will be enough to accomplish what I want to do. So you know I want to take landscape shots at a couple of national parks in my area. My question is, will 7.1 megapixals produce the high quality image I desire?

Also, after i have taken my shots I would like to be able to print them and have them come out as close to 35mm photo quality, as possible. So, what is the minimum printing resolution (dpi) should I be looking for in a printer in order to achieve this?

Thanks in advance for all your help.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

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Post 3+ Months Ago

It's not just a question of "enough" megapixels, it's the quality of those pixels that counts.

I have a Nikon D100 Digital SLR which is 6.1MP. It produces GREAT quality shots. The Nikon D2h produces only 4.1MP images, but it's a MUCH better camera than my D100, and the images are far superior in quality. Images shot with a D2h can be interpolated to print much larger than the D100 whilst retaining the integrity of quality.

For as close to 35mm as possible you're looking at a Nikon D2x (12.4MP) which is about 5 grand, or a Canon EOS-1DS Mk2 (16.7MP) for about 8 grand (although personally I don't feel it's as good as the D2x).

Nikon D100 and D70 can both be picked up for a lil under a grand these days, and are about as entry level as you'll want to get. Anything lower quality than that I wouldn't even look at.

But, it all depends on your budget and what you want to do. Do you WANT Digital SLR? Or do you want a point-n-shoot. With a point-n-shoot, you've nothing else to buy except your media on which to store the images.

With a Digital SLR, you've got a LOT more expense. Lenses, filters, flashes, etc. That $1,000 camera body can be $5,000 worth of equipment in no time (trust me, I've been there, heh).

So, what's your budget?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Ok, now I am really confused. If the MP's don't measure picture quality how do you determine picture quality of a camera without taking a picture. I think it will be easier to give you the specs. of the camera I am looking at. Currently i am working with a budget of $400usd.

Specifications:

Imager: 7.1 megapixel effective, 7.41 megapixel gross, 1/1.8” CCD
Lens: 5.7–22.9mm (27–110mm equivalent in 35mm photography),
8 lenses in 7 group
Zoom: Seamless to 20x (4x optical and 5x digital combined)
Aperture Range: f2.8 to f11.0 (adjustable in 1/3 or 1/2 EV step)
LCD: 1.8” (4.6cm) Semi-transmissive LCD, approx. 130,000 pixel
Focus System: Dual AF (CCD: Contrast detection/Passive Sensor: Phase detection)
Focus Range: Normal mode: 31” – infinity (0.8m – infinity)
Macro mode: 8” – 31” (0.2m – 0.8m)
Super Macro Mode: 1” – 8” (.03m – 0.2m)
Focus Mode: iESP, Spot Advanced AF target Frame Control, Predictive AF, Manual
Shutter Speed: 1/4000 sec – 16 sec.
ISO: Auto, 50, 100, 200, 400 (equivalent)
Metering Mode: Digital ESP, Spot, Center Weighted
White Balance: iESP2 multi-pattern auto TTL, Pre-set (Shade, Overcast, Sunlight,
Evening Sun, Tungsten, and Fluorescent), Custom,
WB compensation +/- 7
Exposure Compensation: ±2 EV steps in 1/3 or 1/2 EV steps
Recording Modes: DCF Exif2.2, RAW, TIFF, JPEG
Adjustment Resolutions: 3072 x 2304, RAW, TIFF, SHQ, HQ, 3:2
3072 x 2048, TIFF 3:2, SHQ 3:2
2592 x 1944, TIFF, SQ1 High, Normal
2288 x 1712, TIFF, SQ1 High, Normal
2048 x 1536, TIFF, SQ1 High, Normal
1600 x 1200, TIFF, SQ2 High, Normal
1280 x 960, TIFF, SQ2 High, Normal
1024 x 768, TIFF, SQ2 High, Normal
640 x 480, TIFF, SQ2 High, Normal
Shooting Modes: 12 shooting modes; P, A, S, M, Scene Preset (Portrait, Sports,
Portrait + Landscape, Landscape, Night Scene, Underwater Wide,
Underwater Macro), Movie
Panorama: Up to 10 frames automatically stitchable with Olympus Master software
when using Olympus brand xD-Picture Card™
Custom Settings: 4 My Mode
Sequential Shooting: High-speed 3.3 fps/max 4 images in RAW or JPEG
1.7 fps/max 10 images in HQ
Shooting Edit Effects: Black and White, Sepia
Image Quality Adjustment: (Adj. ±5) sharpness, contrast, color phase
Movie Mode: QuickTime Movie with Sound, VGA 640 x 480 30fps/
x 240 30 fps/15 fps
Image Processing: TruePic TURBO™
Pixel Mapping: Automatic Pixel Mapping (APM) available via menu
Noise Reduction: Mode available at shutter speeds of 0.5 second or automatically
Image Playback: Still image: Index display 4, 9, 16, Up to 7x enlargement,
index, Histogram, Protect, Rotation,
Movie: Normal, Frame-by-frame
Playback Edit Effects: Still Image: Resize, Trimming, Red-Eye Fix, RAW data
Movie: Frame Edit, Index
Direct Printing Options: PictBridge™ and DPOF
Flash: Built-in, Pop-up
Hot Shoe: Yes, TTL
Flash Modes: Auto (for low light and backlit conditions)
Red-eye Reduction
Fill-in
Slow (1st Curtain and 1st Curtain with Red-Eye
Reduction, 2nd Curtain)
Off
Slave
Flash Working Range: Wide: 31” - 21.1ft (0.8 - 3.7m); Tele 31” - 7.2ft. (0.8 - 2.2m)
Self-timer: 12 seconds/by Remote Control; Auto, 3 seconds
Settings Memorization: On/Off (Hold changes/Reset to default settings)
Date/Time Calendar: Simultaneous recording into image data, Automatic
Removable Media Card: xD-Picture™ Card (16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512MB, or 1
Type I or Type II (up to 4GB)
Outer Connectors: USB connecter (Auto-Connect), Audio/Video, and DC
Auto-connect USB: 2.0 Full Speed
System Requirements: Windows 98/98SE, 2000 Pro/ME/XP,
Mac® OS 10.1 and higher
Operating Environment: Operation: 32° – 104°F (0° – 40°C), 30 – 90% humidity
Storage: -4° – 140°F (-20° – 60°C), 10 – 90% humidity
Power Supply: Li-Ion Rechargeable Battery (BLM-I), AC Adapter
Size: 4.6” W x 3.4” H x 2.6” D (116mm x 87mm x 65.5mm)
Weight: 13.5 oz (420g) without battery and media card
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Post 3+ Months Ago

OriginNO_II wrote:
Ok, now I am really confused. If the MP's don't measure picture quality how do you determine picture quality of a camera without taking a picture.

You can't. You go around the web and look at sample pictures.

Btw, you've just pasted a bunch of stats, but you haven't told me a thing. What is the MAKE and MODEL of the camera?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The lens and CMOS/CCD sensor are some of the key factors in the quality, but not the only ones. Each camera processes photos in a different way, and each company leans heavier on a different technology. I have a Nikon D70 and a Canon S60 (point and shoot) and they are both nice...although I haven't touched my S60 since I got my D70. The S60 is decent for about $420....4 MP, typical iffy Canon lens, but decent image processing.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Ooops, sorry, I forgot to specify Camera and model. The stats are for the Olympus C-7070. Ok, I have been to a bunch of photography sites but I have yet to find one that tells me what cameras were used to take the shot. Do eithr one of you know of a site I can visit that does such a thing. Thanks again to you both for your help.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Without even looking at it, I've never seen an Olympus digital camera that I liked. Their 35mm sure, great, my dad used an OM-1 for 30 years and it was sweet, but for digital, I don't even give them a second look any more.

I've used about a dozen different models of Olympus digital camera over the past decade or so. Right now work owns about half a dozen Olympus cameras (all different models) and they all suck.

Have a look at Nikon, Canon & Fuji point-n-shoots. If you want to see some sample photos, check http://www.steves-digicams.com

There's a whole huge load of reviews there, along with sample photos taken by those cameras.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ok, thank very much, Axe. Gretaly appreciated.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

As far as Olympus goes, they put out a great professional DSLR for studio use (E-1) but they don't have much else to offer IMHO....except the m:robe...that thing is nice!
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Grrr... I had a big long reply written out, then the whole thing disappeared (I hate windows)...

Anyways, short version of a long post...

Down with Olympus... Hail Minolta ;)

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/konicaminolta7d/
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Post 3+ Months Ago

EWW! Minolta's are crap. Bad components, poor design, lack of features.

"THe Maxxum 7D is Konica Minolta's first digital SLR for five years..." - DPR

That pretty much sums it up for me...not to mention the high price for the camera (especially considering the D70 as a competitor as DPR does). Bottom line, Kinica Minolta was, is, and always will be a 3rd world competitor....they will never sell out Sony, Kodak, Olympus, Canon, or Nikon....but maybe Casio.

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