help with lines and curves

  • Z
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Post 3+ Months Ago

hey,

i am making a new banner for a forum and i just always have trouble making perfectly curved (not wobbly) lines.... i just cant paint perfectly straight with a mouse... im new to photoshop so please explain it like i was in kindergarden.

for example...you see how in at this site in the banner at the top next to the green character there is a perfectly smooth curved line that makes everything to the rest of it darker... how do you make the lines so smooth and even?

thanks for your time,
nick
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • bleepnik
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Erm.. what green character?

To contrain your brush stroke to a straight line in Photoshop, hold down the Shift key while painting.

To create perfect curves, select the Marquee tool (M on your keyboard, the dotted line tool in the tool palette). If using your keyboard, type Shift+M to cycle through the Marquee tool options, until you get to the elliptical Marquee tool. If using your mouse, click-and-hold to until the options appear and then select the appropriate tool.

So. Now you have the elliptical Marquee tool selected. Draw your ellipse by clicking and dragging your mouse. Want to constrain the shape to a perfect circle? Hold down the Shift key while dragging.

When you're happy with your shape, click on Edit > Stroke (I think, I don't have Photoshop running at the moment), and select the pixel width of the stroke; whether you want it inside your shape, outside it, or centred on the line; and its colour. Click OK.

Now you have a nice ellipse or circle. Great. Now either use the eraser to delete what you don't want from the shape; or, if you want a more precise cut, use the Marquee tool again to draw a selection that covers the part you want to erase and hit Delete.

Ta da. Perfect curve.

You can also use paths, but this is likely easier for simple applications.

Hth,
Gita
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I'd recommend getting to grips with paths; you'll have much more flexibility and freedom.

You'd need to use the fountain pen tool - take a look at help, searching for paths.
  • SB
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I was just working away reading JustG's post there and everything you said is 100% correct (not that i ever doubted it). The interesting thing is, i was unaware of the "Stroke" tool and what it did, so naturally i was quite curious as to what it could do to the image that just leaving it with the curves didn't.

I used it and came up with this graphic...

Image

There is no purpose to this graphic other than me just testing out Photoshop CS2 as i have recently just installed it and i was quite interested in playing about.

Just so you know, in order for me to have two curves in one what i did was when i made my first curve using just the Marquee tool i then pressed Shift and created another circle. Once you have selected the right place and shape of the second circle and click off it then will display your new shape merged into one. It's pretty cool!
  • Impel GD
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The problem with that method arises when you need to create sweeping curves.

It's also pixel-based as opposed to vector-based, restricting any scaling and other transformations you may need to do after creation.
  • bleepnik
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Impel's right. For serious use, and for efficient reuse (i.e., no wasted work), paths are the way to go. But for a one-off, a small banner etc., I reckon the method I outlined would be okay. Best thing, of course, is to try it and see for yourself. =]

And SB, while Shift adds to your selection, Alt subtracts from it. Very easy to get, for example, a crescent moon shape that way. Marquee tool, draw circle, hold down Alt, draw an overlapping circle, and voila, a marquee moon. Just in case you hadn't discovered that on your own yet. =]

- Gita

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