PNG Interlaced?

  • Bogey
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have an Image I created in photoshop and I want to save it as a PNG as it has transparencies in it and when I click to save it, it has an option for interlacing... None or Interlaced.

What does it mean if it's interlaced or not? Any help?

- Thanks :)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • joebert
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It's similar to making JPEG images progressive.

http://nuwen.net/png.html

Clicking the scroll track of your browsers scrollbar two to three times should get you to the interlacing section.
  • Bogey
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Oh goodness... thans joebert that was GREAT INFO there :)
  • Bogey
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Alright, thanks pakistanboy.

I use save for web option when I save a template sliced or not. Not for regular images though...

Which way is better?
  • Snow is on Fire
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Unless I'm saving my images as a PSD I always use the save for web option. It makes it easier to customize images specifically for the web.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Interlace is a technique of improving the picture quality of a video signal primarily on CRT devices without consuming extra bandwidth. Interlacing causes problems on certain display devices such as LCDs[1]. It was invented by RCA engineer Randall C. Ballard in 1932,[2][3] and first demonstrated in 1934, as cathode ray tube screens became brighter, increasing the level of flicker caused by progressive (sequential) scanning.[4] It was ubiquitous in television until the 1970s, when the needs of computer monitors resulted in the reintroduction of progressive scan. Interlace is still used for most standard definition TVs, and the 1080i HDTV broadcast standard, but not for LCD, micromirror (DLP), or plasma displays; these displays do not use a raster scan to create an image, and so cannot benefit from interlacing: in practice, they have to be driven with a progressive scan signal. The deinterlacing circuitry to get progressive scan from a normal interlaced broadcast television signal can add to the cost of a television set using such displays. Currently, progressive displays dominate the HDTV market.

Interlaced scan refers to one of two common methods for "painting" a video image on an electronic display screen (the second is progressive scan) by scanning or displaying each line or row of pixels. This technique uses two fields to create a frame. One field contains all the odd lines in the image, the other contains all the even lines of the image. A PAL based television display, for example, scans 50 fields every second (25 odd and 25 even). The two sets of 25 fields work together to create a full frame every 1/25th of a second, resulting in a display of 25 frames per second.
<<Wikipedia>>



so, interlaced is good for old crt monitors and traditional televisions,
progressive ('none') has a better result on screens that dont use a Cathode ray tube.

interlaced video has a crappy result on crystal and other non Cathode ray tube based screens. don't now if this goes visa versa.

0.4sec to look it up ;)

grtz

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