Scanning Imagery

  • Byrddog
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Okay I'm attempting to unveil my creative side lately so I've made a few sketches, some on legal pads, some on printer paper, some on composition/notebook paper, yo uname it i've got it.

So the real issue now is that I would like to scan them in and make the lines crisper. What exactly do I do. If you don't feel like explaining, a link to a tut would be fine, thats all I'm really looking for right now.

Thanks.
  • Anonymous
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I'll be hosting Byrddog's images for him. Here's his sketch.

Image

My suggestion is to recreate this in a vector package like Illustrator. You can use the scan of the sketch and trace around it.

I always perfer to keep as much artwork in a vector format as possible. The artwork will be much more versatile, now and in the future.
  • spazz
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hey Birddog, maybe this will help. Basic scanning principles are:

1) Think about what your final output will be and scan with that in mind. For example, do you want to end up with line art, in which case vector output would be best, or grayscale continuous tone or color continuous tone such as photograph, in which case your final output will be a raster image.

2) Set the scanner for the appropriate Image Type; line art, black and white or grayscale, or color.

3) If you plan to edit the scanned image, disable Unsharp Mask or sharpening features. They limt your options later on, it's better to start with a 'raw' image and make adjustments in your graphics program.
4) Unless you have memory restrictions, set the scan resolution to the optical resolution of your scanner. Enlarging, zooming and higher-than-optical resolution increases pixelation and reduces sharpness, as well as increases scan times as the scanner software performs its 'optimizaton'. If you elect to use a resolution setting other than the optical resolution of the scanner, use even multiples of the optical resolution. For example, if your scanner's optical resolution is 600, use 300 or 1200 etc. The scanner doesn't have to work as hard to come up with the calcuations.

5) Try to save your files in uncompressed format such as TIFF. Once you have your image edited you can then resize and save as an optimized image. It's always a good idea to save versions as you progress along with your editing, again in uncompressed format. You can always discard any versions you no longer use.

Hope this helps.
  • spazz
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I had Streamline and Illustrator open so I did a quick convert and resize so he could see how vector looks. Didn't mean to step on your toes, digitalMedia. Just had some free time on my hands.

Nice dragon Byrddog!
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v127/ ... nverte.jpg
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

spazz wrote:
Didn't mean to step on your toes, digitalMedia.


No worries at all spazz! :D

btw: Please don't post images inline if they are over 600px in their longest dimension. ;)
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I think spazz offers a good method. I've personally loved Streamline when I've used it.

However, I think my method is going to offer some advantages.

I took Byrddog's image and traced it in Illustrator. It took 2 or 3 minutes to place all my anchor points, and about 10-15 minutes to adjust the Bezier controls where I wanted them.

This is what I came up with:
Image

The advantages are that my objects are simple paths with a standard stroke applied. This makes it a lot easier to tweak and it can also be reused more easily down the road. Also, using my method means I have control over how many anchor points I'm using, which is a benefit when the paths are being edited.
  • spazz
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Nice work digitalMedia, and in only 10-15 minutes? I'm afraid I'm not there yet. I still struggle with the pen tool. I usually take the time to delete some points after using Streamline and then tweaking.

Sorry about the image size :oops:
  • Byrddog
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Post 3+ Months Ago

wow I have to say that I am really impressed with the stuff people have responded with especially dM's amazing convert. I guess I'm gonna have to get illustrator or some such program and try and work one of those myself... ;p


All in good fun, next step is going to be the detail work and filling in that Dragon, once i get a finalized vector image, I'll start a new post to get the dragons texture and detail work done. Keep the great tips and suggestions coming thats what these posts are for.
  • Byrddog
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Post 3+ Months Ago

MAN lol. I just spent the last 15 minutes staring at dM's picture and I don't know how the heck i'm gonna manage that lol! and in 15 minutes !!!! its gonna take me hours but thats what it takes to learn this stuff and thats what i'm gonna do.

But first step for me looks like I'm gonna have to ask my friend to borrow his copy of Illustrator.

ooh and btw whats Streamline?
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

:D

15 minutes is what I can do after using Illustrator for 8 years. I don't know if you would want to hold yourself to that until you've gotten a little practice.

Acutally, I've started writing a tutorial on work with Bezier lines, I hope to have it done by this weekend. As I see it, these tools are some of the most enigmatic to new vector artists. Master them makes a world of difference.

Adobe Streamline lets you convert raster images into vector ones. It's very useful and powerful, but does have some limitations.
  • spazz
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Post 3+ Months Ago

digitalMedia, I look forward to your tutorial on bezier curves. I have tried some online tutorials but still struggle with where to place anchor points and how many I should use to get the shape I want. I imagine those are the most common problems when learning to use the pen tool. Any help would be very much appreciated!

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