Getting new clients?

  • CE/ Pyrocy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

So I recently have become a freelance artist/webmaster/ film editor...

I moved to a different state after my last job doing film editing in California. And I'm trying to start up my own thing where I can just work from home doing flash web design, film editing, special fx, etc. My questions are:

How do you promote yourself to attract clients?... is it all word of mouth or how do you do it. Wat works well so that i don't have to be worried about the next month of income flow?

Thanks guys
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The first thing I would do is print some business cards and distribute them. You can print fliers as well. Then look into some paid advertising but I would use the Yellow Pages or anything like that.
I'm sure you already have a web site.
  • Merlyn
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Ya, the way to start off I would say would be to inform EVERYONE you know, and then start looking into some sort of local advertising like the ones mentioned above.
  • gilbertimlay
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hey!

CE/ Pyrocy, you adopting gud way to advertising by this you getting new clients. you can start at local stage.

my best wishes with you.
  • CE/ Pyrocy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Wat do you guys think about gettin a rear window sticker. and some side stickers for my truck?

does yellow pages actually work?
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Yellow pages cost too much. It's not worth it, at least not yet. A sticker on your truck is ok. However, in some places a sign on a vehicle changes the vehicle status to commercial instead of private, adding restrictions to it. Check that first.
  • dyefade
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Also consider, I don't know about your area, but I wouldn't associate a decal on a truck with the web. In fact I might be wary of it.
Like I say though, this is likely to be a "local differences" thing.
  • jameson5555
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Like don2007 said, business cards help a lot. Your best bet is word of mouth, so let everyone you meet know what you do and give them a card. It's amazing how many people you talk to will want to get something done, or have a friend who does.

Also, make sure you have a good looking site you can refer them to, so they can be impressed :)
  • matt@aylist
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Word of mouth is a great way! You can’t beat a good referral from a job well done from a previous client.

But I would have to agree on getting some nice business cards made up and ask to leave them about in some shops and restaurants most people are happy to pop them by their till if they look good.
  • ehandbury
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You must begin to set yourself up as an expert. You need to write articles, setup seminars, present at related events, etc...

... anything to start people thinking that you are the one to use for this particular requirement.
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Congratulations!

You are now in charge of your destiny. You're at the helm. You have the power!

Which is all a nice way of saying that, in addition to being the product, you are now responsible for managing, selling, marketing, billing and accounting. Yay!

You've just adopted, a second full-time job. :D

--

The most effective way of marketing yourself is to socialize and get to know people - as many as you can. There is NO form of marketing that is more effective than being able to shake some one's hand and talk to them one on one. When I say socialize, I mean in social settings, not business settings (bars/clubs/pubs, church, PTO Meetings, the grocery store, etc.).

The more relationships you develop, the more likely it is that work will find you.

Have professional/credible looking business cards, but don't go nuts over them. A business card has a very finite purpose in this world - the delivery of contact information. In the end, people don't make business decisions based on business cards...unless you're selling yourself as a business card designer, of course. :P

Also, don't call yourself a "freelance artist/webmaster/film editor". Do what I do, call yourself a "multimedia developer". I think it's better not to pigeon hole yourself.
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Freelance can be a good thing too. A freelancer can give better prices since he has lower overhead. A multimedia developer sounds like it's going to cost a lot. How about a Freelance Multimedia Developer?
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Don2007 wrote:
Freelance can be a good thing too. A freelancer can give better prices since he has lower overhead. A multimedia developer sounds like it's going to cost a lot. How about a Freelance Multimedia Developer?


Personally, I wouldn't touch the word freelance. To a prospective client it can indicate a lack of a support structure and, therefore, a lack of stability. I would also shy away from anyone who's primary decision matrix is "on the cheap".
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I get a lot of jobs because I'm willing to charge a little less. It's getting to the point where people count the money they save in gallons of gas, not in dollars. They are also postponing jobs that they want done due to the squeeze. If I come across as someone who eases the squeeze, it's better for me.
  • ehandbury
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Beware of being the lowest-cost... because someone will always come in lower and then you are in a death spiral.

The best approach is to price on value, then it doesn't matter about costs. I once charged $4,000 for an hour change. The client only knew that the change would be worth alot to them... they didn't know (or care) how long it took.
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If someone is going to charge less than I do, they can have the job, I don't want it. That's when I walk away. In fact, I tell people, if you want a lower price, go to the corner where the day workers are and hire them.

When I had lost my job in 2000 and after unemployment ended, I became a day worker for some years until I was able to work on my own. I know exactly where my pricing should be, higher than them and lower than the others.
  • joebert
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Post 3+ Months Ago

As much as it sucks, Don has a point about charging less. At least in America when you're starting out, with the economy the way it is right now.

Quote:
Wat do you guys think about gettin a rear window sticker. and some side stickers for my truck?


Only if you don't drive like a prick.

I worked with a guy who had his phone number all over his truck & the rest of us used to joke about the office getting more calls complaining about the way he drives than for putting him to work.
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

joebert wrote:
As much as it sucks, Don has a point about charging less. At least in America when you're starting out, with the economy the way it is right now.


I respectfully disagree, sir. :)

I think it's too easy to slip into a cycle of playing catch up when you start devaluing your services. What happens when the client comes back for more work at the same price?

I've said it before, and I believe it, the only difference between a $2,000 job and $10,000 job is $8,000. That's the ONLY difference. Otherwise it will be the exact same amount of work.

The people willing to pay $10,000 will be more informed and easier to work for, IMO. They're willing to pay more, because they want a professional service provider to fill a need of theirs. They want to know what they're getting before they get it and they're willing to pay for it. If you do a good job, you'll get more work.

The people willing to pay only $2,000 aren't likely be repeat customers. I think constantly trying to edge out competitors with price, to get clients on-the-hook, is a bad idea, personally.

...but I still worship the joebert. :lol:
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If the $2,000 job and the $10,000 are the same amount of work, does that mean that you have a one price fits all system?
  • ehandbury
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Post 3+ Months Ago

People write PhDs on pricing so its hard to boil-it-down into a couple of sentences.
Its certainly better to have 1 client paying $10,000 than 5 clients paying $2,000... however, if the 1 $10,000 client leaves then you're in trouble. Of course, its best to have 5 $10,000 clients!!!
I guess what I am saying is try to get out of talking about time or work as a factor in pricing. Listen to your customers and try to understand the value and urgency that they want a solution. Base your pricing on that...
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Don2007 wrote:
If the $2,000 job and the $10,000 are the same amount of work, does that mean that you have a one price fits all system?


Yes, I charge what I charge and I don't tailor prices. I know how much my time is worth to me and the client - and I know how much the prices can vary across the industry. However, I also don't do one-off contract work. When someone hires me, I get put on their payroll. ;) That way, I only need to have one client every few years and I save a great deal of money and time because basic business support is handeled by the company.

If they want to hire their sister's husband's mom's neighbor's nephew whose about the graduate from high school and is regarded as a "computer whiz" because he's only going to charge $500, I'm happy to walk away...they'll call back.

I'd still like to reiterate my main point, though, that you have to socialize to get new, worthwhile clients. Equally important is maintaining and nurturing relationships with people. Most good work goes to someone who is known and trusted, not the lowest bidder.

IMO, as always.
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Time and work determine value and therefore they have to be a factor in the pricing.
  • joebert
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I agree with you for the most part dM, but I don't think it applies to the people just starting out.

When you're just starting out you don't have the experience it takes to tell clients, "between $xx-$xxx in May", when they ask about the price of tea in China.

When it comes to the economy, the established firms are the ones being given the majority of the work available because of seniority. Making it harder for the ones starting out.

The only realistic option for someone starting out, is to swallow their pride in order to get their foot in the door. If you do good work, any client worth having would be happy to pay reasonable prices to keep you around, right ?


I don't remember where I heard this, but it made sense to me. :D
Quote:
Everything is worth exactly what its' purchaser is willing to pay for it.


I actually hate working out the numbers myself, I much rather hear what they have to work with and come up with a product based on that.
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

joebert wrote:
I agree with you for the most part dM, but I don't think it applies to the people just starting out.

When you're just starting out you don't have the experience it takes to tell clients, "between $xx-$xxx in May", when they ask about the price of tea in China.


You know, that's a really good point. I've been doing this, successfully, for over a decade. I guess it would be tremendously different if I were just starting out. :thumbsup:

Don2007 wrote:
Time and work determine value and therefore they have to be a factor in the pricing.


You may be right, friend, but I've yet to encounter a project, of any kind, where the hours of work can be dertermined with accuracy ahead of time.
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
Everything is worth exactly what its' purchaser is willing to pay for it.

There is another way to say that.

All prices are imaginary until the sale actually takes place.
  • joebert
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
You may be right, friend, but I've yet to encounter a project, of any kind, where the hours of work can be dertermined with accuracy ahead of time.


That's a major factor in why I hate working with the numbers.
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Calculating the time a job will take comes with experience.

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