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Total votes : 36

How big should 1K and 1M be?

  •  
    1K = 1024 bytes, 1M = 1024x1024 bytes
  •  
    1K = 1000 bytes, 1M = 1000x1000 bytes
  •  
    1K = 1024 bytes, 1M = 1024x1000 bytes

GB= how many MB?

  • Bigwebmaster
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I was curious to what you guys think 1 Kilobyte and 1 megabyte is equal to. I am finding mixed results that say

1K = 1024 bytes, 1M = 1024x1024 bytes
1K = 1000 bytes, 1M = 1000x1000 bytes
1K = 1024 bytes, 1M = 1024x1000 bytes

Please vote above and if you have a good answer for this please explain.
  • Anonymous
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • b_heyer
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I think it depends on what you are talking about. I just realized I may have voted wrong, but I know that ram is 1meg= 1024 KB

But I am not sure what 1kb equals...
  • Borrow -A- Geek
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Post 3+ Months Ago

kilo in scientific terms means 1000 or kilo meaning thousand. however in the computer world, there are 8 bits to a byte and 128 bytes to a Kilo Byte. one byte is approxamately the storage required for one character (e.g. the letter A = 8 bits, or one BYTE). and a kilobyte is measured in terms of 128 bytes (8x128 Bytes=1024 Bytes or 1 Kilo Byte. the only time it is used as a rounded 1000 is when it is rounded for convenience, or easier computing of numbers.

so 8x128 = 1024
and 1024 x 1024 = 1048576 etc etc

so it is not 1000 in terms of bandwidth or disk space in my opinion


  • Cuerock
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Post 3+ Months Ago

8 bits equal 1 byte, and 1,024 bytes equal 1 kilobyte, and 1,024 kilobytes equal one megabyte

I GOT ONE RIGHT!!!!!!!! :D :D :D :D :D

This is true says my college books....
  • ATNO/TW
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Nice to see Gadget Guru in the post. And After reading that...that's just like I remember being taught it...exactly.
  • Alan2
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ever since I started working with my Spectrum 48K I have known exactly what a Kilo Byte was.

Upon getting a PC I already knew the 1Kb = 1024 Bytes 1Mb = 1024 KB and 1GB = 1024 MB 1TB = 1024 GB

soo in the computer world we tend to follow the 1024 standard.

which it when you give a file size in bytes people say it's different sizes.

I say 100Mb in bytes, someone else says 1002.4Mb.


I think it mainly people taking the K as Kilo aka 1000. :)
  • UNFLUX
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ditto here as well --
1K = 1024 bytes, 1M = 1024x1024 bytes
  • Dragoris
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Post 3+ Months Ago

gadget explains it well. math is math, but computer math is its own kind sometimes

1K = 1024 bytes, 1M = 1024x1024 bytes
  • Shadow Knight
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ok I have been wondering
how many MB there are in 4 GB?

thank you
  • gba_m
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Post 3+ Months Ago

i think you mistype mg, it should be mb

1024 MB = 1GB
1024 * 4 = 4096MB
  • Axe
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It depends who you talk to, but..

4GB == 4,000,000,000 Bytes or 4,000MB (if you speak to hard drive manufacturers).

4GB == 4,294,967,296 Bytes or 4,096MB (1024x1024x1024x4 if you go by the numbers).

Hard Drive manufacturers use an even 0 number to basically make their hard drives sound larger than they really are. Which is why a 17.4Gig (using 1000x1000x1000) drive always formats to about 16.2Gig (1024x1024x1024).
  • b_heyer
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I am not understanding you're last statement about why they format down. If you do this 1000^3 you get a smaller number then 1024^3, so how could the said 17.4 gig computer format to a smaller ammount, if you multiply a larger number.

Maybe you just restated this wrong. I am going to *attempt* to merge this with another post...we'll see.
  • b_heyer
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Well methinks I did it backwards...but it worked.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

They format it down, because...

17400000000 bytes / 1000 / 1000 / 1000 == 17.4Gig, oooh a nice big hard drive.

17400000000 bytes / 1024 / 1024 / 1024 == 16.2Gig, doesn't sound so impressive now huh? :)

So, hard drive companies use 1Gig = 1000*1000*1000 to make their hard drives sound bigger than they actually are, and use the "kilo means thousand" argument to get away with it. I'm sure kilo would also mean thousand in the sense of hard drives too if 2 was an even root of it.

2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024 <-- This is why it's 1024 and not 1000 in computer speak.
  • b_heyer
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Oooooh ok you're starting with the 17.4.

Gotcha!

Yes and I realize the whole thing of roots of two. I think in certain circumstances it is just easier to talk about hard drives as 120 gig instead of *calculates* "Oh it's a 111.75 gigabyte hard drvie". I can understand the root of two for memory, you normally don't get huge ammounts (the layperson), but with hard drives these day's tis' easier to just give out nice round numbers.
  • Axe
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Oh yeah, for general ease of use in daily language, sure, rounding off is much easier..

But I was SO gutted after upgrading from a 260Meg HD to a "540Meg", and seeing it only format to like 503Meg (man, that was over 10 years ago, lol).
  • z3ro_man
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Dude that's so gay when you get numbers like 20GB Hard Drive but it's actually 20000/1024=19.53125 and what mine shows is 18.x
I mean c'mon a HD advertised as 20GB on Dell's website when I checked the size upon receiving the computer it was 18.x close to 19GB THAT'S WAY LESS THEN THE 20GB ADVERTISED. THAT PISSES ME OFF SO BAD I'd rather have them say it's 19.5 GB then tell me it's 20GB :evil:
  • Axe
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You brought up a 6 month old dead thread to say that?
  • enriya
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Post 3+ Months Ago

how many megabytes are there in one gigibyte?
  • enriya
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Post 3+ Months Ago

how many megabytes are in one gigibyte?
  • MISC/A++
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Post 3+ Months Ago

1024 megabytes

//Edit, I just saw this post :roll: , http://www.ozzu.com/general-discussion/how-many-t20413.html
  • enriya
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Post 3+ Months Ago

thanks
  • MISC/A++
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Post 3+ Months Ago

enriya wrote:
thanks


:wink: np.
  • UniquelyYoursPC
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Post 3+ Months Ago

it is like google's gmail they tell you 2 GB but you get more then that if you look at the fotter of your mail

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