Nasa Confirms Water on Mars

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http://news.cnet.com/2300-11397_3-62446 ... &subj=news

Quote:
NASA announced that laboratory tests aboard the Phoenix Mars Lander have proven that water exists on Mars. No organic compounds have been identified but NASA hasn't given up hope.


Image

Quote:
These two photos, taken four days apart, show ice has disappeared due to a process similar to evaporation. Note the lumps in the lower left of the trench in the photo on the left are not seen in the photo on the right.


Thats a start, they were already fairly sure water did exist there anyway. Now when and if they discover life on Mars that would be very big news as it would completely re-shape how we view our universe.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

In other NASA news, they also discovered liquid on Saturn's moon Titan.

http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/ ... 31,00.html

It isn't water but ethane and methane.

Larry Soderblom, a scientist with the US Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona wrote:
Detection of liquid ethane confirms a long-held idea that lakes and seas filled with methane and ethane exist on Titan.
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hey that's cool ... Someday soon we'll be able to go to mars and live there in some big-ass dome or something ...
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And how about NASAtv broadcasting the total solar eclipse all day today, thats cool too.
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NASAtv ... ? wow, first time I've seen that ... did a quick google ...
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They have a 24 hour television web cast, its even on some satellite and cable providers. Its cool because they have total coverage of all the shuttle missions and big events at the space station, as well as normal scheduled programming. Dangit though, I block that at my firewall at work so that people in my office will actually work instead of goof off all day like I am right now on ozzu. Maybe I can open it up for a few hours....
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hehe, nice ... maybe if they explore further on mars they'll find an ice cream parlor ... that would be SOOO cool ... I wish I had my own shuttle that I could send up and plant some things there for NASA to "discover" and make them get really confused.
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This is great! These Mars missions have been incredibly successful.

I find it incomprehensible that there wouldn't be some form of life somewhere else in the universe. Even if it were just microbes or only a few photosynthesizing cells. Maybe not on Mars or within our solar system, but somewhere.
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digitalMedia wrote:
I find it incomprehensible that there wouldn't be some form of life somewhere else in the universe. Even if it were just microbes or only a few photosynthesizing cells. Maybe not on Mars or within our solar system, but somewhere.

Ditto.
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righteous_trespasser wrote:
I wish I had my own shuttle that I could send up and plant some things there for NASA to "discover" and make them get really confused.


I just want to feel what it is like to have no gravity. A few weeks ago I canoed the Dismal River here in Nebraska, and along the way there is this big huge spring that has enough water coming up that you stay very boyant (spelling?). I think floating in that spring is probably pretty close to floating in space without gravity.
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righteous_trespasser wrote:
I wish I had my own shuttle that I could send up and plant some things there for NASA to "discover" and make them get really confused.

"Sir, we think we've found something here."

"What is it, Johnson?"

"Well sir, it... it appears to be a six-pack."
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digitalMedia wrote:
I find it incomprehensible that there wouldn't be some form of life somewhere else in the universe. Even if it were just microbes or only a few photosynthesizing cells. Maybe not on Mars or within our solar system, but somewhere.


I agree, that would be an awful waste of space if there wasn't any life.

Finding life on Mars could prove that it is much more common in our universe though, which could change how we view many things from science to religion.
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if there is traces of water, than there is a very good chance there still is NO LIFE ON MARS or EVER WAS.

The earth was around for 10 billion years before water grew life... Mars might have had water on its way to its current position in our solar system. However, that journey wouldn't stay in acceptable conditions long enough to let life grow.

Sorry, no aliens in this solar system. Unless life figured out a way to live in super cold temps or super hot temps (highly unlikely)
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Maybe not this solar system, but probably else where.

Drake Equation
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And besides, the Phoenix mission is not to find life on mars, but rather to find remnants of life on mars. Scientists already know that currently mars can't handle life without living in a biodome or something, but they speculate that years and years and eons ago mars could have supported life.
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eautocad wrote:
if there is traces of water, than there is a very good chance there still is NO LIFE ON MARS or EVER WAS.

The earth was around for 10 billion years before water grew life... Mars might have had water on its way to its current position in our solar system. However, that journey wouldn't stay in acceptable conditions long enough to let life grow.

Sorry, no aliens in this solar system. Unless life figured out a way to live in super cold temps or super hot temps (highly unlikely)

There are dozens of species capable of living within extreme temperatures and conditions, such as bacteria and microbes that live on the surface of undersea geothermal vents. Some live by producing energy from hydrogen sulfide, a compound that essentially kills most other lifeforms.

Just because a place can't sustain life for "most" species doesn't eliminate the chance of something at all living there. ;)
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Well said Mister Spork, Moderator, Esquire.
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Thats a good point, I didn't take amoeba and other single celled organisms into consideration. But would the time in transition, to where mars currently resides, be long enough to support this growth? It took a while before life started on earth, even though variables suggested it...

To think about....
With out granite, humans wouldn't be here. Next time you curse your granite counter for smacking your elbow, be appreciative you have an elbow. Granite was the first hardest surface to repel the tough water motion from the sea, long enough to "continents" to form. W/o granite, you probably wouldn't have adapted to land forming that elbow. :mrgreen:

Thanks history chanel! You can download them on Xbox live, I highly recommend doing this because you can watch it over and over again.

:D It's nice to talk about something else besides internet marketing.
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If they find evidence of life as we know it previously existing on Mars, I think it would mean either

  1. The planets are slowly venturing away from the sun
  2. The sun is getting smaller

In scenario A that would mean there's a sweet spot around the sun where the temp is just right to sustain life & our continued existance depends on how quick the second rock from the sun were to move into the sweetspot.

In scenario B that would mean we're doomed unless we develop the ability to travel and live in space.

Given the nature of stars burning out, I'm more inclined to believe the latter.
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Quote:
1. The planets are slowly venturing away from the sun
2. The sun is getting smaller


As far as I understand it, you are right on both counts. They are currently accepted theories (amongst many).

An update, apparently more news to follow;

http://www.universetoday.com/2008/08/02 ... /?hl-en=n3
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Bigwebmaster wrote:
Thats a start, they were already fairly sure water did exist there anyway. Now when and if they discover life on Mars that would be very big news as it would completely re-shape how we view our universe.


It wouldn't really re-shape how we look at our universe. It will only reshape stupid religious people think. Actually religious people don't think so...

Intellegent people were already aware the earth was not flat, and was not the center of the universe.
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Quote:
[the earth] was not the center of the universe


It will never be possible to prove that as it would require being able to observe from outside of the universe, which is not possible.
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I think he means that the earth rotates around the sun and not the sun rotating around the earth... I'm sure the earth rotates around the sun.

Water on Mars may be the cleanest (life-free) in the whole universe...

What is Pluto made up of?
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It's entirely possible for the sun, and the entire universe, to be orbiting the earth.
You can't be sure unless you're able to observe the universe from outside of the universe, which you can't do.

It's not possible to prove, nor disprove that the earth is at the center of the universe. :)
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Yes, but you can prove that religious people are stupid.
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camperjohn wrote:
Bigwebmaster wrote:
Thats a start, they were already fairly sure water did exist there anyway. Now when and if they discover life on Mars that would be very big news as it would completely re-shape how we view our universe.


It wouldn't really re-shape how we look at our universe. It will only reshape stupid religious people think. Actually religious people don't think so...


Well I disagree. At the moment scientists really do not know how often life occurs throughout the universe. There is no proof that life exists anywhere but on Earth, but they have a good idea it does exist, just not how often. If life were to exist on Mars it would prove to scientists that life probably occurs very often throughout the universe. If scientists cannot find life anywhere in our solar system but Earth it could indicate that life may exist elsewhere, just not very often and probably only on Earth-like planets. So in other words life would be extremely rare. These two ideas in my opinion can completely reshape how we view our universe and how research is done in the future.
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joebert wrote:
It's entirely possible for the sun, and the entire universe, to be orbiting the earth.


They have already proven that the sun and Earth orbit each other. The sun and Earth orbit the center of gravity of everything in our solar system in fact. Since the sun has so much more mass than anything else in our solar system though, the center of gravity is very close to the sun. This is actually known as the barycenter and is the center of gravity where two celestial bodies orbit each other. The distance does play a role in this calculation too, its very similiar to a seesaw, where someone heavy could sit on one end, and if a little kid sits far enough on the other end he could lift the heavy person.

Image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Center_of_mass

The same thing happens with our moon (Luna) and the Earth and everything else out there that exists.
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righteous_trespasser wrote:
hey that's cool ... Someday soon we'll be able to go to mars and live there in some big-ass dome or something ...


If the world was created by the "Big Bang Theory" chances are, that another planet with our exact specifications to sustain "human life" are improbable. Water simple is not enough, we are not fish. Plus, it must have a neutral ph balance to be drinkable. And really, it's no big deal to find water and/or ice other than on Earth. It's no secret it exist else where. They know it's in comets, on moons, in the rings of Saturn. So, is there life in those places? It's NASA *plum*, dont fall for it.

If the world was created by god, than, we know there is no human life elsewhere and still Earth is the only place we will ever be able to live like we do here.
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Bigwebmaster wrote:
joebert wrote:
It's entirely possible for the sun, and the entire universe, to be orbiting the earth.


They have already proven that the sun and Earth orbit each other. The sun and Earth orbit the center of gravity of everything in our solar system in fact. Since the sun has so much more mass than anything else in our solar system though, the center of gravity is very close to the sun. This is actually known as the barycenter and is the center of gravity where two celestial bodies orbit each other. The distance does play a role in this calculation too, its very similiar to a seesaw, where someone heavy could sit on one end, and if a little kid sits far enough on the other end he could lift the heavy person.

Image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Center_of_mass

The same thing happens with our moon (Luna) and the Earth and everything else out there that exists.


If I turn my monitor the same speed as that image, it looks like the smaller dot is being orbited by everything else. Untill I was able to observe from outside of my monitor (the universe) I would never have known that. :)

I think that's what quantum physics means when it says that observing a point in space alters its' path, or something like that.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Finding Ice isn't the problem, It's finding Ice made of Water. Ice can be made by all sorts of things that can't sustain life (at least as we know it).

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