Putting Metal in the Microwave

  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hey! This is my first real post here. I actually had a serious question to ask when i signed up ,but once I had signed up I forgot what my question was.

So, I will post this question:

Everyone knows that you CANNOT, ever, under any circumstances, put metal stuffs in the microwave....

Everyone agree with me? The microwave goes all screwwy.

Nnow go have a quick look inside your microwave - what is it made of?

This has been hurty my poor little mind for some weeks now and is starting to make me feel paranoid. Does anyone have an explanation for this - or at least an interesting conspiracy theory?
  • Anonymous
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • webmastery
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Post 3+ Months Ago

There's different kinds of metal. Keep that in mind :shock:
  • Tone2k11
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have always thought that you can not put any thing in the microwave that is reflective?

I have never seen a microwave with shiney metal in it, just painted metal?

I spose it makes sense that if you put shiney things in there its gonna reflect and muck it up?
  • Cool#9
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Go read and enjoy! :wink:
http://www.ic.sunysb.edu/Stu/gdepasqu/
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

hmmmm, that article doesn't really help in my quest for electromagnetic enlightenment.

yes it says that metal in the microwave is a nono (because it reflects), but that the walls are made of metal (because they reflect)....
No differentiation betwixt the two.


also i would advise anyone reading that article to be wary of certain information it contains. I found the following errors scanning through it:

microwaves do NOT cook from the inside out

The Volt is not a unit of power, the Voltage is defined as the energy (in joules) per charge (in coulombs).

3,000V is NOT deadly - I myself have had over 10,000V passed through my body with no ill effect (other than very static hair!).
  • Cae
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Post 3+ Months Ago

putting metal inside microwaves reflects the microwaves back at the microwave itself causeing havoc with the electical systems inside... the walls ar elined with metal so they reflect the microwaves back into the micro wave itslef to prevent your kitchen from becoming all microwavey (not a good thing)...

secondly there is a common misperception that the voltage is what is deadly, IT IS NOT, you could run 100,000 volts through your body with no ill affects as long as you do it carefully. it is the amperage (amps / how much voltage per second) which is deadly...

i still say its a conspiracy though... :P
  • icyroadz
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Found linked from howstuffworks.com, Answered March 17, 1997.
Quote:
Why can you put a can of frozen concentrate juice in the microwave? The metal doesn't spark or burn.

The microwaves in a microwave oven consist of electric and magnetic fields. Since electric fields push on electric charges, microwaves cause electric currents to flow through any metal objects they encounter. These movements of current don't necessarily cause any problems in a microwave oven. In fact, metal objects only cause trouble in the microwave oven when they are so thin or narrow that they can't tolerate the electric currents that flow through them or when they have such sharp ends that electric charges leap off them as sparks. A thin object like a twist-tie can't tolerate the currents and becomes very hot. Its sharp ends also allow charges to leap out into the air as sparks. But the thick, rounded end of a juice concentrate can easily tolerates the currents sent through it by the microwaves and doesn't have the sharp ends needed to send charges into the air as sparks. It doesn't present any problem for the microwave oven.


So the metal walls conduct electricity well enough and without points to cause arcing or causing it to heat up.

And calendae is right about the current being important. That's why a mere 120 V can be deadly in a wet environment. The water brings the resistance down and current = voltage/resistance so low resistance = high current = bad times.
:)

Now I have to go find my tin foil hat :P
  • Cae
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Post 3+ Months Ago

correction for my previous post...
aperage is *NOT* volts/second, rather aperage is the current, or (coulombs(charge)/second)...
just thought id get that straight before someone yelled at me about it... :P
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

So its to do with the thickness of the metal then... and the walls of the microwave have a large enough cross sectional area?

and Yep current is charge/second which is what gives you IV=P

charge/second x energy/charge = energy/second = watts
  • CazpianXI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Wow... we not only have a bunch of webmaster gurus here, but people here also double as scientists!

I'm impressed with ozzu.

~ Cazpian the 11th
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Post 3+ Months Ago

yeah.. i was tired... just got up... saw volts... bah... i should know this crap considering i was just tested on the bloody stuff...
  • natural_angel33
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I saw a show a long time ago about these guys who wanted to find out what would happen if they put different types of metal in the microwave, and nothing blew up, all they did was give off sparks. It was kinda neat actually. :D
  • icyroadz
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Post 3+ Months Ago

CazpianXI wrote:
Wow... we not only have a bunch of webmaster gurus here, but people here also double as scientists!


:) Well actually, yep, in my PhD right now, studying spinal cord injury though, not electricity.

I wouldn't call myself a web'master' by any stretch of the imagination, just sometimes I can be sorta helpful (I hope).
  • ccb056
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Post 3+ Months Ago

just a few notes on earlier posts:

a watt is a volt amp (watts=volts x amps)

water is not a conductor, it's the impurities in water than conduct electricity, pure water can be used as an insulator
  • b_heyer
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
The Volt is not a unit of power, the Voltage is defined as the energy (in joules) per charge (in coulombs).


That IS a valid statement. It is basically the ammount of work a bucket of charges (or a coulomb) does by lifting an apple (1 newton) 1 meter in the air. If you have more volts, more apples can be lifted. More current and hte apples get liffted faster.
  • IH8Purple
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I always thought that putting metal into a microwave activated the beacon for the aliens to come get you. But I don't have to worry, I live in an alluminum house.
(stops people from stealing my LAN to)

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