About RAM and overclocking

  • Yoda_Guru
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Is there a program where I can monitor my RAM temperature,and what is the optimum temp for it not to get burned?

I'm using corsair value select modules (2.5 8 3 3)@400Mhz and they worked fine @433 but I didn't want to go further with 1:1 FSB:RAM.

Thx.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • beings
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Post 3+ Months Ago

There is no program to view ram temperature. Ram temps are usualy quite high. Your corsair ram probably have heat spreaders on them so you should be ok. Get 2 case fans for the back so you can get rid of that excess heat. You should be fine because the computer will likely crash insted of burn out from heat. If your computer is crashing a lot during relaible games then you have a heat problem. For now just get some cheapo case fans.
  • Yoda_Guru
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Post 3+ Months Ago

OK so I'll install 1-2 more fans .
Thx :)
  • MOC
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Post 3+ Months Ago

http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php
http://mbm.livewiredev.com/download.html
Hot Cpu :
http://www.opusware.net/hotcpu.exe
Wcpuid 3:
http://www.bootdisk.com/mindyll/wcpuid3.exe
http://www.cpuid.com/pcw.php
http://www.lavalys.com/products.php?lang=en
CPU-Z 1.24
http://www.majorgeeks.com/download425.html

this is a list of Processor and MOBO utility's:
http://www.majorgeeks.com/download.php?id=14

These are just utility's that you might want to look at that :
as been said ,nothing to show real time ram temps.
monitor all of the systems
  • Johan007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

What kind of performance gains would one expect from memory overclocking. Faster disk reading? faster FPS in games?
  • MOC
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Post 3+ Months Ago

both ,but you have to have the whole package .so lets look at the rams.
And what I mean is you have to have a solid base to work with ,,meaning ,Processor,MOBO...and Good ram .


DRAM

Synchronous DRAM (SDRAM)

Double Data Rate Synchronous DRAM (DDR SDRAM)

Rambus DRAM (RDRAM)

Second generation double date rate memory (DDR-2)

Quad Data Rate Memory (QDR DRAM)
QDR technology can leverage existing DDR-1 technology

XDR DRAM =eXtreme Data Rate DRAM
XDR is effectively a hybrid of DDR and Rambus DRAM, designed to combine the best elements of both. Rambus claims that their mid-range XDR memory module is 8x faster compared to today's DDR-400. By "faster", they are referring to the module clock speed.you won't see
it until 2006



The front side bus (FSB)

lower figures = better performance,and possibly diminished stability.
higher figures = lesser performance, but increased overclockability and more stability
tRCD & tRP are usually equal numbers between 2 and 4. In tweaking for more overclockability, lower tRP first between these two
CAS should be either 2.0 or 2.5. Many systems, most nforce2, fail to boot with a 3.0 setting or have stability problems. CAS is not most critical of the various timings, unlike what is taught by many. In general, the importance of CAS when placed against tRP and tRCD is nominal. Reducing CAS has a relatively minor effect on memory performance, while lower tRP & tRCD values result in a much more substantial gain. In other words if you had to choose, 3-3-2.5 would be better than 4-4-2.0 (tRCD-tRP-CAS)
tRAS should always be larger the before mentioned timings. – see below


tRAS is unique, in that lowering it can lead to problems and lesser performance. tRAS is the only timing that has no effect on real performance, if it is configured as it should. By definition, real-life performance is the same with different tRAS settings with a certain exception. This document from Mushkin outlines how tRAS should be a sum of tRCD, CAS, and 2. For example, if you are using a tRCD of 2 and a CAS of 2 on your RAM, then you should set tRAS to 6. At values lower than that theory would dictate lesser performance as well as catastrophic consequences for data integrity including hard drive addressing schemes --- truncation, data corruption, etc --- as a cycle or process would be ended before it's done. How is it possible for memory timings to affect my hard drive? When the system is shut down or a program is closed, physical ram data that becomes corrupted may be written back to the hard drive and that’s where the consequences for the hard drive come in. Also let’s not forget when physical ram data is translated by the operating system to virtual memory space located on the hard drive.








Dealing with Memory Speeds / Frequencies

When the memory frequency runs at the same speed as the FSB, it is said to be running in synchronous operation. When memory and FSB are clocked differently (lower or higher than), it is known to be in asynchronous mode. On both AMD and Intel platforms, the most performance benefits are seen when the FSB of the processor is run synchronously with the memory – Although Intel based systems have a slight exception, this is completely true of all AMD-supporting chipsets. When looking at the AMD-supporting chipsets async modes are to be avoided like a plague. AMD-supporting chipsets offer less flexibility in this regard due to poorly implemented async modes. Even if it means running our memory clock speed well below the maximum feasible for a given memory, an Athlon XP system will ALWAYS exhibit best performance running the memory in sync with the FSB. Therefore, a 166FSB Athlon XP would run synchronously with DDR333/PC2700 (2*166) and give better performance than running with DDR400/PC3200, despite its numbers being bigger.

Only Intel chipsets have implemented async modes that have any merit. If you are talking about the older i845 series of chipsets, running an async mode that runs the memory faster than the FSB is crucial to top system performance. And with the newer dual channel Intel chipset (i865/875 series) in an overclocked configuration, often you must run an async mode that runs the memory slower than the FSB for optimal results. The async modes in SiS P4 chipsets also work correctly.
To achieve synchronous operation, there is usually a Memory Frequency or DRAM ratio setting in the bios of your system that will allow you to manipulate the memory speed to a either a percentage of the FSB (i.e. 100%) or a fraction (or ratio) i.e. N/N where N is any integer available to you. If you want to run memory at non 1:1 ratio speeds, motherboards use dividers that create a ratio of CPU FSB: memory frequency. However, intrinsically, it is possible to see the problem with this and why synchronous operation is preferable on all PC platforms. If there is divider, then there is going to be a gap between the time that data is available for the memory, and when the memory is available to accept the data (or vica versa). There will also be a mismatch between the amount of data the CPU can send to the memory and how much the memory can accept from the CPU. This will cause slowdowns as you will be limited by the slowest component.
Here are three examples illustrating the three possible states of memory operation:

200MHz FSB speed with 100% or 1:1 (FSB:Memory ratio) results in 200MHz memory speed (DDR400)


Such a configuration is wholly acceptable for any AMD system, memory should be set this way at all times for best performance. Asynchronous FSB/Memory Speeds are horridly inefficient on AMD systems, but may well be the optimal configuration for P4 systems.

200MHz FSB speed with 120% or 5:6 (FSB:Memory ratio) results in 240MHz memory speed (DDR480)


Peak bandwidth is important for certain applications that employ mostly streaming memory transfers.
Other applications with more random accesses, like games, will get more mileage out of lower latency timings.

lower latency timings
or
higher memory clocks

memory overclocking is just a part of overclocking your processor. They are done simultaneously. Since FSB frequency and Memory frequency are most times made to be the same,you look for the highest possible FSB .

There really is no risk at all to your system by adjusting memory timings and frequencies . windows will either load or it won't ,then you just back it down..But physical risk ? no there is none .

just some stuff to look at .
http://www.ocprices.com/index.php?rev_i ... on=reviews

http://www.lostcircuits.com/memory/ddrii/

http://www.rambus.com/

http://www.anandtech.com/memory/showdoc ... =2145&p=19

http://www.sysopt.com/reviews/Crucial_B ... index.html

There's so much stuff about ram it can make ur head explode.lol
RAM quality is important .(who makes it ?)
  • Johan007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Good post I enjoyed reading that. My RAM is good (200Mhz ram running at 166Mhz) dual channel but I cant overclock my Barton due to having a quite fan solution. If anyone knows of a good quite fan that’s overclockable let me know - thanks!
  • MOC
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Post 3+ Months Ago

This makes a big difference in cooling ,I have been using it for a long time.
http://www.arcticsilver.com/

Whats your's ? Socket A
http://www.xoxide.com/amdsoc462coo.html


Check this out BadBoy(It's only for Sckt 478/754) It's fanless ,no noise.lol
http://www.xoxide.com/scythe-ncu-2000.html



http://www.newegg.com/app/listProduct.a ... =62&DEPA=1
  • Johan007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have gone off fanless solutions when I perchased a VGA silensor that just did not do the job. I have a Socket A and I dont think Scythe NCU-2000 will fit my case even though I have a Power Supply Unit with a large underside fan like the one pictured.
  • MOC
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Yea thats erue about the case,did you read the specs,it's 14 feet tall.lol

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