a benchmark question

  • hoangxom
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Post 3+ Months Ago

hello.

Recently, I have purchased a laptop which is: Toshiba Satellite A105-S4014 15.4" Notebook PC (Intel Core Duo Processor T2400, 1024 MB RAM, 120 GB Hard Drive, DVD SuperMulti Drive). I installed FreshDiagnose and did a Processor Benchmark. There are 3 comparisons: MDIPS, MWIPS, and Speed. Comparing to a Intel Pentium 4 3.0 GHz, in MDIPS and MWIPS, mine is better, but in Speed, my computer is far lower from the Pentium 4 3.0. My question is: What is the role that MDIPS and MWIPS play in a computer? And is a Core Duo computer's speed really bad comparing to a Pentium 4?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • grinch2171
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The T2400 is only 1.83 GHZ, although you can think of it as a dual 1.83 since it is dual core.

MDIPS and MWIPS are synthetic benchmarks from what I read and apparently the dual core performs better than the P4 3.0Ghz. But in raw speed the 3Ghz beats your 1.83ghz. Why you are surprised I am not sure.
  • hoangxom
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Thank you.
I know that my computer's speed is just 1.83, but what surprised me was the fact that, the speed is too low comparing to the Pentium 4 3.0. The Processor Benchmark shows that my speed is equivalent to a Pentium 4 1.8 GHZ, in other words, it does not even reach a Pentium 4 2.0.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The dual core will out perform a single core P4 when using multi-threaded applications because each core will handle threads. That is probably why it did better with the MDIPS and MWIPS.

But if you are just looking at speed then yes you would equate to a 1.8 P4.
  • hoangxom
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Thank you for your clear explanation. It was just because I thought a centrino 1.83 would be equivalent to a pentium 4 2.2 (or higher).
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Post 3+ Months Ago

grinch2171 wrote:
The dual core will out perform a single core P4 when using multi-threaded applications because each core will handle threads. That is probably why it did better with the MDIPS and MWIPS.

But if you are just looking at speed then yes you would equate to a 1.8 P4.


No this is wrong. If you look at the Windows Task Manager you will realise that only one core is working...
The speed is misleading. It is actually the clock speed of the processor not its processing capabilities.
The processing capabilities can be seen at MDIPS and MWIPS. For instance my Processor is an Intel Core Duo @ 2.66Ghz which clearly outperforms a Pentium 4 @ 3 Ghz (the readings are twice and more of the ones of a 3.0Ghz processor).
  • grinch2171
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Post 3+ Months Ago

So you are saying a dual core processor only has one core working at any given time? I beg to differ. I have several multi-core machines plugging away and if I look at Task Manager I see both cores working. Now I do have a multi-core processor server that handles an application which is not multi-threaded and of course only one core is working it's butt off while the other three are just chilling.

A multi-core processor should out-process a single core CPU depending on if the application is multi-threaded. In single-threaded apps you probably won't see much performance gain with a dual-core CPU.

I can see a dual core 2.66 out performing a 3GHz P4. That isn't much of a stretch considering the architecture of the two CPU's is very different.
  • gizm0
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Benchmarking is neat in a way when you're comparing like items. Granted we're still talking about processors, but one wouldn't compare apples to oranges just because they're both fruit. Just like eating an orange would be better for you in certain circumstances, so would going the multi-core route. If you're big on multi-tasking or, like grinch mentioned, have many multi-threaded applications then a dual core will perform a lot better than the single. On the other side, if you are big on gaming and don't have too many games that are multi-threaded then having that single core cranked up at 3.0 Ghz will perform better.

If you haven't heard of MaximumPC yet, I would recommend taking a look at their website (http://www.maximumpc.com) or even checking out the magazine. They often have many good articles about performance parts and if I remember correctly they even did compare dual core vs. single core back when the core 2 first came out.

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