LAN NIGHTMARE!!! PLEASE HELP!

  • johnny2005
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Post 3+ Months Ago

We have recently moved out entire home office set-up from our basement to an upstairs room. I decided that I would set-up my D-Link 604 Router downstairs in a central location so I could have mulitple connections running to other rooms, both upstairs and downstairs.

After making up and running two ethernet cables through the walls to connect the router to our ADSL modem, we do not have internet connectivity.

I bring the router upstairs and connect directly using other cables and internet works perfectly.

The assumption then is that there is a problem in the ethernet cables, so I test those using an electronic LAN tester that checks for continuity, shorts and opens and everything rings through fine.

We have tried repeatedly to get the internet working in this way, but have had no luck and after several days it is becoming very frustrating.

Does anyone out there have any idea what might be going wrong here? It is completely baffling that it would work one way but not the same way with different cables...

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated..
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • Uncle_Slappy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Are you making your own cables, or using pre-made?
  • 5k1LLz
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Post 3+ Months Ago

cat5?
  • johnny2005
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I made the cables up, as I have many times before without problems...and yes they are cat5. I rang them through with a multimeter for continuity and also used an electronic LAN testing device which checked for proper connections on all eight wires and all seem ok.
  • ATNO/TW
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The first question that crossed my mind. OK, so you apparently have your modem upstairs. Dlink is downstairs. You run two lines, I assume one is to connect to the downstairs D-link and the other from the D-link to another upstairs router of some sort? Wondering if your routers are fighting each other? Just guessing a bit.
  • bigcheeez
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The most logical explanation is that there is some sort of interference in the walls. Maybe one of these cables is too long?

When you run the cable through the walls make sure it doesn't get too close to flourescent lights or especially power wires.

Do some research on shielding your cat5 wires; I know off hand that you can use some sort of conduit or even buy cat5 cabling with extra shielding.
  • ATNO/TW
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Post 3+ Months Ago

All good thoughts bigcheeez, and they all crossed my mind and I thought about suggesting them as well, but I couldn't figure out why his LAN tester worked but the actual connection didn't. I'm right with you though.
  • johnny2005
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have one DSL modem upstairs and one D-Link router downstairs from where I plan to run my other ethernet cables to other computers in the house.

To test the system after numerous failed attempts to get the internet working, I disconnected the cables running through the wall and floor and ran a different set from the devices directly (ie: not through the walls but down the stairs) and everything worked.

Unfortunately, when I installed the ethernet cables through the floor and into the basement, I was lacking a drill bit large enough to create holes that would allow the connector ends to come through so I used the bit I had and created two small holes, one for each cable. Then I pulled the cat5 through and crimped the ends on afterwards.

Now, if I want to pull these cables out I have to cut the connector ends off first, so when I ran the cables down the stairs, I had to use different cables rather than test the same ones which would more conclusively tell me if it were the cables that were the problem.

At any rate, neither of the cables exceeds 50' but there is a good chance they are near power cables at some point in their path. I know they are close to, if not touching the main heating duct which I didn't particularly like when I installed them. Would this cause a problem possibly?

I have never looked into shielding but I will to see if maybe that is the issue.

Bigcheeez, I think interference may be a strong possiblity, but ATNO/TW
you have a good point too--why does it work through LAN tester but yet no internet?. Could it be the signal still gets through but it's just not strong enough to get the internet running because of the interference?

I did note that when I attempted to connect to the interent, an icon appears in the bottom right saying that I have limited or no internet connectivity but assumed that was typical.
  • ScienceOfSpock
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The max operating length for Cat5 is 100m. I wouldn't think you would need that much cable to simply go upstairs, but having to run it through walls, cielings etc, it's possible.
  • bigcheeez
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I think it depends on the type of tester. I am assuming that a fairly inexpensive tester is being used here. Most of those just verify if voltage can make it from one end of a cable to the other on each wire pair. Johnny2005's network connectivity hardware probably detects a solid link at both ends in a similar manner. Of course actual data traveling over the wires is much more sensitive.
  • Ishii
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
I think it depends on the type of tester. I am assuming that a fairly inexpensive tester is being used here. Most of those just verify if voltage can make it from one end of a cable to the other on each wire pair. Johnny2005's network connectivity hardware probably detects a solid link at both ends in a similar manner. Of course actual data traveling over the wires is much more sensitive.


My thoughts exactly. You have an interference issue that is disturbing the data signal, but not disrupting the continuity of the cable.
  • johnny2005
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I pulled the cat5 cables out of the wall and tested them directly from the router to the modem and PC and they work fine. A little detective work and I find that my home security system is wired right alongside where I pulled my cat5 cables through.

Thanks for the help everyone! I'm going to find a new path to run my cat5 and this time pay more attention to where other possible sources of interference are.

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