PSU fan is knocking

  • 74123
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Post 3+ Months Ago

so last night my psu fan starts knocking, if i hit the top of my case is stops for a few minutes. The PSU is some off brand that came with my case. I didnt expect long life out of it but is the fan the sign of its death or what? Would it be ok do take the psu out and open it and see if its a wire hitting the fan or what? I dont really care if i kill the warrenty. tips would be great.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • UPSGuy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If you don't care about the warranty, then you won't hurt anything popping the case and having a look. Just follow the simple rules you would follow any time you crack a computer...make sure you are working in a static-free environment, ground-wire yourself, & keep all liquids AWAY from the tower!
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I built the computer - I just have never gone inside a PSU before(thats the warrenty im not worried about).
  • lucassix
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The PSU has just a normal 12V case fan in it. You can take it out, open it up, and splice a new one into it. Be careful though. The PSU has some big filtering capacitors in it which may still have a charge after the system is off. Just don't touch the bottom of the circuit board and you will be fine.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Thanks for the tip. Is there a safe way to discharge the PSU, without my fingers of course =P
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Post 3+ Months Ago

My apologies for stepping the intelligence level down a notch. I was so tired when I read your post that the page said PSU, but I was reading CPU. Sorry. :oops:
  • GT500Shlby
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Post 3+ Months Ago

lucassix wrote:
The PSU has just a normal 12V case fan in it. You can take it out, open it up, and splice a new one into it. Be careful though. The PSU has some big filtering capacitors in it which may still have a charge after the system is off. Just don't touch the bottom of the circuit board and you will be fine.


When I was in HS I was working at this hometown computer/electronics shop. Had to fix some TV's and such, and the first time I was working on a TV, I forgot to let it sit for a while before I went to work, and touched someplace I wasn't. And I was like <100lbs back then. Knocked my silly butt across the room! :shock:

Let's just say it was a hair raising experience... of sorts.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

So i should take the PSU out and let it sit for awhile before opening it?
  • ScienceOfSpock
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Post 3+ Months Ago

All of the PSU's I have worked on allow you to remove the top cover and access the fan without having to get anywhere near the bottom of the circuit board. Many even use standard connectors for the fans, allowing you to swap them out without cutting and soldering.
  • GT500Shlby
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Depending on the PSU and any future plans of upgrading, maybe your best option is just to go searching for a new PSU. If the PSU IS still under warrenty, maybe even RMA'ing it.

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