to be wired or wireless? thats the question

  • Shadow Knight
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Post 3+ Months Ago

which in your opinion think is faster, and more secure when it comes to wireless networks or wire networks?
  • Bgnn32
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Wired is faster and more secure, personally I don't believe that wireless should be used unless your are using a truely wireless computer (i.e. Laptop or PDA), but that is just me. Wireless is slower and less secure, but also you don't have to deal with the wires when seting up the box.
  • TomK
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Post 3+ Months Ago

As of now, wired is faster and more secure. Wireless may eventually become the only option though. That seems to be the direction we are heading in.
  • deirdre
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Def wired. But, wireless ....

... is great when cabling is not a convenient option
... can easily be made more secure
... and unless you need to transfer huge files or work heavily with database apps and graphic image servers across the LAN, doesn't feel any slower to the typical user who really just surfs the web and does email.
  • The_torst
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Wireless might look faster because of the speeds mentioned on the boxes; but keep in mind that it takes a lot longer to avoid collisions et.c., so the overall performance is weakened a lot.
Yeah, and then there's the security issue - it'll be very hard to make it as secure as wire.

I'd definetely go with the wire.
  • roarmeow
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Post 3+ Months Ago

another thought, though, is if you are living in an area with mad wireless going on, you can get your high speed internet for free...
heck... i pay for mine and, when i first moved here, there were no signals in the area... now, several months later, i'm still paying, but i can detect about 2-3 other wireless users in the area who are getting free internet from me...
just a thought about the bonuses of wireless (thought, i guess for me, it ain't so great right now - but when i move to manhattan, you know i'm not goin'a pay for my connection)...
  • grimshit
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Wired every time, except for convenience and in true portable things like PDA's and Laptops. For normal desktop PC's it is totally surpassed by good old wired networks. Fast Eternet provides speed security and easy setups unlike some wired networks, Nothing beats Gigabit Ethernet though for lan parties and fast file sharing. :P

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  • Razor Back
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Also Wireless also can suffer from interference. From Phones, and other cordless devices.
  • deirdre
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Twisted pair can suffer cross-talk/interference, too, of course, from other cables and lines nearby.
  • grimshit
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Post 3+ Months Ago

when it rains i dont recive a wireless signal with my card, :p
  • deirdre
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Image Does your bad knee ache, too?
  • Truce
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I can't believe the people in here sometimes.

WEP (wired equivalance protection) is how wireless networks stay secure. There are newer methods out, but WEP still holds strong. It encrypts your data with a 128-bit key that is then decrypted by the recipient. With 802.11G networks you should have no problem with speed either.

Wires get in the way and restrict how far you can move your computer. They also get damaged and need replacement quite often if they are not built into walls and such. Wiring can be expensive and the longer the wires the more money you can be out when you need to replace. Wires are faster than wireless, but not to an amount that it should be a key factor for home networks. They are only more secure in that if someone can't get to the wire they can't connect. The second someone gets a hold of a wire they have some control.

My conclusion, if wires aren't going to be long or a hassle to install then they work. If you don't want to bother with wires all over the place just get some wireless NICs and your good to go! Just remember to encrypt/secure your network!
  • grimshit
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Well in my opinon if you are sharing files over a network 802.11g is still allot worse than standard Fast Eternet, also for prices (in most places) wired networks are allot cheaper to setup.

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Post 3+ Months Ago

Humm.... Wireless G 54 mbps, Gigabit wired 1000 mbps, yep no speed difference there.

Also in terms of security, physical access is the first step someone needs to destory a computer, sure there are encryption methods and other security procedures with wireless, but you still are giving physical access to your network to anyone in range, and from there someone with the right knowledge and software can and will break in.
  • UNFLUX
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I'm with Truce 100% here. There's no contest if you can afford the smaller costs to going wireless, with a desktop or laptop. I'm slowly changing everything over to 100% wireless because there are far more advantages for using it vs. not using it.

roarmeow - why don't you secure your network so they can't use it? that makes no sense to me, that's why they make WEP.
  • grimshit
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Post 3+ Months Ago

it all depends what you want to do, wireless is good for portability, and appearance (no wires). If you are a normal user then wireless will do fine to transfer small pictures accross a network and using it for internet access. Wired on the hand is good for handling large quantities of data that need to be transfered quickly eg in games and rendering. This is just my opinoin but you cannot say that one of the two is better than the other, in its current state i say go with wired, but with new "Super G" coming in the speed of wireless has greatly increased. At the rate that technology is developing in this area wireless should overtake wired in a few years.

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  • wortho8
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Post 3+ Months Ago

if you ask me m8 got for the wired option i bought a wireless n i couldnt get it workin 2 save my life, so now im with wired always rhe best option if you ask me :iconthumbleft:
  • Truce
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Bgnn32, I am not sure how familiar you are with encryption, but let me give you a little heads up.

Ever go to a website that has an SSL connection? Ever buy something online? Well guess what.....you put your information in the hands of 128-bit encryption. Using this method of encryption, you can be rather confident that your information is safe because according to a report I read about 2 months ago, it would take the home computing power of the world about 56 years to crack a 128-bit encrypted piece of data. It would take a $25,000,000 computer about 8 years. (Theoretical statistic based upon the cost per unit of computing power today. Meaning such a computer doesn't currently exist....but with the new latch-switch from hp we might see one someday soon).

Bottom line, unless someone knows something they shouldn't your network is secure with a good 128-bit key. However, if you are lazy and use a 64-bit key, expect a decent hacker to gain access within a week.
  • ShEDeViL
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned that when you use 128-bit encryption that it slows down your connection because you have to encrypt everything that you send. I'm also surprised that people think that having a 128-bit encryption is the answer to all of their problems. Just because someone might not be able to see what your exact data is that your sending, it does not mean that they can't hijack your connection. If you really want to secure your wireless network you also need to change your SSID, diable the broadcast of your SSID, change your SSID periodically, change the default password for the administrator account, change your WEP key periodically, and use MAC filtering. Getting into your network will still be an arbitrary task for someone who knows what they're doing, but now your forcing them to put more effort into it.

I am also surprised that no one has mentioned how insecure most transfers over wired connections actually are. The truth is people have a false sense of security when it comes to the internet. You run a firewall? Great! You don't open email messages from people you don't know? Great! You run virus scan on your computer? Great! But do you have a bunch of services running on your computer that you shouldn't be/don't need? Do you ever use telnet? Do you still check your email via a POP mail server? Do you ever check your system logs? Are you actively running and maintaining some sort of IDS? People don't realize how much information they actually send over the internet in clear text.

The truth is most people don't know how to properly protect their computers on a wired connection, let alone a wireless one. I personally wouldn't reccommend a wireless connection for these people for anything more than surfing the web. Anything that requires a password/credit card number/etc is a no-no for people who don't know how to actively protect their computers in my opinion.

Another thing that I think is great for all of you people stealing wireless out there... Do you realize that if you are stealing someone's wireless that they could possibly be running it through their own computer before ever sending it off to the desired destination and could be looking at all of your packets? Don't get me wrong, I use other people's wireless when I'm hanging out in my living room with my laptop, but there is no way that I will do anything more than surf the web.
  • Truce
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Shedevil, encryption doesn't really slow down the network any considerable amount for a home network. Everyone is losing focus here....we are not talking about small business, an office, but rather a simple home network. I play CS:S daily over an encrypted network and I have 0 problems with speed, connectivity, or anything else for that matter.

I understand where you are coming from about MAC filtering and SSID broadcasting, but someone who is using a home network need not worry about those things. They still need to figure out the key in order to communicate with the router properly, and if someone is that tempted to get in.....well there is no stopping them security wise. Anytime I have ever seen someone get into a secured network it was due to "people hacking" skills and not computers. Perfect example of this was whatshisname that was hacking phones in the 90's--it was all a matter of getting ppl to give you info. If someone wants to get in that badly and they know how to do it then they can bypass more than they need to.

PS: Unless you set up a network to make all traffic go through a single computer, those packets aren't on anyone else's computer. The router handles that....hence the name.
  • ShEDeViL
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Truce wrote:
Shedevil, encryption doesn't really slow down the network any considerable amount for a home network. Everyone is losing focus here....we are not talking about small business, an office, but rather a simple home network. I play CS:S daily over an encrypted network and I have 0 problems with speed, connectivity, or anything else for that matter.
The fact is that it still slows down your traffic, I did not say that it was a drastic decrease.

Truce wrote:
I understand where you are coming from about MAC filtering and SSID broadcasting, but someone who is using a home network need not worry about those things. They still need to figure out the key in order to communicate with the router properly, and if someone is that tempted to get in.....well there is no stopping them security wise.
So you're saying that people shouldn't spend the extra 5 minutes to set up their networks properly? Why do you want to make it easier for people to break into your network? All it takes to get a 128-bit key is to sniff 2^128 packets of your traffic in a row. Depending on how much traffic you send through your wireless, this can be accomplished in a few days. Why would anyone ever broadcast their SSID? There is no reason to, you know your SSID and by disabling the broadcast of it you just have to type it in during the initial setup instead of your wireless card automatically finding it, its not difficult. I just don't understand why you would want to help people use your wireless? Besides the fact that the more traffic that is on your wireless, the slower it is, what happens if say someone gets on your wireless and does something illegal, whatever it may be. Say that it gets tracked back to you, you have no way of proving that it wasn't you and you're stuck with the consequences.

Truce wrote:
Anytime I have ever seen someone get into a secured network it was due to "people hacking" skills and not computers. Perfect example of this was whatshisname that was hacking phones in the 90's--it was all a matter of getting ppl to give you info. If someone wants to get in that badly and they know how to do it then they can bypass more than they need to.
Are you talking about Kevin Mitnick?

Truce wrote:
PS: Unless you set up a network to make all traffic go through a single computer, those packets aren't on anyone else's computer. The router handles that....hence the name.
Lets look at what I said...
ShEDeViL wrote:
Another thing that I think is great for all of you people stealing wireless out there... Do you realize that if you are stealing someone's wireless that they could possibly be running it through their own computer before ever sending it off to the desired destination and could be looking at all of your packets? Don't get me wrong, I use other people's wireless when I'm hanging out in my living room with my laptop, but there is no way that I will do anything more than surf the web.
I never said that they were. Besides if you are using some else's wireless you have NO way of knowing if they are using their computer for a router or if they have a separate router, so you have NO way of knowing if they are filtering your packets or not.

I still stand by my original statement that:
ShEDeViL wrote:
If you really want to secure your wireless network you also need to change your SSID, diable the broadcast of your SSID, change your SSID periodically, change the default password for the administrator account, change your WEP key periodically, and use MAC filtering. Getting into your network will still be an arbitrary task for someone who knows what they're doing, but now your forcing them to put more effort into it.


I just don't understand why anyone would want to only partially secure themselves when it would only take 5 minutes more effort. Why are people so accepting of a false sense of security?
  • Truce
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Post 3+ Months Ago

How would you determine a key through 2 packets of information in a decent amount of time? I understand the concept behind needing 2, but it is still a 128-bit encryption which takes some time to find.

Yes I was talking about Kevin Mitnick.

I do agree that disabling SSID broadcast and using MAC filtering is worth it, I do it myself, but the way you stated it made it seem as though encryption is too weak to make wireless networks secure and that nobody should ever consider not using the other means of securing the network. Many routers (most dlink and belkin) don't even support disabling SSID broadcast, and few support MAC address filtering. If you can do it....do it....if not....don't kill yourself.
  • ShEDeViL
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I said 2^128 packets, not 2 packets.
  • Truce
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Meaning 2 to the 128th power? That is 34,028,236,690,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 packets!

If you wanna sniff that many packets then go for it!
  • Bgnn32
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Truce wrote:
Bgnn32, I am not sure how familiar you are with encryption, but let me give you a little heads up.



Yea I understand how encryption works, but that still dosen't change the fact that with physical access a hacker can break in, you can make it harder to break in, but it is still possible
  • rjstephens
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Quote:
Ever go to a website that has an SSL connection? Ever buy something online? Well guess what.....you put your information in the hands of 128-bit encryption. Using this method of encryption, you can be rather confident that your information is safe because according to a report I read about 2 months ago, it would take the home computing power of the world about 56 years to crack a 128-bit encrypted piece of data. It would take a $25,000,000 computer about 8 years. (Theoretical statistic based upon the cost per unit of computing power today. Meaning such a computer doesn't currently exist....but with the new latch-switch from hp we might see one someday soon).


Ya know what? SSL is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from the encryption used with WEP. Because of the way WEP works, it is very easy to crack.

If you have 10KB/s transmitted constantly, for example, and someone was sniffing your packets, it would take less than a week before they had your key.

The only secure wireless encryption is WPA-PSK. WPA-PSK uses AES encryption, and, as such, is the most secure wireless encryption standard that is implemented in most devices. Even so, your key should be AT LEAST 20 characters long, because WPA is still vulnerable to the same type of attack as WEP.




HOWEVER, ASSUMING YOU DON'T CARE ABOUT SECURITY, there are still problems with wireless networks. I have a wireless network here for the benefit of the four wireless laptops that are used here (my dad has 2, my sister has one, and one of them is mine).

This is the story of the neverending supply of problems that this network has caused me.

The router is a netgear WGR614 (v4) that was bought in November last year. At the time, we didn't have any wireless-enabled computers but thought that we might add some in the near future. I downloaded an older version of the router firmware off the net (v4.04 - the router came preinstalled with v5.02) and installed that, because as far as i could tell, the only difference was that v4.04 didn't hijack the http://www.routerlogin.com domain and use it for the admin page.

Two weeks later, I bought and set up the wireless card in my laptop. It is a D-Link DWL-G650+. The laptop was running Win98 at the time, and after I had figured out how to use the D-Link configuration tool that came with the card, everything worked. The only problem at that point was that it would take about half a minute after the laptop had otherwised finished booting before I was connected to the WLAN.

Another two weeks passed, and my dad bought a wireless card for his laptop. This one was a netgear WG511. He also bought another WGR614 router for his office that I set up for him. He was running XP SP 2. I configured this, and it appeared to work fine. Another two weeks passed, and my dad bought a second laptop for one of his work-experience students to work on. He bought a WG511 wireless card for that, and I configured that to work at home and at his office too.

But this was not a straightforward process. For some reason, this card came with a very old version of the driver CD. Aside from not supporting WPA, this version had several bugs and was incompatible with XP SP2 (remember, this is dad laptop 2, which doesn't have SP2 on it yet). After trying for ages to get the thing to connect (and noting that it worked fine with WEP or no encyrption) I assumed that it wasn't working because it didn't have SP2 on it. So I installed that.. Once it was installed, the wireless card didn't work at all. It was only by pure chance that I noticed that the version numbers on the two CDs were different. So I grabbed the latest drivers off the net and installed them. This was v2.7, and one the other laptop had was v2.1 . I didn't bother updating dad laptop 1 because it was working already.

Then, earlier this year my sister's school started to issue laptops to the students. I configured the internal wireless card to work with the LAN at home. This worked for a while, then it stopped. I had upgraded my laptop to XP SP2, and couldn't connect it either. It just sat on "Acquiring Network Address", and didn't do anything, sometimes. Other times it worked flawlessly.

On wendsday last week, I needed to play a DVD. I had lost the DVD player software that came with the machine when I installed XP, so I downloaded a trial of nvidia DVD decoder extension for WMP and used that. It didn't work perfectly (half the image was invisible when running in window mode and nothing was visible at first unless you put it into full screen then back to window mode) but it did the job. Except that the wireless card stopped working altogether (as in, you click the "Refrish Network List" button and NOTHING happens. It doesn't change the text in the center of the network list, and it doesn't detect anything even when I put it right next to the router). I had no real need to use this at the time, so I didn't worry about it.

At home, there was always at least one person on a laptop on the net. For all of December, it worked perfectly. Then in january it started intermittently (sp?) going down. Usually some of us would be able to use the wireless but some of us couldn't connect. Sometimes noone could use it.

Last night, my sister HAD TO get on the net urgently to do some homework, and hers wasn't working. so I configured it. I had to change the wireless channel 3 times and set the router to "802.11g only" before I could get it to do anything other than sit there "Acquiring network address". Eventually that worked.

Later that night, dad came home with his old laptop (the one with the old driver on it, rememver?) and tried to connect. It worked first time.

But this morning he tried again. No luck. I was sick of screwing around with this stuff, so I grabbed the latest router firmware off the netgear site. this was listed as v5.04 in some places and v5.07 in others, but I downloaded and installed it anyway.

No dice.

Going out on a wymn (sp?) I fetched the v2.7 drivers for his wireless card off the net and put them on my flash key, and installed them on his computer. Finally, it worked.

My laptop still has no wireless networking because of the nvidia dvd player trial software. I still need this atm, but will uninstall it soon and see if that helps. If not, I will have to reinstall windows, which will be a huge chunk of wasted time.

SO the moral of all that is, don't use a wireless network unless you have to. I have wasted several hours configuring people's wireless cards, and don't ever want to configure one again. But I still need to make the wireless on my laptop work.

Wired networking is just so much easier. Wireless networks cause no end of problems. If it was up to me, we would have taped some wires to the ceiling and dangled them wherever people wanted to use laptops.

Wireless networks will cause you no end of problems. In the future, I will only use them when I absolutely cannot run cables.
  • rjstephens
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Wow, that was a post and a half. What's that? Three pages?

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