IP Address

  • ImmortalDuck
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Two questions, both about changing my IP address.

1) Most of the guides I found online for changing your IP address require you to edit your LAN Connection properties, but when I go into network connections, I don't have a LAN Connection. How can I create one? (Assuming it isn't too hard, but my other computer just had the connection made by default.)

2) If that doesn't work, how can I change my IP Address? Would calling SBC for my DSL modem do it if I just requested?

Thanks.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

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Post 3+ Months Ago

ImmortalDuck, I dont think Lan Connections is located at the network connections.
Open internet Explorer--> Tools ---> Internet Options---> Connections---> Lan Settings.
I believe that is where it should be.

As for changing the IP, if you buy a router, this pretty much takes care of it...(its way much easier)

hope it helps
  • pramitroy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Here is given a good instruction to change your IP.
http://info.bannersalesforce.com/xpedio ... _e.pdf.pdf
Are you under a domain? If so you may not be given the privilage to change your IP.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The LAN Connection Icon should be there, are you sure your network card is working correctly?

Also even if you got a router like SK suggested you would still need to change your IP to DHCP, so without that icon I would guess that your NIC is not installed properly, check the device manager for any yellow ! or red X.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ImmortalDuck wrote:
Two questions, both about changing my IP address.

1) Most of the guides I found online for changing your IP address require you to edit your LAN Connection properties, but when I go into network connections, I don't have a LAN Connection. How can I create one? (Assuming it isn't too hard, but my other computer just had the connection made by default.)

2) If that doesn't work, how can I change my IP Address? Would calling SBC for my DSL modem do it if I just requested?

Thanks.


ImmortalDuck, you are lacking some details that will deter an appropriate answer, but in spite of that here is an attempt.

Point 1 - You are unclear on exactly how your home system is networked. It appears you have two computers, at least, connected to a DSL modem. How are you doing this, via router/switch?
Point 2 - pramitroy's link explains how to change the IP of the computer itself, but will only work if you are on an internal LAN and have a means of obtaining an IP address internally via a router/switch.

Here's a typical home networking scenario.
Your DSL modem obtains an IP address automatically from the ISP provider's DHCP servers when it is powered on. This assigned IP address is then transfered to a router/switch which in turn has it's own IP range. Most contemporary routers have a built in DHCP server which will in turn assign an "internal" IP address to any computers connected to it, based on a "built in" range of IP addresses that it has available.

Router IPs typically end in .1 or .254. The most common home router IP is 192.168.2.1, and the router's IP range capabilities would extend between 192.168.2.2-192.168.2.254. Using pramitroy's instructional link, you could "manually" assign your computer an IP address to any IP address within the router's range, however this will not change the IP address assigned to the router itself by your DSL provider.

Calling your ISP provider and asking them to change your IP address, will be inaffective at best, and most likely won't happen. IP address (often refered to as "leases") will expire and be renewed automatically by the ISP's DHCP server on a preset time schedule configured in the DHCP server. This is typically around a 7 day time period, but may vary depending on how your provider configured their server. In the old days, and in particular with Dial-up providers, Lease renews typically would assign you a different IP address every time you connected to the internet. These are refered to as Dynamic IP address - dynamic because they change frequently. However, with today's broadband systems, although your IP lease will expire on a somewhat less frequent basis, your IP address is still "dynamic" and will change periodically. It is important to note that even when your IP lease expires and it is reassigned a new lease, the DHCP server will often times simply renew the lease on the same IP address you previously had if it is not already taken. It is not uncommon to retain the same IP address from your ISP for several weeks or even months.

One potential workaround to obtaining a different IP address from your ISP is to turn off power to your DSL modem for a 24 hour time period. When you repower the modem, it will request an IP address from your ISP. Chances are that your old IP address will have been assigned to another customer, and you may get a new IP address from your ISP, however that is not 100% assured.

If you have a need to have a single IP address that never changes from your ISP (referred to as a static IP), then you can contact your ISP's sales department and request one. You will typically be charged business rates for a static IP address, because the assumption is you will most likely be operating a web server or mail server (which are two typical reasons for needing a static IP).

Hopefully you will find that helpful. If that does not answer your questions, then try to be more specific about:
1. What you wish to accomplish
2. Exactly how your home network is hooked up.
  • ImmortalDuck
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ATNO/TW wrote:

ImmortalDuck, you are lacking some details that will deter an appropriate answer, but in spite of that here is an attempt.

Point 1 - You are unclear on exactly how your home system is networked. It appears you have two computers, at least, connected to a DSL modem. How are you doing this, via router/switch?
Point 2 - pramitroy's link explains how to change the IP of the computer itself, but will only work if you are on an internal LAN and have a means of obtaining an IP address internally via a router/switch.

Here's a typical home networking scenario.
Your DSL modem obtains an IP address automatically from the ISP provider's DHCP servers when it is powered on. This assigned IP address is then transfered to a router/switch which in turn has it's own IP range. Most contemporary routers have a built in DHCP server which will in turn assign an "internal" IP address to any computers connected to it, based on a "built in" range of IP addresses that it has available.

Router IPs typically end in .1 or .254. The most common home router IP is 192.168.2.1, and the router's IP range capabilities would extend between 192.168.2.2-192.168.2.254. Using pramitroy's instructional link, you could "manually" assign your computer an IP address to any IP address within the router's range, however this will not change the IP address assigned to the router itself by your DSL provider.

Calling your ISP provider and asking them to change your IP address, will be inaffective at best, and most likely won't happen. IP address (often refered to as "leases") will expire and be renewed automatically by the ISP's DHCP server on a preset time schedule configured in the DHCP server. This is typically around a 7 day time period, but may vary depending on how your provider configured their server. In the old days, and in particular with Dial-up providers, Lease renews typically would assign you a different IP address every time you connected to the internet. These are refered to as Dynamic IP address - dynamic because they change frequently. However, with today's broadband systems, although your IP lease will expire on a somewhat less frequent basis, your IP address is still "dynamic" and will change periodically. It is important to note that even when your IP lease expires and it is reassigned a new lease, the DHCP server will often times simply renew the lease on the same IP address you previously had if it is not already taken. It is not uncommon to retain the same IP address from your ISP for several weeks or even months.

One potential workaround to obtaining a different IP address from your ISP is to turn off power to your DSL modem for a 24 hour time period. When you repower the modem, it will request an IP address from your ISP. Chances are that your old IP address will have been assigned to another customer, and you may get a new IP address from your ISP, however that is not 100% assured.

If you have a need to have a single IP address that never changes from your ISP (referred to as a static IP), then you can contact your ISP's sales department and request one. You will typically be charged business rates for a static IP address, because the assumption is you will most likely be operating a web server or mail server (which are two typical reasons for needing a static IP).

Hopefully you will find that helpful. If that does not answer your questions, then try to be more specific about:
1. What you wish to accomplish
2. Exactly how your home network is hooked up.


I understand I was unclear, and sorry, it was early in the morning.

1) I wish to just change my IP address from my previous one.
2) I was being unclear here mostly.. I meant on my old computer, using the same connection. Right now I just have this computer hooked up to a DSL Speedstream modem.


And I check my IP every month or so, and I don't really notice any change. What part of it changes? Of course, I don't memorize the IP Address at the time so it could have just slightly changed.

I'll probably just leave my DSL Speedstream off/disconnected for 24 hours, like you said, and hopefully it'll change when I connect again. This seems like the easiest solution.

Thanks so far, everyone.

Edit: Oh, and I don't really understand what NICs and DHCPs are. Can anyone explain?
  • grinch2171
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Post 3+ Months Ago

NIC = Network Interface Card
DHCP = Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, they are servers that assign IP addresses.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
And I check my IP every month or so, and I don't really notice any change. What part of it changes? Of course, I don't memorize the IP Address at the time so it could have just slightly changed.


Your host has a preassigned range of IP addresses that are unique to them, and that is the "pool" of addresses they hand out to their customers. You may or may not notice any change in an IP address on DSL for an extended time. As I noted earlier, when your IP lease expires, your ISP will renew the lease. Frequently you are reassigned the exact same IP address. If for some reason it does happen to change, it will most likely be the last three numbers of the IP address (designated by x's in the example below)
123.123.123.xxx
  • ImmortalDuck
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Gotcha, thanks so far. Will leaving my modem off for 24 hours/not connecting to the internet still change it?

I figured it was the last three that changed.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Can't promise you it will change it. It may not even take that long. Depends on how they are configured at their end. What happens is, after a period of time, unused IP addresses will fall back into the useable address pool. This time period will vary depending on how they configure their server. 24 hours may or may not be long enough for this to happen.

But I get the feeling after rereading your post a couple times you may not even need that.

On the machine in question, with it connected to the cable modem go to start |run and type cmd (if windows XP or Win2K) or type command (if 98 or me). then:

If XP or Win2K type:
ipconfig /release
Then type:
ipconfig /renew

If 98 or me type:
ipconfig /release_all
then type:
ipconfig /renew_all

This should release your network card's IP address and obtain a new one.
  • ImmortalDuck
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I tried to release/renew, but it didn't change anything. Now if I do it, no text will even come up on the command prompt.
  • ImmortalDuck
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Oh, and can I somehow make a new LAN connection, since mine's not here for some reason? I found tons of guides to changing my IP, but I need to edit my LAN settings.
  • grinch2171
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Down at the bottom right you should have a little icon of two computers that blink occassionally.
Right click that icon and select Open Network Connections.
In that window you should see your connection.
Right click that and select properties
Double click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
There is where you can change you LAN IP address. This does not affect the IP your ISP gives you.
  • ImmortalDuck
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Post 3+ Months Ago

grinch2171 wrote:
Down at the bottom right you should have a little icon of two computers that blink occassionally.
Right click that icon and select Open Network Connections.
In that window you should see your connection.
Right click that and select properties
Double click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
There is where you can change you LAN IP address. This does not affect the IP your ISP gives you.


I tried this earlier, but the IP I entered in didn't work, so I had to make it obtain the normal one.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

By the way, here is a little Microsoft KB on missing LAN connection icons. It should help you retrieve your missing LAN Connection.
http://support.microsoft.com/default.as ... duct=winxp
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Post 3+ Months Ago

What IP did you enter?

One other thing I should mention. When dealing with changing IP addresses you need to know more than just changing numbers. You must have some familiarity with Subnet Masks and Default Gateways. If you don't know what these are then you should not change your IP. Either, Windows will not accept your changes because they are wrong or you will not be able to communicate with your router or other PC's on the network.

Maybe a visual will help. CLICK HERE
  • ImmortalDuck
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Yeah, I don't know pretty much anything about Subnet Masks or Default Gateways. However, my IP changed, I don't know if it was the release/renew I did last night or not, but I turned my modem off this morning for a second, started it back up, and now have a different IP.

Thanks everyone, :)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If you are using a cable/DSL modem and a router, you may wish to connect your computer directly to the cable/DSL modem. Please note that this could significantly impact your system security. This allows your ISP's DHCP to issue you a new (hopefully changed) IP address based of the (hardware) MAC address of your computer's ethernet card.

If all the above has not worked to change your IP address and you have a router, check and see if there is a "Clone MAC Address" option. Using it should change your IP address; however, you'll only be able to do it once (in most cases).

These will not work in all cases. If all else fails contact your internet service provider (ISP) and ask them if they are able to change your IP address or how long your connection needs to be off for your IP address to change.

If you trying to change your IP address because you are just trying to access web based forums you may wish to attempt to configure your internet browser to use a proxy server.
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