How to create a windows xp domain?

  • cargenius42
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[size=18]I was wondering HOW to create a domain to join together 4 computers running windows xp. :x
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cargenius42 wrote:
[size=18]I was wondering HOW to create a domain to join together 4 computers running windows xp. :x


lol this question is dumb on so many levels where do i start. Hummm. First of all use an os such as windows server 2003 windows nt server or windows 2000 server. i would say advanced server 200 but if your askin how to do this you should just stick with the non advanced version. Second you dont need a domain to link 4 computers running windows xp all you need is a simple hub,switch,or router(if your running some sort of broadband connection.) If your just tryin to join together 4 xp machines a hub or switch will do. Third read a book about this s*** cause this question was dumb your lucky im not a moderator or this topic would have been locked due to stupidity
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Asking a question that you don't know the answer to, is not dumb WoRd Of WiSdOm. Not everyone around here is an expert with computers. (And please watch your language). Your reply makes it apparent why you are not a moderator.

You pretty much answered the question , but to make it a little more clear, you can't create a domain with just a Windows operating system like XP. You need a server as noted. The hub / router /switch solution is probably the simplest solution that even inexperienced users could probably do with ease.
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My Sincerest apologies For The Outburst[/list]
  • ddddd
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Hi everyone, my problem is quite similar:

I have a small network, consist of 10 computers. 2 of them are servers:
SERVER 1 : web server(Xitami) & internet gateway(AnalogX Proxy)
SERVER 2 : local video server(VideoLAN)
the rest is client. All computers use windows XP PRO. They all connected to 16 port switch.

I have 1 public IP shared and a subdomain name (myweb.isp.com) from my local ISP.

I'm intented to add more services (and more computer if required):
1. local domain controller server
2. mail extension; and (if possible)
3. myweb.isp.com name domain server

What should I prepared?
Where should I deployed the services?
Assuming OS installation other than WinXP PRO is not an option, are there any 3rd party programs that could help me run those services?

Thank you for any response for this posting
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You can't have a "Windows domain" without running a Windows server (and XP Home clients can't be joined to a domain, so good thing you have XP Pro). The best you can do with XP (without a server) is establish a peer-to-peer network, and I think 5 computers is the max you can do. If you don't already have a server, then look into getting 2003 Server Small Business Suite. It allows up to 50 CAL's (computer access licenses). The licenses will cost you more than the server. Depending on what you want for a server and where you get it from you are possibly looking at 8-10 grand (maybe less depending on how many licenses you need). Exchange will handle your email. You kinda sorta need to know what you are doing on this. It's a fairly simple process if you know what you're doing, but it's overwhelming if you don't. You might want to consider some Windows networking classes if you haven't been there done that already.
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Good Question! I've also been trying to configure XP Pro as a domain server - simply because I want to do it because everybody else is saying you have to use XP 2000 or 2003 or NT.

Yes, I've seen in the help files where it says Active Directory is not available in XP Professional or XP Home. That doesn't mean it can't be added.

I've also read somewhere in another forum (just today) that the Windows 2003 Active Directory management tools WILL work in XP Pro (you just have to figure out how to get them there.)

I have ALSO seen that MS Help files for one of the msc panels tells me I can't use the Active Directory management console UNLESS I have "XP Professional configured as a server" - which I take as an implication that, somehow, there is a way to configure XP Pro as an Active Directory-capable server.

To the people who pooh-pooh the idea and say "Get Windows 2003 Server", I say, buy me the PC and CD and I'll be happy to. I already OWN this PC that already has XP Pro installed. Just because you can't figure out how to do something, doesn't mean it can't or shouldn't be done.

All I want to do is get XP Pro to do the minimum needed as a domain server, so I will have a domain name to use with SMTP, so I can do email directly to & from my PC without having to use someone else's email server to host my mail. ESPECIALLY now that the ISP's have all been given permission to legally snoop on all the emails. - but really, I just want to see if I can do it because so MANY people keep saying it can't be done. What better reason is there for a PC hobbyist to try to do something?

While I'm here, does anyone know how to make the stubborn IIS 5.1 in XP Pro reveal the default SMTP virtual folder which must be there, but which has apparently been hidden by MS Exchange? No doubt there's a simple registry entry that could be tweaked or added to reveal it, but that'll be the needle in the haystack. Or maybe it will be revealable once I get the Active Directory Administration tools (from 2003 Server) installed on this PC (since I read today that they would work under XP Pro.) So far, all the SMTP configuration docs start by saying "run the IIS admin tool and open the SMTP virtual folder" - but it doesn't show in mine. (Yes, SMTP is already running.)

********
Running XP Pro with SP2 & lots of other stuff
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Post 3+ Months Ago

John,

Hope you're having some success.
The AD tools that run on XP still need to access a 2000/3 server. XP simply doesn't have the functionality to create and maintain Active Directory and Domains.

I would suggest though that you get your hands on a copy of Server 2000/3 trial edition which MS Press have in there books related to it. Shouldn't be too hard to obtain/borrow/steal...

On a fresh box partition the HDD and install XP pro on one and 2000 Server on the other then do a file comparison and see what Server has got that XP doesn't.

Identify the files and copy them over to the XP partition. You'll also need to do a simliar (but far more difficult operation) on the registery... that'll be the killer.

Let us know how ya go. I've got just this setup and might do it myself but my XP system is fairly loaded and tweaked and the comparisons might not be as simple as on a clean system.

Regards
Ragman
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I've put that project on indefinite hold. I've been told it can be done when XP is first installed on the PC, but not afterward. And I'm not about to wipe my 7-year-old PC to try it out. Maybe someday if I buy a new C: drive, I'll see what happens.

I'm still wondering (if it can't be done) why Microsoft has in one of its help messages that such and so requires "bla bla bla or a Windows XP Professional PC configured as a domain server". You'd think they'd have known whether or not it could be done.

Regardless, I am not going to be getting either another PC, nor am I going to reconfigure this one to be running 2003, so neither of those are solution options.

I DID find a site somewhere that explained how to get some of the 2003 server tools installed on an XP machine to do what I am attempting, but now I'm fiddling around with other stuff and (being retired) have no great incentive to hurry back to focus on the project.

Thanks for replying, though.
  • Hesham
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Post 3+ Months Ago

hii guys , i just have a problem and cant figure out a soluation

i have a switch at home connecting my pc and my laptop and another switch with 12 users and i want to share files between my pc and laptop and in the other hand i dont want any other user to gain access to this files , i dont know how its done but in some how when u r trying to access shared files a username and password window appear asking u to gain acces but in my case either im granted or im denied without any username or password window im using xp pro on both computer , can anyone help howa can i get the username and password window to make sure im the only one who can acces this files , and by the way there is DHCP server so i cant share files for specefic ips my ip today is not my ip tomorrow
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Is this a home network or a work network?

The easiest simplest way for this to be done is to make sure all XP machines are part of the same workgroup. The same user accounts need to exist on all the machines with same passwords. Then share out a folder containing the files you want/need to access and grant permission to the user accounts you want to have access. Then to access the files you would click on Start then Run and type in \\computername\sharedfoldername and press enter. No need to know the IP address but you could do \\ipaddress\sharedfolder.
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thx grinch , but thats not my question , simply i just want to share files on my pc and to be asked for username ans password on my laptop so i can access this files , hope u can help
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You cannot run Active Directory or Domain Controller Services from an XP box, completely impossible, anyone who says they do is full of it.
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Actually if you want just the Primary Domain Controller running on Windows XP Pro (Or Any Windows Version though you need XP Pro for XP Clients to Login) this can be done, and fairly easy. It takes a little effort and the knowledge that Windows Server is not the only way to have a PDC for an NT Domain. You can use Samba which is what most Linux systems use to share files with Windows. This can also be compiled and run on a Windows system with the GNU Compiler Cygwin which is just a really stripped down version of Red Hat that can run on Windows, it works for many applications and is somewhat handy. http://smithii.com/node/36 is a quick link on a setup guide I found, it does not go over configuring Samba as a PDC. I do recommend a great book I used for learning Samba Server administration which when I remember the name (The book is at work) I’ll be glad to post it. I do know this works as I have it running at home as a NT Domain Server and at work as well rather than buying a server OS. The only bad thing is you can’t have a backup domain controller as far as I remember, my Samba installs are still 2.4.X or so fairly old and I know it was a planned update. Samba is now in the 3.X.X versions so it may be possible.
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:D can anyone help me i would like to do the following:

create a system where i can log on to any computer on a network, and build a media storage computer, i have five members of my family so i want to add a 160GB hdd partitioned into 5 giving each member of the family 32GB of personal space "will i need to put passwords onto each hard drve and how do i do this" i will also like to put a 250GB hard disk in here to as shared space

my hardware is as follows

BT home hub

computer: AMD 64 3800+ with a dvd-rw, 1gb ram running windows vista home premium connected to the home hub through an ethernet able

laptop: Intel PIII 700Mhz no rom drives
256mb RAM running XP PRO
connected through WI-FI

computer: intel Celeron 2.2GHz DVDROM/CD-RW 256mb RAM running XP Home SP2
not connected to HOME HUB

XBOX 360: PATCH cable
XBOX console: NOT connected

and will soon be adding:

Computer: Intel celeron 700MHz DVD-rom
256MB RAM running Windows XP PRO

Computer: Intel celeron 700MHz DVD-rom
256MB RAM running Windows XP PRO

and a laptop: Intel Celeron 550mhz cd-rom
32mb RAM running 98SE

and would like a printer networked to all computers could you tell me what printer would be best i have 2 teenagers on the go a 5 year old and me and my wife so it will have to bee cheap to run

could anybody tell me what specs i will need for the server, what i will need to connect all the computers to the network what hardware i will need and what software i will need also

THANK you very much KEITH


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i also have sky tv sattellite would it be possible to watch sky and record tv over the network thanx again keith
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Okay well I'll take a stab at this one.

For the server it very much depends on what O/s you are planning on running. Server 2003 or Linux?

Linux requirements if you run it in console mode are very low really. In fact Bigwebmaster has a great guide on his website regarding linux server requirements. Can't find it on his website but got another link to another copy of it here:
http://tldp.org/HOWTO/HP-HOWTO/sizing.html

I think its fairly old but the parts you need for linux are fairly low key really.

For Server 2003 I'd go for a dual core CPU mainly because of the media server stuff, especially if its going to be transcoding(which ideally in fact you'd get a dedicated card for, I saw a PCI video encoding card not long ago in a magazine. Fairly reasonably priced).

I'd say at least 2Gb of RAM, dependant in some ways on what people will be doing with the server etc.

Hard drives:
I would suggest using RAID to mirror the hard drives which means you will need 2 of each. You seem to know a bit about computers so I assume you are aware that if you divide a 160Gb drive into 5 parts they won't each get 32Gb, closer to 30Gb as a 160Gb drive is really only about 152Gb. You would probably be better off in some ways getting two 500Gb drives. The second mirrors the first, the first is separated into the partitions you want. Obviously SATA at least, preferably SATA2(and if you buy a new motherboard it most likely will be SATA2 anyway).

DVD-RW:
You might in many ways want to get a DVD-RW drive as well, primarily for the possibility of backing up video from the media segment or backup of the other files. Reason I suggest the media segment is that it can be a long process if you are backing up 40Gb of data to DVD discs. And a tape backup option is probably a bit more than you really need.

Printer:
3 words. Personal Laser Printers.
They are getting cheaper and cheaper and they are also the cheaper to run per page than Inkjet printers. The next question is whether you want colour or not. I'm figuring yes since you have two teenagers in the house who will no doubt use it for printing out assignments. For example looking at a review I read just before, AUS$1331 for the printer, mono cartridges are AUS$98 and last for 8000 pages, colour is AU$166 and lasts for 8000 pages as well and the "printer maintenance kit" is good for 200,000 pages but at a price of $1199, which lets face it by that point your more likely to buy a new one. Its networkable etc. If not a lot of printing will really go on then a Inkjet might be just as good a choice in the end. There are cheaper laser printers out there but it's important to read reviews to determine what the running costs are, the per cent cost and the quality as some sell for $400 but the per page costs are 5 times as high etc.


The server 2003 workings might not be totally correct and there are other people here better qualified to work out this, I'm working off what I plan myself for a Media Centre PC.

Oh SkyTV.
This I do know a bit about.
Unfortunately there isn't a lot of options in this area. The decoder box that they supplied will no doubt only have one output channel. You can try a third party decoder box, they are usually more full PVR hardware though, so hard drive to record TV shows on etc. If you could transfer the files from the PVR to your computer then it would fulfill your plans though.
  • islandinthesnow
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Keith,

I don't know if you'll be checking this, but chances are I'll assume you didn't pony up the $8,000 to create your own Windows 2003 domain or become a Linux expert in SAMBA in order to simply share some files and allocate disk space to your family.

What I would do:

Create an XP Pro-based system, and throw your hard drive(s) in there. For backups, yes a DVD-RW would be nice, but you would be better off with a removable disk, such as an external SATA Hard Drive. (Even a USB 2.0 external would get the job done. The point is you have the capability to have your backups off-site, in case - for instance - your house gets carried away by a tornado). Obviously your files won't be the greatest of your worries, but it is one less headache in the event of an unforeseeable catastrophe.

Now, it sounds like you're simply trying to allocate each member of your family a fixed amount of hard drive space on a Windows-only "Domain" using a flat network architecture. Considering they're your family, and that this is a home network, everyone will most likely be using windows platforms, thus everyone will probably be using the NTFS filesystem. This means separate partitions on your hard drives would be, in short, a waste of both time and resources. By doing that, you're losing valuable space between each partition, and it's completely unnecessary. Instead of partitioning your hard drives, we'll focus on simply manipulating the many available tools in Windows XP Pro that control the permissions and security levels involved in file sharing.

In your Windows XP Pro machine that is to eventually become your central fileserver, go to Control Panel - Administrative Tools - Computer Management and you'll see a few handy tools you have to work with, specifically "Local Users and Groups" and "Shared Folders". At this point, you'll want to turn off Simple File Sharing - that's going to give you plenty of control (almost like a domain, but not quite) over your shares.

After you've turned off SFS, you'll want to create an user account for each member of your family. Under "Local Users and Groups", click "Users", then click "Actions" and finally "New User". Type the credentials, and repeat using different credentials for each account.

Now you have the option to create groups. Groups help you manage high numbers of users more easily, because instead of adding each user to each folder, you can add any number of users to a group, and simply add the group to the folder. This, in some situations, saves time. However, in your situation, I wouldn't recommend it because it's an extra step that you won't need. I will, however, briefly cover it in case you're interested:

Under "Groups", you'll want to make at least one group for file shares, one group for administrative purposes (access to everything) and one group for printer access. This is assuming your network printer will be attached to this fileserver.

For instance, you may name the group that has access to files as "FileAccess", and the group that has access to your printer as "PrintAccess". Add the appropriate user accounts in each group, like your user account in "Administrators" and "FileAccess"

Long story short: You can create folders on the root of your fileserver hard drive, and name them anything from the user's name to 1, 2, 3...etc. By right-clicking the folder and choosing preferences, you can use the security/sharing tabs to control which users and/or groups you would like to have read/write/access permissions.

To be more specific, you'll want to add each user to their particular folder, and give them full control over it. You'll also want to remove "Users" from the access list, as well as anyone else that doesn't require access to the folder. You may also want to consider giving yourself administrative rights over each folder, but that's better left up to you. (You'll have access to the folders anyway by logging on to the server with an administrative account).

Now that you've set up your folders, users, and permissions, we're going to want to access all of it - that is the point, right?

From any machine, open "My Computer", click "Tools" and "Map Network Drive". In the field, type \\servername\sharedfolder where "servername" is the name you gave your fileserver (or the static IP address you assigned it) and "sharedfolder" is the shared name of the folder you want to access. You will be prompted to enter credentials (the username/password for the account that has permission to access the folder) and, provided everything went as planned, voila! - the user has access to a semi-private networked drive on a central server running XP in your home.

If you run into any speedbumps (or if I failed to address something - I did this from memory), feel free to hit me back with questions. Just let me know what area you got stuck on, and I'll do my best to help you out.


Good luck,
RILEY
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I think you've pretty much solved the issue to do a domain work around. Good stuff. However, the only thing I think you left out would be how to limit the allotted space for each user. Sure they will have their own directory, but kid A could use up the entire disk space, leaving nothing for anyone else. Really I guess it will be up to the administrator (dad) to monitor this anyway.

Good post. Thanks.

islandinthesnow wrote:
Keith,

I don't know if you'll be checking this, but chances are I'll assume you didn't pony up the $8,000 to create your own Windows 2003 domain or become a Linux expert in SAMBA in order to simply share some files and allocate disk space to your family.

What I would do:

Create an XP Pro-based system, and throw your hard drive(s) in there. For backups, yes a DVD-RW would be nice, but you would be better off with a removable disk, such as an external SATA Hard Drive. (Even a USB 2.0 external would get the job done. The point is you have the capability to have your backups off-site, in case - for instance - your house gets carried away by a tornado). Obviously your files won't be the greatest of your worries, but it is one less headache in the event of an unforeseeable catastrophe.

Now, it sounds like you're simply trying to allocate each member of your family a fixed amount of hard drive space on a Windows-only "Domain" using a flat network architecture. Considering they're your family, and that this is a home network, everyone will most likely be using windows platforms, thus everyone will probably be using the NTFS filesystem. This means separate partitions on your hard drives would be, in short, a waste of both time and resources. By doing that, you're losing valuable space between each partition, and it's completely unnecessary. Instead of partitioning your hard drives, we'll focus on simply manipulating the many available tools in Windows XP Pro that control the permissions and security levels involved in file sharing.

In your Windows XP Pro machine that is to eventually become your central fileserver, go to Control Panel - Administrative Tools - Computer Management and you'll see a few handy tools you have to work with, specifically "Local Users and Groups" and "Shared Folders". At this point, you'll want to turn off Simple File Sharing - that's going to give you plenty of control (almost like a domain, but not quite) over your shares.

After you've turned off SFS, you'll want to create an user account for each member of your family. Under "Local Users and Groups", click "Users", then click "Actions" and finally "New User". Type the credentials, and repeat using different credentials for each account.

Now you have the option to create groups. Groups help you manage high numbers of users more easily, because instead of adding each user to each folder, you can add any number of users to a group, and simply add the group to the folder. This, in some situations, saves time. However, in your situation, I wouldn't recommend it because it's an extra step that you won't need. I will, however, briefly cover it in case you're interested:

Under "Groups", you'll want to make at least one group for file shares, one group for administrative purposes (access to everything) and one group for printer access. This is assuming your network printer will be attached to this fileserver.

For instance, you may name the group that has access to files as "FileAccess", and the group that has access to your printer as "PrintAccess". Add the appropriate user accounts in each group, like your user account in "Administrators" and "FileAccess"

Long story short: You can create folders on the root of your fileserver hard drive, and name them anything from the user's name to 1, 2, 3...etc. By right-clicking the folder and choosing preferences, you can use the security/sharing tabs to control which users and/or groups you would like to have read/write/access permissions.

To be more specific, you'll want to add each user to their particular folder, and give them full control over it. You'll also want to remove "Users" from the access list, as well as anyone else that doesn't require access to the folder. You may also want to consider giving yourself administrative rights over each folder, but that's better left up to you. (You'll have access to the folders anyway by logging on to the server with an administrative account).

Now that you've set up your folders, users, and permissions, we're going to want to access all of it - that is the point, right?

From any machine, open "My Computer", click "Tools" and "Map Network Drive". In the field, type \\servername\sharedfolder where "servername" is the name you gave your fileserver (or the static IP address you assigned it) and "sharedfolder" is the shared name of the folder you want to access. You will be prompted to enter credentials (the username/password for the account that has permission to access the folder) and, provided everything went as planned, voila! - the user has access to a semi-private networked drive on a central server running XP in your home.

If you run into any speedbumps (or if I failed to address something - I did this from memory), feel free to hit me back with questions. Just let me know what area you got stuck on, and I'll do my best to help you out.


Good luck,
RILEY
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have a 3 (all xp pro) computer setup with 2 NAS devices. I moved one of the machines from wired to wireless. Now I cannot get that machine to reconnect to the domain ('WORKGROUP') using only a wireless connection.

Anybody know how to remove all references to the workgroup domain in XP so I can rebuild it? I have tried creating a non-existing domain and then recreating the workgroup, but that did not work.

I do NOT have a domain server.

Thanks in advance.

Bill.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Sounds like a wireless problem not a workgroup problem.
  • bjjohns
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I don't think it is. one other laptop can connect to the workghroup with no problem. I also have a bridge that connects to the workgroup. I have been looking in quite a few places for the answer - this group came the closest to discussing my problem.

I may have to just build a new workgroup and connecting everything to that network - starting with the recalcitrant computer.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If your workgroup worked fine in a fully wired scenario and now doesn't work because you switched to wireless would point to some sort of wireless issue. Wired or wireless it is basically all the same. I have an actual domain running at my house and I have three wireless laptops that can connect to the domain both wireless or wired without any change in configuration.

You also need to stop using the domain terminology. You are not running a domain. You are running a workgroup, huge difference.
  • lindsay
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Post 3+ Months Ago

you can not make the domain with the help of the windows xp. if you want to make the domain . installed the server 2003 or more than you can make the domain as the computer and make all the other computers as client.

windows xp does not provide the domain feature . this domain feature is only from the servers.

after installing the server 2003 . installed the active directory so that the you can make the computer as domain .

you need a switch and router to connect the rest computers with each other .
  • connorsixeight
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hesham wrote:
thx grinch , but thats not my question , simply i just want to share files on my pc and to be asked for username ans password on my laptop so i can access this files , hope u can help


you could make an ftp server with file zilla you can get it here: filezilla-project(dot)org

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