Transfer disk space

  • ACharles
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Post 3+ Months Ago

How do I transfer disk space form two drives that I don't use to my local drive C?

Kind regards
AC
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • twiztit_momma
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The free way is the better way, in my opinion. This method involves the use of the common copy and paste routine of Windows. First, you must install the new drive. Temporarily install it as a slave to the old drive.

Set up the new drive as drive D:, or whatever your slave drive should be. Partition and format the new drive just like normal. In order to use this method of file transfer, the partitions on the new target drive have to be the same sizr or larger than the source drive. More simply, there must be enough space on the target drive to hold the data you are trying to transfer to it. Also, the partitions must be mapped similarly to the old drive. This is because we will be transferring each partition's content to the target drive, into the drive partition that will have the same drive letter once the old drive is removed.
For example, let say the old drive has a C, D and E partition setup. The C drive contains the operating system. When you partition the new drive, create at least three partitions to correspond to the C, D, and E partitions on the old drive. The sizes of the partitions to not need to be equal, as long as each new partition is large enough to accomodate the data of the source partition. Once the new drive is installed as a slave, the three partitions we are concerned with will be mapped F, G and H. Once the old drive is removed, F will become C, G will become D, and so on. The layout of the files across the partitions must remain the same in order to maintain the integrity of your Windows registry and shortcuts.
In Windows Explorer, choose View/Options. Select Show All Files. Deselect "Hide MS-DOS file extensions for the file types that are registered". Click OK.
Go to the root directory of the C: drive and select all files and sub-directories. You can do this by doing Edit/Select All. On many systems, one will run into problems if the Windows swap file is selected. For this reason, you may want to deselect the Windows directory for now, copying everything to the F drive (using the above example) except for the WINDOWS directory. If you originally set up Windows to have the swap file in another partition, you don't need to worry about it.
Select the F: drive, or the letter of your new drive's primary partition. Click the Paste icon in the toolbar. You can also choose Edit/Paste or type CTRL-V. The file transfer will take place, and may take awhile depending on the size of the drive transferred.
If you have not copied the WINDOWS directory over yet, we will do so now. Switch to the WINDOWS directory. Select all files and directories except for Win386.swp (pagefile.sys in NT-based operating systems, including 2000 and XP), then proceed to paste the other files to the new drive. This will transfer all of the Windows OS files to the target drive while leaving the swap file alone.
Repeat this copy-paste procedure for any remaining data partitions you may have.
Install the Windows system files to the new drive by going to the MS-DOS prompt and typing SYS D: at the C> prompt.
Exit Windows and turn off the computer.
Swap the cable connectors going to the drives. Change the jumper settings to make the new drive master. you can make your old drive the slave if you wish to use it as a backup of your old setup. Reboot. The system should work normally, with your new drive fulfilling the same role as the old drive. If not, your old drive is still completely intact and can be used to get the system back in operation.
Using the Old Drive as Data Backup

In situations where you have upgraded the operating systemor re-installed it, you can still use your old drive as a source for your data file by attaching it as a slave to the master. First, re-install all of your software on your fresh operating system. Tweak the settings as you want them. Then, you can install your old drive as a slave to the new drive. After doing this, you will have several new drive letters available to you in Windows Explorer. You can then navigate the directories of your old drive and copy/paste individual data files (like your documents, MP3s, accounting files, etc.) from the old location to the data directories of the re-installed applications under the new operating system.

In this way, you can easily get your data files into a completely new system configuration, without necessarily having to go through the hassle of burning all of your data to CD-Rs or something of that sort.
  • ACharles
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Thanks for getting back. You lost me there. Isn't there an easier way of doing all this. I do hope I my question was clear.

The situation is my C: drive has very little memory left. I have two other drives D: & E: that I don't use at all. Is there a much easier way of achieving my objective? If so will I have to download a software?

Regards
AC
  • twiztit_momma
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Post 3+ Months Ago

There are third-party programs available which automate this process. Such programs are better if you like the security. They are also better if you perform such a transfer frequently.
Ghost is a program by Innovative Software that creates a master image file of the old drive. This image can be stored on any medium, including a network server. All you have to do is copy this image to any drive you want to use. It copies all hidden files, too. This program sounds very convenient, but is rather pricey at $500 US per copy. There is a 30-day evaluation version available.

A cheaper choice is DriveCopy by PowerQuest. It doesn't offer network support, but conveniently copies all files and settings for only $29.95 US.
  • ACharles
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Thanks a lot for your help. I will give that a try.

Best regards
AC
  • ACharles
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Has anyone used Ranish partion manager before? If so can you please guide me through transferring disk space.

Regards
AC

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