WINDOWS TRICKS & SHORTCUTS

  • ATNO/TW
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CTRL+ALT+ (any arrow key) will rotate your screen display in the direction of the arrow if your graphic card supports it.
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  • lucassix
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ATNO/TW wrote:
CTRL+ALT+ (any arrow key) will rotate your screen display in the direction of the arrow if your graphic card supports it.


Woah, just tried that on my work computer. Now to find some co-workers who forget to lock their terminals... :twisted:
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*lol -- I knew that was going to cross somebody's mind!

Yeah, some contemporary flat panel monitors and laptops screens can be physically rotated, so this feature is now being included on newer graphics cards to adjust for that.
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To shorten the step you could just hold the Windows key + R and then type explorer.
  • ozzyosb100
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ATNO/TW wrote:
To shorten the step you could just hold the Windows key + R and then type explorer.


that might not work when explorer crashes, since the start menu is part of it
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When installing more RAM don't forget to adjust the size of your paging file to reflect the new amount of ram.

If a memory dump occurs you can get a bsod complaining about ntoskrnl.exe since it's still working with the old size of paged space with more ram :wink:
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ALT + ESCAPE Minimizes Active Window.
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ATNO/TW wrote:
Since I have at times as many as 10 or more windows open at once a nifty little keyboard shortcut that instantly minimizes all open windows:

Ctrl+Esc immediately followed by Alt+M

That's my alltime favorite. I also like Windowskey+E to bring up the Windows Explorer and Windowskey+R to bring up Run. I also use Ctrl+A to select all, Ctrl+C to copy Ctrl+Z to Cut, and Ctrl+V to paste. Very convenient shortcuts when copying code and hypertext links.


Bro, just use WindowsKey + m.. and thats it... it minimize all..
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so does winkey d
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i found this one by accident :
When signing up on the hotmail page , instead of typing the full email address just type your first part of your id and then press alt + tab , this will automatically add @hotmail.com to it
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But I found not to press alt+tab even!
If you enter your id and click on the text box of password "@hotmail.com" is automatically added.
Quote:
i found this one by accident :
When signing up on the hotmail page , instead of typing the full email address just type your first part of your id and then press alt + tab , this will automatically add @hotmail.com to it



Well, a great shortcut all use is Alt+bckspace to undo events.

"Alt+Print Screen" and then "ctrl+v" in any image editor saves a copy of recent window screenshot(thats too hot).
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alt tab will take you away from the page wouldnt it? anyways, tab will get you into the password box.
shift+tab will take you back one box if you have use tab to move forward, [or even if you havent]
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Oops, haven't noticed that, just replied seeing previous message.

Yes,
not "alt+tab" but "tab" or "shift+tab".
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There are quite a few pages of shortcuts here! I wonder if these have been mentioned in theis extensive list? -

Hold down Num Lock for 10 seconds turns on "Toggle Keys" - it makes your Caps Lock, Num Lock and Scroll Lock keys beep when pressed... very useful if you hit Caps Lock instead of "A" a lot (like me)!

F7 in a browser turns on "Caret Browsing" allowing you to move the cursor ALL OVER a webpage with the keyboard. Can be useful when trying to select stuff.

AND MY ALL TIME FAVOURITE:

Press Alt+Left Shift+Print Scrn to switch on High-Contrast mode!

(This is useful to play pranks on people who aren't sitting at their workstation, because it doesn't tell you how to turn it off! Such fun was had as a student lol! :lol:
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Similarly Sticky keys are turned on by pressing 'shift' five times that enables you not to press ctrl and/or alt and/or shift and/or numlock simaltaneously where those are needed.

Also 'Filter keys' comes up by pressing 'shift' for 8 seconds.

Winkey+Break brings up the System Properties.

If you use Windows XP and apply the Alt+Tab switch power toy then by pressing alt+tab you can switch over to different opened windows whichever you want.
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HI,
Check the below site for short cuts.

http://mastiunlimited.com/navtej

I am sure you will like this site.Please ignore if you know this site.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It may have already been discussed but helpful.
Shift+F10 brings up the right-click menu.

Well, in .NET passport enabled sites hotmail is no more letting to auto insert the "@hotmail.com" beside user id. Bad!!.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

F3 is used as "Find Next" in many many programs from Wordpad,notepad to IE,regedit etc.
Its very common.
Just like "Ctrl+O" to open and "Ctrl+N" for "new".
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Minimize all window by "Win key + D" and the window in focus by "Alt+Space+N".

And a great hidden shortcut for beginners with C/C++ programming in Turbo C++. If a program falls in an infinite loop while running use "Ctrl+Numlock".

The windows shortcut keys to which respond the DOS applications are in general "Alt+Tab","Alt+PrntScrn","Ctrl+Esc","Alt+Esc","Alt+Enter","PrntScrn" etc.

Use "Ctrl" to point out mouse pointer. The option is at Start>Control Panel>Printers and other hardware>Mouse>Pointer Option>check "Show location of pointer when I press CTRL key".

Well, these are all that all know.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ATNO/TW wrote:
Since I have at times as many as 10 or more windows open at once a nifty little keyboard shortcut that instantly minimizes all open windows:

Ctrl+Esc immediately followed by Alt+M

That's my alltime favorite. I also like Windowskey+E to bring up the Windows Explorer and Windowskey+R to bring up Run. I also use Ctrl+A to select all, Ctrl+C to copy Ctrl+Z to Cut, and Ctrl+V to paste. Very convenient shortcuts when copying code and hypertext links.


Isn't it Ctrl-X to cut? Ctrl-Z to undo.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Yes Ctrl+X to cut and Ctrl+Z or Alt+Bckspace to undo.
Not
Quote:
Ctrl+Z to Cut
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Post 3+ Months Ago

haha, i just looked through 20 pages of shortcuts....wooh!

umm...for this baby

vAs wrote:
oops i forgot this one, i use all the time...

win button + e > alt + t > o > file types > go down to N/A - Folder

Advanced > New >
Action :- View In Dos >
Application :- cmd.exe /k cd /d %1

Now right click any desktop icon and it takes you straight there in DOS.

Keep tweaks coming guys these are a good read

vAs


i did that jsut to see what would happen, and now I cant remove it. any idea how to accomplish that?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

LOL!!!

Why do you need to remove that?
Isn't that great?

Well, if you want to remove do this

Start>Run>type "regedit".

Now navigate to this key "HK_Classes_Root\Folder\Shell.
You should find there the key "view_in_dos" if you gave the name of the action menu handler "View in DOS".
Delete that key and all its sub-keys.

You will get the relief from that. But I like to keep that there. It acts like XP powertoy "Open Command Windows here". Isn't that?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Has anybody given a look at this?

http://support.microsoft.com/default.as ... -us;301583
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A Quick Helpful Hint For Those Whos Address Bar in Internet Explorer Is Gone.

First Off Try Right Clicking On A Blank Spot At The Top In I.E. And Making Sure Address Bar Is Checked

Second If It is and the address bar is still gone click
Start
Run
REGSVR32 /i BROWSEUI.DLL
Then Restart and the address bar should be back to normal.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ATNO/TW wrote:
toniovega wrote:
how wud you make a shortcut for hibernation on the desktop?


You can do this (at least with XP) -- right click an empty space on your desktop and select "new" then "shortcut"

highlight and copy the following:
C:\WINDOWS\system32\rundll32.exe powrprof.dll,SetSuspendState Hibernate

Paste it into where it says: "Type the location of the item"
Click "Next"

Type a name for the shortcut and click finish.


*notes -- I did this using XP Pro. On my system the WINDOWS directory is WINNT so if you get an alert message that says C:\WINDOWS\system32\rundll32.exe cannot be found try changing WINDOWS to WINNT -- I did this twice and it worked both times. If you get any errors post the exact errors in a new post and reference these instructions.


I did this for windows xp and when i tried it out it worked fine. However, when i restarted my computer it rearranged all my desktop icons and changed my windows display. for the maximize and minimize buttons i used to have the up arrow and down arrows now it's the regular minimize and maximize buttons. How do i go about changing that back. please Help.
EDIT: I'm a computer noob, disregard. It's taken care of. However, why did my desktop icons all rearrange and i lost some settings?
  • staal_mannen
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hi guys. Thanks for all the tips. Didn't have the time to scan through all the pages to see if anyone has already submitted this, but here's a good one that I like(in WinXP):

Creating custom keyboard shortcuts:

1. Create a shortcut to some favorite folder of yours on the desktop(e.g. right click the desired folder and choose send to->desktop(as shortcut)

2.Right click this shortcut and choose properties

3.In the dialog that appears there's a field called Keyboard shortcut(or something similar, my WinXP is norwegian:)

4.Press some key combination that you'd like, and hit OK. You've just created a custom keyboard shortcut!

I use my new keyboard shortcuts all the time, pointing them to things like My Documents, my primary harddisk, Program Files, notepad, etc:
Ctrl-Alt-P --- Program files
Ctrl-Alt-Z --- My documetns
Ctrl-Alt-N --- Notepad, etc....

If you keep the shortcut lying on your desktop, you can use the keyboard shortcut from any program. If you move it away from the desktop it stops working:( (i think, let me know otherwise). I've tried setting the "Hidden " properties on these shortcuts to keep them from cluttering my desktop, but this actually made them stop working the next time i rebooted. I haven't really found much info about this feature, so if anyone has some experience to share, feel free to.

The uncool thing about this Windows feature is that it doesn't seem to recognize the Windows button, so the keyboard shortcut must be some Ctrl-Alt-combination. Let me know if you find any workarounds for this...

Cheers
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Post 3+ Months Ago

hey heres one i bet you didn't know lol (actually i didn't until i read this and got hooked on trying to find new ones) when you are in any window of windows hold
ctrl and left click on the things in there and it will let you select more than one, holding shift and clicking will highlight all the items in between, and i don't know what alt does, but you can try it
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I am not sure if this really belongs here, and pardon me if it has already been posted, but at 21 pages, I haven't yet finished reading through them.

You can create your own Run commands by making a shortcut and naming it to what you want the command to be, then moving the shortcut to your windows directory.

EX:
Make a new shortcut for Notepad on the desktop and rename it to np.
Cut shortcut np and move it to C:\Windows
Now enter np into the Run dialog box and hit enter. It should pop up Notepad.


This can be useful to make shortcuts for the other run commands such as devmgmt.msc for the device manager.
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20 things you didn't know about Windows XP


You've read the reviews and digested the key feature enhancements and operational changes. Now it's time to delve a bit deeper and uncover some of Windows XP's secrets.

1. It boasts how long it can stay up. Whereas previous versions of Windows were coy about how long they went between boots, XP is positively proud of its stamina. Go to the Command Prompt in the Accessories menu from the All Programs start button option, and then type 'systeminfo'. The computer will produce a lot of useful info, including the uptime. If you want to keep these, type 'systeminfo > info.txt'. This creates a file called info.txt you can look at later with Notepad. (Professional Edition only).

2. You can delete files immediately, without having them move to the Recycle Bin first. Go to the Start menu, select Run... and type ' gpedit.msc'; then select User Configuration, Administrative Templates, Windows Components, Windows Explorer and find the Do not move deleted files to the Recycle Bin setting. Set it. Poking around in gpedit will reveal a great many interface and system options, but take care – some may stop your computer behaving as you wish. (Professional Edition only).

3. You can lock your XP workstation with two clicks of the mouse. Create a new shortcut on your desktop using a right mouse click, and enter 'rundll32.exeuser32.dll, LockWorkStation' in the location field. Give the shortcut a name you like. That's it -- just
double click on it and your computer will be locked. And if that's not easy enough, Windows key + L will do the same.

4. XP hides some system software you might want to remove, such as Windows Messenger, but you can tickle it and make it disgorge everything. Using Notepad or
Edit, edit the text file /windows/inf/sysoc.inf, search for the word 'hide' and remove it. You can then go to the Add or Remove Programs in the Control Panel, select Add/Remove Windows Components and there will be your prey, exposed and vulnerable.

5. For those skilled in the art of DOS batch files, XP has a number of interesting new commands. These include 'eventcreate' and 'eventtriggers' for creating and watching system events, 'typeperf' for monitoring performance of various subsystems, and 'schtasks' for handling scheduled tasks. As usual, typing the command name followed by /? will give a list of options -- they're all far too baroque to go into here.

6. XP has IP version 6 support -- the next generation of IP. Unfortunately this is more than your ISP has, so you can only experiment with this on your LAN. Type 'ipv6 install' into Run... (it's OK, it won't ruin your existing network setup) and then 'ipv6 /?' at the
command line to find out more. If you don't know what IPv6 is, don't worry and don't bother.

7. You can at last get rid of tasks on the computer from the command line by using 'taskkill /pid' and the task number, or just 'tskill' and the process number. Find that out by typing 'tasklist', which will also tell you a lot about what's going on in your system.

8. XP will treat Zip files like folders, which is nice if you've got a fast machine. On slower machines, you can make XP leave zip files well alone by typing 'regsvr32 /u zipfldr.dll' at the command line. If you change your mind later, you can put things back as they were by typing 'regsvr32 zipfldr.dll'.

9. XP has ClearType -- Microsoft's anti-aliasing font display technology -- but doesn't have it enabled by default. It's well worth trying, especially if you were there for DOS and all those years of staring at a screen have given you the eyes of an astigmatic bat.
To enable ClearType, right click on the desktop, select Properties, Appearance, Effects, select ClearType from the second drop-down menu and enable the selection. Expect best results on laptop displays. If you want to use ClearType on the Welcome login screen as well, set the registry entry HKEY_USERS/.DEFAULT/ControlPanel/Desktop/FontSmoothingType to 2.

10. You can use Remote Assistance to help a friend who's using network address translation (NAT) on a home network, but not automatically. Get your pal to email you a Remote Assistance invitation and edit the file. Under the RCTICKET attribute will be a NAT IP address, like 192.168.1.10. Replace this with your chum's real IP address -- they can find this out by going to http://www.whatismyip.com -- and get them to make sure that they've got port 3389 open on their firewall and forwarded to the errant computer.

11. You can run a program as a different user without logging out and back in again. Right click the icon, select Run As... and enter the user name and password you want to use. This only applies for that run. The trick is particularly useful if you need to have
administrative permissions to install a program, which many require. Note that you can have some fun by running programs multiple times on the same system as different users, but this can have unforeseen effects.

12. Windows XP can be very insistent about you checking for auto updates, registering a Passport, using Windows Messenger and so on. After a while, the nagging goes away, but if you feel you might slip the bonds of sanity before that point, run Regedit, go to HKEY_CURRENT_USER/Software/Microsoft/Windows/CurrentVersion/Explorer/Advanced and create a DWORD value called EnableBalloonTips with a value of 0.

13. You can start up without needing to enter a user name or password. Select Run... from the start menu and type 'control userpasswords2', which will open the user accounts application. On the Users tab, clear the box for Users Must Enter A User Name And Password To Use This Computer, and click on OK. An Automatically Log On dialog box will appear; enter the user name and password for the account you want to use.

14. Internet Explorer 6 will automatically delete temporary files, but only if you tell it to. Start the browser, select Tools / Internet Options... and Advanced, go down to the Security area and check the box to Empty Temporary Internet Files folder when
browser is closed.

15. XP comes with a free Network Activity Light, just in case you can't see the LEDs twinkle on your network card. Right click on My Network Places on the desktop, then select Properties. Right click on the description for your LAN or dial-up connection, select Properties, then check the Show icon in notification area when connected box. You'll now see a tiny network icon on the right of your task bar that glimmers nicely during network traffic.

16. The Start Menu can be leisurely when it decides to appear, but you can speed things along by changing the registry entry HKEY_CURRENT_USER/ControlPanel/Desktop/MenuShowDelay from the default 400 to something a little snappier. Like 0.

17. You can rename loads of files at once in Windows Explorer. Highlight a set of files in a window, then right click on one and rename it. All the other files will be renamed to that name, with individual numbers in brackets to distinguish them. Also, in a folder you
can arrange icons in alphabetised groups by View, Arrange Icon By... Show In Groups.

18. Windows Media Player will display the cover art for albums as it plays the tracks -- if it found the picture on the Internet when you copied the tracks from the CD. If it didn't, or if you have lots of pre-WMP music files, you can put your own copy of the cover art in the same directory as the tracks. Just call it folder.jpg and Windows Media Player will pick it up and display it.

19. Windows key + Break brings up the System Properties dialogue box; Windows key + D brings up the desktop; Windows key + Tab moves through the taskbar buttons.

20. The next release of Windows XP, codenamed Longhorn, is due out late next year or early 2006 and won't be much to write home about. The next big release is codenamed Blackcomb and will be out in 2003/2007
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