Buying new camera.

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Post 3+ Months Ago

I am interested in purchasing a new camera. MY current camera is a:
FujiFilm - FinePixA200 2.0 MegaPixels


It is FAR from great. But it was my first digicam when they first came out.
I am looking for a REALLY good one. Hopefully 5.0 MegaPixel
I tend to take nature shots, close up, and some indoor/stage shots. So I also need something that has zoom. I am looking to spend anyhting from $100 - $450..

I liked this one:
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product. ... 959%3A4468

and this one:
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product. ... id=3932488

Also:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Kodak-EasyShare-Z70 ... dZViewItem
Any suggesstions?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

the canon sure shots are a great buy as well here is the one i suggested for my mom to buy because she could not use my rebel too complicated for her to use.

http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=145&modelid=12072

this camera is a really good camera that i have looked at for ease of use and the features that it has on it a well as it is fairly cheap right in your price range on the top end.

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Post 3+ Months Ago

For that kind of money, I'd probably pick up a low end DSLR (especially if you're looking for "a really good one".

"Really good one" and $100-450 usually don't go together, but people have different definitions of "good".

For me, "Good" is the Nikon D200 which costs about $1700, but to D2x owners, well, like I said, "good" is all relative.

Three specific models I'd suggest you check out are the Nikon D50, the Canon 300D Rebel and the Canon 350D Rebel XT (if you *must* buy new).

If you're able to tackle the used market and pick up a better quality system for less money, you could try a Nikon D100, Nikon D70, or a Canon 10D.

All of those would give you EXCELLENT results compared to ANY point-n-shoot digital camera.

It's going to cost a little more than you specified to get you going, but once you've got the camera itself, you can spend as little or as much as you like on improving your setup over time.

Having a DSLR is like building your own PC (vs. buying a HP or Compaq). If you don't like your current lens(es), tripod, filters, etc. You just go buy a better lens, higher quality filters, carbon tripod if you want it, or whatever else and add it to your existing setup.

With a point-n-shoot, you're limited to a single built-in lens (which is almost always going to be a zoom, which are naturally not as good quality as good primes - fixed focal length).

You could pick up a used Rebel for less than $450 if you really shop around. A used D100 or D70 will be around $500-600 (although you'll often get a cheap lens thrown in the deal so you can shoot right away).

If not, just go to http://www.keh.com or http://www.bhphoto.com and order yourself a nice basic lens to get you going.

For Nikon the 18-70DX lens is perfect (used you can pick 'em up for around $150-200, new around $300). It gives a good quality range of focal lengths, it's not a very fast lens, but it's fast enough if your body is set to ISO400 (or even 800+ if you use Noise Ninja, NeatImage, some other post-processing technique, or can deal with in-camera noise reduction - which isn't too bad on the Nikons).

If you want to pick up a good sharp fast lens, try the Nikon 50mm f/1.8D. Those are less than 100 bucks brand new, and outstanding quality for the money. It's not quite as nice as the 50mm f/1.4D, but then, the f/1.8D doesn't cost $270 either.

As far as Canon, I've no idea what are the comparable equivalent lenses (quality-wise), as I don't shoot Canon, but I'm sure somebody will chime in with suggestions.

Whatever route you choose to take, whether it be P&S or DSLR, I'd suggest looking at sample photos on http://www.steves-digicams.com and then once you've narrowed it down to cameras with a level fo quality you're happy with, hit the local stores (Ritz, BestBuy, Circuit City, wherever) and just pick them up in your hands and feel them.

It doesn't matter how good the quality is if the camera doesn't feel "right' once it's in your hands. For example, the Canon 20D is an excellent camera, and ALMOST convinced me to switch. I used a friend's, and was blown away by the quality (of course, it did have a $1,000 lens on the end and good quality flash) but it just doesn't feel right in my hands. Every Nikon I've ever picked up just feels right. Conversely, a camera that feels good, but takes crap photos is also something you don't want.

That's why I love Steve's Digicams. Quick sample photos to eliminate cameras off your list. If it shoots like crap, you don't need to go any further with your investigation fo that model.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

yeppers i agree with AXE ther in everything he said there. the only difference in AXE and I is that I do shot canon and he shoots Nikon. I just bought a new body and and lens and they cost me 2,000 for the both of them, about 1,000 for each of them. I originally bought a Canon Rebel and did not like the way the Canon Rebel xt felt in my hands until I started to really shot alot of pictures at one time and in a small space for action sports. I then bought a Canon Rebel XT this week and I like te feel of the camera better now than I did a year ago. I hang around the local ritz camera store in my local town and i see alot of ZLR cameras come into the store and the motor that make the lens move out and back breaks down and they have to be repaired or shipped off. I love my SLR and would not trade almost any money for them unless i could buy the next one up from what I have now :)

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Post 3+ Months Ago

I loved my D100, but I still traded it for a snake (of course, the snake was worth twice as much as the camera at the time, heh).

I just picked up another D100 (I was gonna wait and get a D200, but I was made an offer I couldn't refuse). I'm still saving for a D200 :)

Btw, the only real issues I hear about with DSLRs are back-focusing (D70), shutter mechanisms needing replacing, banding issues (D200).

The D70 & D200 mentioned there were problems with the initial batch of cameras. Recent batches are free of these problems.

If you go to buy a D200 or D70 used, just be sure to ask about those problems. Also check how many actuations it's shot if you buy used. Most DSLRs come with a shutter life of around 50,000 actuations (shots). My D100 had around 65,000 actuations and was still going strong. The one I just picked up has around 24,000 actuations and works beautifully.

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