Digital photography for web products

  • zoi
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  • zoi
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have got myself a website and would like to take photographs of dresses and other clothing that i will be selling. I have two studio lights and a white sheet of cloth to use as a background but no idea on how to position and use these to take photographs. I also have a lot of reflection on my mannequin face. How do i resolve this issue? :?
Please help!
  • Anonymous
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • Belk Media Group
  • Graphic Monk
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Position the lights so that they do not shine directly on the manequin or you could adjust the brightness and contrast in PS.
  • zoi
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  • zoi
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Post 3+ Months Ago

when i position the lights away from the mannequin there is a shadow and the dress details seem to more faded
  • Belk Media Group
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  • Loc: In the heart of California, Fresno.

Post 3+ Months Ago

Hmmm, try repositioning the head (tilt it down or up). Are your lights at eye level to the manny. Try raising them up and angle them down. This is all speculation I am not a pro photographer and I never shot a manny. You might want to ask AXE
  • ATNO/TW
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Use the same concept as video. You need three lights to really make it work well. A main front light. A top (or sidelight also referred to as a fill light) and a backlight.

Actually as poorly designed website as it is this is a pretty good resource for lighting. http://zimmer.csufresno.edu/~candace/Basic1.htm

Mind you that's for TV, but in reality real photography isn't a whole lot different.
  • lakelandprinting
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  • lakelandprinting
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  • Loc: Lakeland, Florida

Post 3+ Months Ago

I found the best way to take digital pictures of products is with the good old sunshine. I bought one of those "ebox" studios. What a waste of money that was. If you look at my business cards (and enlarge) you will see the grain of the paper. I realize I have to redo all of them (because I'm my worst critic), but I'mm off to a good start: http://www.lakeland-printing.com
  • pulpmojo
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Post 3+ Months Ago

light modifiers are realy important, otherwise you start getting really harsh shadows and excessive glare. Do you have a decent sized soft box or umbrella, if not, no problem, try bouncing the lights from a white (or at least neutral) wall and/or ceiling. As far as positioning the lights. There is an almost infinate number of possibilities depending on how creative you want to get and what kind of effect you want, but the most traditional way of placing the lights is by placing the main light either directly in front and above the subject with a reflector or something similar below, bouncing light up into the shadowed area. Or with the main light about 20 to 45 degrees to the left or right of the subject with a bounce or second light filling in the other side of the subject.
  • cinema88
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Post 3+ Months Ago

yeah ... it's true .. :))

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