"Hummingbird don't fly away..."

  • ATNO/TW
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Ever try to catch a hummingbird photo? If you're ever in need of a lesson on patience, I recommend trying it some time. I caught this little fellow last evening after about 30 minutes of trial and error and about 40 pictures.
Attachments:
hb1.jpg

In Flight
Copyright ATNOProductions 2008


Attachments:
hb2.jpg

In Flight Cropped Closeup
Copyright ATNOProductions 2008


Attachments:
hb3.jpg

Perched (You don't see this everyday)!
Copyright ATNOProductions 2008


Attachments:
hb4.jpg

Perched Cropped Closeup
Copyright ATNOProductions 2008

  • Anonymous
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • SB
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Nicely captured. I can only imagine how difficult that would have been.

What camera did you use?

In regards to the "ever tried to capture one" question? no is the answer. We don't actually get hummingbirds in the wild here.
  • ATNO/TW
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It's a Kodak Z650 Zoom Digital Camera.
Shutter Speed 1/1000
Exposure Manual
F-Stop f/3.6
Aperature f/3.5
ISO Speed 200
Focal Length 28mm
Flash Fired.

(I did do an "Auto Levels" adjustment in PS, but that was the only alteration to the original)

Here's the exif xmp file contents if you're interested:
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  • mantonino
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Post 3+ Months Ago

One thing that would help is to turn your ISO up to 400. This would give you much more ambient light, less "flash" look. :) I like the capture and yes, I've tried hummingbirds. Thankfully my daily subjects aren't as tough!
  • ATNO/TW
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Post 3+ Months Ago

mantonino, thanks for the tip on the ISO. Honestly, it was the first time I had ever used the manual settings on that camera, and was figuring settings out on the fly and was happy to get what I did. What was most funny was I had a hard time remembering how the F-stops ran. Last time I used an SLR was nearly 20 years ago, and 30 years since my photography classes.
  • righteous_trespasser
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ATNO/TW wrote:
figuring settings out on the fly

Nice ATNO ... for that comment and the photos ...
  • neksus
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Post 3+ Months Ago

@mantonino - I always shoot as low an ISO I can with a +2/3 adjustment; my flash is set to -2/3 to avoid the harsh and is used more as a fill.
  • George L.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have not much knowledge about ISO, but these are sure Great photos I will look again, many times.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ISO is sometimes also referred to as film speed. In essence it's the sensitivity of the film to light. The higher the ISO, the lower light you can shoot in. In other words, 100 or 200 ISO, are typically ideal for outside daylight shots, where 400 is more apt to be used indoors. 800 and 1000 are fast film speeds for low light shooting such as twilight or night or rapid motion shots such as sports, however, on real film you risk the pictures being grainy at higher ISO's. Digital cameras essentially emulate the ISO's of real film. In real film you could also push the film speed - in other words you could shoot on ISO 100 film but push the camera settings to 400 and develop it at 400. It's been so long though I can't recall off the top of my head what the purpose of that was.
  • neksus
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Post 3+ Months Ago

For what it's worth, film speeds were referred to as ASA and the ISO numbers were based off those. I have no idea why you'd push the film or even how that would work, not having used much film in my time ;)
  • vitalink
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I love hummingbirds! My husband actually held one and saved it........the sugar water had gotten on the outside of the feeder after some strong winds.......we looked outside and a hummingbird was stuck to the feeder and could not move......my husband gently removed him, washed him off and let him go......it was incredible.......

Great pictures:-)
  • ATNO/TW
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Post 3+ Months Ago

What a wonderful story! Thanks for sharing that.

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