MASSIVE database programming....solutions?

  • optimus prime
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Post 3+ Months Ago

MySQL, Oracle, Access?

My company and I are building an online service for financial and consulting businesses. The task at hand calls for a massive and complex database that can be accessed by hundreds of users at once.

Here is our problem, what product should we use for our solution? PHP and MySQL are looking very temping because of there low price tag(free). As of right now, we have no funding. To recieve funding, we first have to build a minimal working prototype.

Oracle, MicrosoftSQL/ASP, ColdFusion and MySQL/php are what we are considering. We have a team of 3 coders, and none of us have experience with oracle or Coldfusion, so we have to factor that in. But to me(all of us really), programming is programming, any way you look at it. I come from a c++ background and just recently got into web/database development.

We're trying to do as much research as possible, but I'd like to hear what you guys think.

thanks.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

1st I'd cross out Access as a possibility. I tried an ASP version of this type of forum about a year or so ago and used an Access database. The proggy was good and worked well enough, but Access only allows for up to about 25 simultaneous users (if I remember what I read correctly). I ran into all kinds of problems with it, the primary one was a bunch of error messages, and the pages not displaying because of the "demand" on the database.

SQL does much better. I've not tried it with ASP yet, but PHP works without a hitch.

The next thing to consider is that ASP is essentially a Microsoft product. To use it most effectively, you should be doing it on Microsoft servers. PHP appears to work well with Linux or Unix servers, and so far I have found it difficult to find a host privider for a domain that supports both. So your solution may be dictated but what servers the domain will be on.

I'm not an expert at any of this and only learned PHP to an almost intermediate level in the last month. I hope some of what I said helps.
  • nuclei
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Post 3+ Months Ago

#1. If this is finacial data I would go with either MySQL, PostGreSQL, or Oracle.
#2. If the database is going to grow fast and as huge as you make it sound, I would definately go with Oracle or PostGreSQL.


Hope that helps.
  • tierra
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Post 3+ Months Ago

What makes you think MySQL can't handle the growth? MySQL was built for millions of queries a second. I would be more worried about PHP being able to handle it... obviosly Apache will do fine, so as long as it's a fast system, and you've installed some PHP accelerators, the Apache/MySQL/PHP solution should work just fine with plenty of room for expansion.

I've build MySQL databases very complex, and databases simple but HUGE (and I'm talking about 4GB databases). Both with reasonable results with PHP.
  • nuclei
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I take it you have never used oracle?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Ok, you don't have funding now... but how much funding do you expect to get in the future? Because...Oracle is very powerful, but it is also very expensive. And do any of the people on your development team have any database experience? Any experience modeling data? Maintaining a database? If you get Oracle, then you are probably going to need an Oracle DBA at some point. And they are not cheap either.

I would say for prototyping purposes...slap together an ACCESS database and use ColdFusion. If you are C++ programmers and know HTML, then you could pick up CF in a couple of months. Seriously...It is one of the best, easiest languages to work with.

Then when you get funding...Hire a DBA to help you with this project. If you are going to stay on the windows platform, then I'd use SQL Server if funding is tight. SQL Server is just about as good as Oracle, and a lot cheaper.

And you can use stored procedures in SQL to do your number crunching. For the development language, then I'd probably stick with CF. Just make sure you do as much as possible in the stored procedures, not in CF.

I've seen many projects fail, and they blamed it on the developer, the programming language, the server... And it was really just a poorly designed database from the start!
  • billstack
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Post 3+ Months Ago

As for getting up and running quickly with a minimal cost to you (both $$ and time) I would use PHP with MySQL. I am a programmer by trade, and as such have had plenty of experience with C++ and the like. However, until quite recently I have not delved deeply into web/database programming.

Over the past summer I used PHP/MySQL on a linux box, and my experience was that I setup Apache, PHP, MySQL, and the latest security patches in less than one day. I also found it extremely easy to learn PHP - the PHP site has plenty of online documentation (with many forums full of useful advice).

Database administration is also very easy with the free phpMyAdmin tool. The only thing I don't have experience with is truly massive databases. The one thing I can offer here is that the MySQL documentation says that without patches, the file size limit (and hence table size limit) is 2GB. Patches can be applied to some filesystems to allow larger tables.

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