Advice on building web server

  • satimis
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hi folks,

I'm planning to build a web server on following PC;

CPU Athlon 64 3000+
RAM 1024M
HD SATA II 160G
OS Ubuntu on the server
http://www.ubuntu.com/server

Please advise what will be the best arrangement on the size of each of following partitions;

/dev/sda1 /boot
/dev/sda2 /
/dev/vg/home
/dev/vg/usr
/dev/vg/var
/dev/vg/tmp
/dev/sda4 swap

Any suggestion on above LVM order? In following order?
/usr
/home
/var
/tmp

Is "Ubuntu on the server" easy to configure?


Apache, MySQL and PHP come with "Ubuntu on the server" as default. What will be your opinion on MySQL vs PostgreSQL?


If allowing visitors sending webmail direct on the server what package will you recommend.

TIA


B.R.
satimis
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • this213
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Rather than write a book containing everything you're asking for, I'll simply tell you not to use Ubuntu as a server, that's a desktop OS. Use something like CentOS or Gentoo for this. If you use CentOS, enable the CentOSPlus repository in /etc/yum.repos.d/CentOS-Base.repo.

Your database files will be stored under /var and your web files will be wherever you define them in your /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf, consider this when partitioning your drives. You should never need more than 100M for /boot or 8Gigs for / no matter how much useless stuff you install on a server.

Lastly, never, under any circumstances, install X Windows on a live production server. Though there may not be any particular security holes or the like, it's just a waste of space and a potential for problems should X crash or something.

Apache, MySQL and PHP come with just about every distro, you just have to use the package manager to install it. Under CentOS this is "yum", under Gentoo, it's "emerge".

The difference between MySQL and Postgres is that MySQL is fast while Postgres is geared more toward enterprise databases (allowing things like tablespaces (which MySQL supports some of) and real foreign keys - which allow cascade operations and the like).

For email, you only really have 2 choices, qmail and Postfix. Both of these are enterprise grade and both can be plugged into SpamAssassin and Clam AV (which you definitely want to do). Use Squirrelmail for your webmail interface and either dovecot or courier for your pop/imap server.

As to being "easy to configure", some of it is, some isn't. Your certainly going to have to do some reading. I happen to think running the fuel rack on a 71 Series Detroit is really easy, but most certified diesel techs wouldn't agree. Find something that works for you and try to understand it is the best advice I could give you here. If you decide to use Gentoo, they have very detailed documentation on how to set all of this up using that distro.
  • satimis
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hi this213,

Tks for your advice.

Quote:
Rather than write a book containing everything you're asking for, I'll simply tell you not to use Ubuntu as a server, that's a desktop OS. Use something like CentOS or Gentoo for this. If you use CentOS, enable the CentOSPlus repository in /etc/yum.repos.d/CentOS-Base.repo.

This is a test to gain knowledge on building a webserver. I never did it before.

On the first round I'll test "Ubuntu as a server". I suppose it is easy to configure.


On the 2nd round I'll run CentOS as OS. I heard CentOS before strong for server. I also heard nPath and SLES but no knowledge on them.


Quote:
Your database files will be stored under /var and your web files will be wherever you define them in your /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf, consider this when partitioning your drives. You should never need more than 100M for /boot or 8Gigs for / no matter how much useless stuff you install on a server.

Would it be appropriate to keep web files on /home? Is there another suggestion?

I'll abundon /boot because I won't need multi-boot. Now I revised my planning as follow;

/
swap 2G
/home
/var

The rest will go to /

Quote:
Lastly, never, under any circumstances, install X Windows on a live production server. Though there may not be any particular security holes or the like, it's just a waste of space and a potential for problems should X crash or something.

Yes, I heard something about it. Some folks on Internet suggested connecting a workstation to the server to do remote-configuration on X-window running on the workstation. Where can I find documentation on this respect.


Others noted with tks.


B.R.
satimis
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Do not abandon /boot - this is where your kernel is kept and it's best to have this on its own partition

You can store web folders wherever you want them. Sane places would be /var/www, /srv/www, srv/httpd or /home/user_account/www. According to the FHS, they should be under /srv somewhere.

You should be able to find configuration documentation from the web site for whichever distribution you're using or from the web site of the package you're trying to configure - so for Apache, you can either try ubuntu.com or apache.org as an example.

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