Best Redhat Distro for Server?

  • EngLee
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If I'm would like to install redhat to a server, which distro is the best?

I've tried redhat9, but I get negative comments by some people. What is the best recommendation if cost is an factor for me. (Redhat Enterprise is quite costly for me, as a beginner). Please advise.

http://lifeasprogrammer.blogspot.com/2005/06/redhat-9.html
  • WNxGratefulJed
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If your just starting out then Fedora Core 4 is an ok choice. Unlike some red hat distros, Fedora is free so that should fit nicely into your cost concerns. I too am a bit of a Linux noob so you might want to consider some of the more experienced users post before just jumping to Fedora. They might know a better one then me.

What I do know about all distros of Linux is that some people have their favorites and absolutly refuse to use any other distros. This means that going by what others say is not always accurate due to the sometimes extreme bias towards some of the distros. Your best bet is just to try a bunch of the distros and see which ones you like the best. Keep in mind though that some distros are better suited toward a particular task then others.
  • EngLee
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Though cost effective is my concern, I would like to know whether Fedora Core suitable for servers? Is there any RH servers running on Fedora. Or what I can see out there running on RH9 or earlier? Or all of them are Enterprise edition?

Thanks for your information, WNxGratefulJed. :)
  • theak
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Fedora 3 is probably a better bet choice than 4 as Four is a bit buggy in places and there is less support out there (although given time I'm sure this situation will resolve itself). There's certainly no reason you can't use Fedora.
  • EngLee
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Does that mean that there's already online server running on Fedora Core 3?
  • theak
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Post 3+ Months Ago

My server has been running Fedora 3 with no problems.
  • EngLee
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Do you need to update your server to Fedora Core 4?

What are the significant problems if you don't update?
  • theak
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Between FC3 and FC4 there aren't really any major changes. FC4 does come with newer versions of PHP and MySQL, but you can upgrade them without upgrading to FC4 so I don't see any real need to use the newer core. I'm currently running FC4 on my desktop and FC3 on my laptop and on my server and at the moment I feel FC4 is still a bit buggy either for a difficult install (laptop) or for a system that needs to remain stable (server). I will upgrade at some point, but I'd like to give them a little longer to sort things out.
  • theak
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
The following list includes brief summaries of some of the more significant aspects of Fedora Core 4:

Fedora Core 4 contains the following changes:

Support for the PowerPC (PPC) architecture.

GCC 4.0

GNOME 2.10

KDE 3.4 — includes new accessibility features. You can manage these new features in KDS Control CenterRegional & AccessibilityAccessibility.

Native Eclipse 3.1M6 (part of a free Java stack)

MySQL 4.1

PHP 5.0

Xen 2 (virtualization to run multiple versions of an OS)

GFS 6.1-0.pre22 (cluster file system)

Evince 0.2.1 (universal document viewer)

GDM 2.6 - Includes early login capability

SELinux — This release includes coverage for 80 new daemons by the targeted policy. There are changes to the handling of Booleans. The targeted policy is enabled by default. For more information, refer to: http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/selinux-faq/. This is the complete list of daemons covered by the targeted policy:


http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/release-notes/fc4/errata/
  • xtc
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Post 3+ Months Ago

For a server operating system I would try and stear clear of fedora.* simply because the update cycle is too fast for many production servers meaning that you have to rely on legacy support after only a very short period of time. There are many whitebox enterprise linux offerings from whiteboxenterprise to centOS. These tend to be fairly good and you can use yum to keep them updated.

Personally I try and stear clear of any redhat* distribution simiply because they are often so dependancy screwed with backporting of patches and the likes that it makes it a *plum* to manage when you need to do things like customise your php install. On a stock Enterprise Linux v3 system try and upgrade to phpv5 for example. It can become very tricky if your not familure with whats going on and how things work.
  • placid psychosis
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Post 3+ Months Ago

*Best* RH server would be RH Enterprise. It's built to be a server from the ground up.

Fedora is a mix and match distro. It has a little of everything. It's fine as a server, but you have to rely on the community for support. RH support won't touch it, since it's the free "community developed" edition. That said, I still run FC2 on many of my customers' servers. Nice and stable, not had any trouble or complaints yet.

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