Brand new to Linux, How do you install applications?

  • jiggle-o
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Post 3+ Months Ago

and with that being asked where might I find a good list of ones to choose from? I've been looking for a week with nothing really standing out.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You're going to have to be a little more specific but just to give you a very basic idea, installations can be done by installing a package or by compiling source code and creating an executable. Both of those methods have specific steps. Unfortunately, they can not be explained in one post. May I suggest the Linux Documentation Project? Search google for it. I'm sure you'll find it.
As to what to install, it's all up to you based on what you want the computer to do.
  • Abdussamad
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Post 3+ Months Ago

For a list of applications you can always visit http://freshmeat.net/.
  • datums
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Lets start out with what distribution are you using ?
RedHat, CentOS, SUSE, Debian

CentOS and RedHat have a very simple installer called YUM
it's as easy as yum install package.

Debian has a package / application installer called apt-get
it's as easy as apt-get install package.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Don2007 wrote:
...Both of those methods have specific steps. Unfortunately, they can not be explained in one post...

Aww, come on Don - thats a lie. lol datums at least attempted it :P


we do need to know what distribution you're running. the distro will have something called a package management system, it's like Windows Update, except you use it to install all of your software instead of just security updates and drivvers for the OS. suse has a system manager which has the package manager as a part of it and thats called YaST. you can usually get and install yum / apt for whatever distribution you're using, but the default ones for rpm based distro's is usually yum, especially if they're based on fedora. distributions based on debian, such as k/x/ubuntu all have the apt package manager and usually come with a gui so you dont have to know all of the commands to install software via cli. unix based distributions have a different package management system, but its the same basic concept. depending on which distro you're using :]
compiling from source is rarely necessary unless you want a piece of software which has just been released and there's not yet a package for it. but usually all you have to do to compile your own software from source is download the source, open a terminal, cd to/the/directory
where you downloaded the software, enter: ./configure , hope that it doesn't fail because if it does it means you need to install some library you're missing. when configure finishes successfully, you'd usually enter: make && make check
if that succeeds you would continue the installation by entering su & the root password and: make install
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

LOL AnarchY You're right, I'm just lazy when it comes to typing all that.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

hahah yeaaa.. it happens to the best of us ^_^

also, i forgot to mention that inside the package manager you will be able to view all installed software, all software that has an update for it, and all available software.
  • Abdussamad
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And if this whole process fails then you'll find yourself in a little place called dependency hell.
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Dependency hell is one of the reasons I went back to FreeBSD. If a dependency is needed it automatically attempts to locate it by FTP, download it and install it.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Don2007 wrote:
Dependency hell is one of the reasons I went back to FreeBSD. If a dependency is needed it automatically attempts to locate it by FTP, download it and install it.


lolz.. yea, and thats different from fedora/suse/ubuntu how? :] if they have a dependency problem they check the database of available software and if it's unavailable, you're in hell. then you have to go somewhere like rpm.pbone.net & download it from there because theres only 1 source for the rpm. its lame :(
dependency hell is your worst nightmare.
never go there..
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If there is only one source for those packages, that's pretty bad. FreeBSD FT Pees all over the place to find the file and it's rare that it doesn't. When it finds it, it stops peeing.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

eh.. i can only remember 2 instances in 4 years where thats happened.
& i tend to do more than the n00bs/average user :] lol
  • X3ndou
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I've never been in dependency hell, and I've been using linux for about two years.

Currently I use Debian GNU/Linux Sid on an AMD64 machine. Ubuntu is based off of Debian and they both use the Aptitude package management system. Synaptic is a great frontend with an easy to use GUI.

I recommend using Ubuntu as your first distribution. It is easy to use and there are plenty of people to help you out while using it. Linux is difficult to learn and it'll take some time, but it's all worth it in the end.

Hope this helps,
Russ
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Post 3+ Months Ago

synaptic is a great GUI for package management. & luckily they have apt/syanptic for most of the major rpm based distro's.

i wouldn't recommend ubuntu if you have a video card made by ATI. at least not anything newer than the 9700.. me & my friends have had an abundance of problems in this area.
if i was going to make a recommendation on what to use it would probably be openSuSE 10.2
:shrug:

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