Extended Linux Partitions

  • benoitb
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Does the 'extended partition' configuration allow for stretching single directories across several disks?

If this is not the case, is it possible? Through RAID only?
  • Axe
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Please do not cross-post. When people view unread threads, they will see it in here just as well as they can in the other forums.
  • b_heyer
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I don't know if that is necissarily possible, but you could have /home/usr1/ on one harddrive and /home on another. You'd probably have a good chance of googling this.
  • benoitb
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I could not find much information with a standard google search.
  • Vladdrac
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If I am not mistaken, isn't extending a partition mean that if you have some extra unpartitioned space, it will extend into it if it needs it?

Or maybe not unpartitioned, but a special kind of partition.
  • rjmthezonenet
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Post 3+ Months Ago

In this usage, extending is synonymous to enlarging. Since the additional space allocated to a partion may--or may not--exist on the same disk, it is pointless to make reference to multiple disks in the definition. Simply put, extending a partion means to make the partion larger.

Vladdrac, you're referring to features which enable a system to dynamically extend a partion depending on system usage. It is still extending a partion... just a hands-free variation.

Note: Not all partions can (officially) be extended and/or may not support disk spanning.
  • benoitb
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Post 3+ Months Ago

So I could do this with a scsi raid array acting as one drive? I have 2, 3 drive RAID arrays of 18.4GB 15krpm SCSI drives. I simply want to use both arrays as a single home partition of 72GB. Any feedback on how is this possible?
  • rjmthezonenet
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Keep in mind that extending a partition across two disks doubles the possibility of a hardware failure destroying your data. (Not the same as RAID)

RAID is Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks. The technology, among other things, combines multiple disks and presents them as a single storage unit to your operating system. If your 3 drives are part of a RAID, your partitions are automatically spread across the disks.

I'm guessing you aren't using RAID, you have three disks, one is in use, and the other two disks are free. If so, you can create a 36GB partition as long as your partition type and operating system support it. In Linux, try using Disk Druid to create a software RAID 0 volume that spans disk 2 and 3.

Also, check the documentation for your SCSI RAID. If it supports Linear RAID, you can logically join the two disks and present them as a single unit to your system.
  • benoitb
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The two 'disks' are virtual arrays of 3 drives performing as 2 - so I am not terribly conserned the probability of a drive failure on that scale. I will look into your suggestions, thanks for your help.

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