fedora intalation

  • killing_killer
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hi. i am new to linux and i'd like to install fedora. Can someone show me some guides to install fedora or where could i dowl fedora from. I have downloaded a linux fedora.iso over 3 GB and i can't open with daemon. Shouldn't it have an autoplay or something like that so that it would start by itself. I know that linux is very very diferent from windows so if you could show me some guides in how to use it i'd be greatful :)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You're way off track. You don't open an ISO. You burn it to a CD and you boot the machine with it. Then you do the install. However, don't do it if you plan to dual boot unless you partition your drive first. Otherwise, your Windows will be gone. It's better do have a separate machine for it. I bought a Lenovo laptop, removed Vista and installed FreeBSD. Then I connect to it using ssh from other machines on the network.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

you dont open *linux iso's, >.< at least there isn't much use in simply opening them. if you have a program which provides a virtual machine such as microsoft virtual pc or vmware workstation, you can open and run the iso and run linux in windows. however, there are many advantages to burning the iso, partitioning the hard drive, and installing the distro directly to the drive. if you'd like to go this route, you can use norton partition magic or acronis disk director while you're in windows. the disadvantage is those aren't free. gparted is a free partition manager and they provide a livecd, where you burn the iso like any other distro but it doesn't install, it just runs from the cd. in order to partition your drive, you should have a good chunk of free space. i'd suggest at least 10-15GB for linux, and be sure you still have some free space in XP as they gripe when you're running low on disk space >.<

as for using fedora, there's plenty of guides such as http://www.fedorafaq.org/ :]
  • kc0tma
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Like they said, the iso gets burned to the disk, but one thing I learned the hard way is to NOT choose the "make a bootable disk" option with my nero back when I had windows. The best way to properly burn the iso to disk is to right click it, choose "open with..." then pick whatever your disk burning software is.

I run fedora 8 on my desktop pc and so far it is my favorite linux that I've played with. The anaconda installer works really well, and doing it all graffically is a breeze. Be sure to take your time learning to use linux so you don't get too frustrated, and become very well acquainted with the fedora forums and wiki and whitepapers and stuff. Get real comfortable with the command line and using vi or nano (text editors), maybe learn to write shell scripts, and it is always a good and fun idea to install different server stuff like apache and mysql and vsftd, to name a few. And I always recommend a good thick book, it should be easy to find one. The nice thing about fedora is that it is pretty much essentially Red Hat linux, so if you can get a red hat book it will be a perfect reference.
  • gamekiller
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Post 3+ Months Ago

when it come to partitioning, I always make two partition, one for boot, and the others for swap,

I guess, no need to make partition for /boot,
it'll cause your pc or notebook fail to read a windows disk, if u are trying to format or repairing your windows(If u intend to dual booting).

SORRY, i just edit this post, here's the correct post.

when it come to partitioning, I always make two partition, ONE FOR /, and the others for swap..

SORRY,my bad :cry:
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

eh.. if you're creating multiple partitions for linux, i prefer a partition for / and another partition for /home, that way when you install a newer version of the distro you dont lose your user data.
  • kc0tma
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the swap partition kind of required no matter what?
  • Don2007
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Post 3+ Months Ago

No, one time I was having a problem with an install and I put the entire thing under /

The ideal scenario is to have:
/
/usr
/tmp
/var
/dev
/swap

Has anyone noticed that the original poster has not returned?
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

yup. o well
but i forget about the swap partition because i already have that made so when i install a new os, theres no need to create it >.<
  • gamekiller
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Post 3+ Months Ago

AnarchY SI wrote:
eh.. if you're creating multiple partitions for linux, i prefer a partition for / and another partition for /home, that way when you install a newer version of the distro you dont lose your user data.

i quite dont get it,
what do you mean 'dont lose your data'? is it when i install a new version the /home is still there?
  • kc0tma
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Like your internet favorites and music and documents and stuff will go in /home/yourName, and the rest of the operating system stuff goes in / and other directories. So when you install a new distro, just don't touch the /home when you do your partitioning and all your documents will still be there.

EDIT: And, if you have more than one hard drive, putting / on one drive and /home on the other can be a performance enhancement too. Both hard drives will be spinning at once, making things load up a wee bit faster.
  • gamekiller
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Post 3+ Months Ago

how do i install the new distro without touching the /home? Normally if i install any distro, by default it will create a /home right? so, how to avoid touching that partition?
  • kc0tma
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You'll have to choose whatever option says something like manually partition or custom partitioning or something, I can't remember what it says in fedora. But just don't do anything to the /home and recreate the / directory.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

you have to choose a custom partitioning setup which it will tell you is for experts only. but then you create a partition for / , tell it to format the partition and i usually create all my partitions as ext3. then you create another partition and mount it as /home. you'll need another 1gb or 2gb partition as swap. if you're installing a distro for the first time, you'd tell it to format /home (because you dont have any data already), if you're installing a new version of another distro, you'd tell it not to format /home (usually its a checkbox or a menu option)

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