Voting Chart

Total votes : 3

Which one would you do?

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    Stay with Windows for the time being
  •  
    Keep trying with SUSE
  •  
    Just go for learning Fedora Core
  •  
    Ubuntu
  •  
    Gentoo

help, I don't know what to do about windows and SUSE!

  • Moonfire
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I installed SUSE a while back and had a bit of problems installing everything, but because I was having more hassels with it, I decided to just go back to XP. Now I have a blue star saying that I have validation failure details for my XP and I want to start using SUSE again (and hopefully be able to use it properly). My question is although it is partitioned, can I competely remove XP without giving myself too much stress?

I thought I would add a poll, I thought it might be easier :)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • this213
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You can completely remove XP if you don't want to use it anymore.

If you're looking for a replacement for a desktop system, I would suggest Fedora Core or Ubuntu though, as these are specifically geared toward that.

Of course, IMO SuSe isn't good for much in any area anyway - but we each have our opinions.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

well I have got all the books and everything for SUSE, I really dont want to be chopping ang changing my os

Quote:
Of course, IMO SuSe isn't good for much in any area anyway - but we each have our opinions.


so why is that then? I'm looking for something that I can use within the industry (hoping to work with computers) and I thought SUSE was the way to go - did I make an error in judgment or is it just a personal preference on your part?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Every Linux distribution has it's ups and downs. Debian, Gentoo and Slackware are al great for servers but hard on the end user. Ubuntu, Fedora Core and CentOS (which is RHEL without the $) are really good for the desktop. Some other distributions are perfect for firewalls, security analysers, mail servers and so forth. Suse doesn't rise to the top in any of these fields.

Since you're talking about a replacement for Windows XP, either Fedora Core or Ubuntu rise to the top - in that order. This is because they provide support for more hardware, they have easy to use package management systems, they have huge communities - which means more repos - which means more software can be installed (after configuring those repos) with "yum install what_i_want" - or through point and click yum extender or whatever-that-thing-is-Ubuntu-uses (I don't use Ubuntu myself - never have, probably never will). Since these are geared toward the desktop, they also include new and upgraded packages faster than other distribtutions.

Fedora Core is a logical choice for another reason in your case though: It's the forerunner to RedHat Enterprise Linux. RedHat puts features out to Fedora Core to work them out before including them into RHEL. This means that if you get comfortable working with FC, you'll be able to find yourself around RHEL with no problems - RHEL is the prominent Linux server on corporate networks these days.

I'm not going to say you made an error in judgement - that would just be rude. But I would advise you to at least take a look at Fedora Core and, if you don't like that, give Ubuntu a shot. I think you'll find that either of these will serve you better than Suse on a desktop. I don't really have anything against Suse, mind you - it's just that there are better tools for the job in every application I can think of - in my opinion.

Of course, there's nothing saying that you must use such and such a distribution: you're free to use whatever you want. If you like Suse and you're comfortable with it, there's nothing saying you have to switch distributions.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

<-- noob here, so what is RHEL? Its probably really simple, but I/m just not seeing it :)

thank you for your input - I will certainly look at Fedora Core, whether I will abandon SUSE just yet, now that is a different matter - I hate having to spend money and not get the most of the thing that I have bought :)

and I think that I wont uninstall Windows just yet, I think I need to learn a whole lot more :)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

RHEL = RedHat Enterprise Linux

Yeah, I know the whole deal for getting the most out of something you pay for.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

At Big Blue, we lean more towards SLES, rather than RHEL. The APAR cycle is better suited for large business -- and I might add, more in depth.
When we first investigated the differences, we noted that the kernel was several revisions behind, thus barring us from quite a few avenues we wished to traverse.

In the end, we lean towards SLES, but that's not to say RHEL doesn't have a presence. ;)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

We still think SuSe sucks ;-p

Seriously, I've been seeing more of it over the past 4 months or so (still not saying it's better). I'm already biased though as just about everything I touch is one of CentOS, RHEL, Fedora Core or Gentoo (about in that order).

I'll give you the lag on kernel updates though - and the lag on just about any other updates for RHEL. It sure will be nice when they get around to updating Gnome to something written in this century, sigh. You know me and the GUI :)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ya know, itd be really nice if the installer for suse went faster. an hour compared to 20 minutes for FC5 is just crazy. i do find suse to be a little bit more aesthetically pleasing but i'm typing this from FC5 so that makes it a little more obvious which distro i prefer ;]
i didn't like the problems i ran into with dependancies when i installed suse. :shakes head: drove me crazy...




and what is big blue? lol
  • Enjoi_Panda_Man
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Post 3+ Months Ago

i had a terrible time trying to install suse going the network install path. i didnt want to download all the iso's and burn them cause it was just too many seeing as that i wasnt going to use about 90% of packages on there and what not. rather than have a list of known mirrors to download from i had to input an ip or url. every single one i tried would not work for some reason. it was just utterly absurd that i could install gentoo but i couldnt do a simple network install of suse. ever since then i havent liked it much. ive even used it on my friends laptop and i wasnt impressed. i use debian cause im just addicted to apt and debians package managment system. this is why i recommend ubuntu to moonfire since its based off debian.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

they have apt for fedora :-P
i wouldn't really bother with it, but its there.. lol


if i wasn't impatient and gentoo didn't HATE my computer, i'd try installing it again...but theres just no point. lol kororra isn't a bad choice for that tho...and they have xgl for kororra and xgl is hott so i may go that route. but i'm going to have to get bored with fedora first, lol again
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Post 3+ Months Ago

this213 wrote:
We still think SuSe sucks ;-p

Seriously, I've been seeing more of it over the past 4 months or so (still not saying it's better). I'm already biased though as just about everything I touch is one of CentOS, RHEL, Fedora Core or Gentoo (about in that order).

I'll give you the lag on kernel updates though - and the lag on just about any other updates for RHEL. It sure will be nice when they get around to updating Gnome to something written in this century, sigh. You know me and the GUI :)


I will say this, the Enterprise level is a far cry better than the freebie. The development model closely resembles that of my fav, FreeBSD. That's one reason we chose SLES over RHEL. That and the lag in dev cycles. Then again, I have no idea what level Gnome is on SLES -- we never boot to the gui. :) Heh.

You and your darn GUI's. :)

Anarchy, 'Big Blue' is IBM.
  • Enjoi_Panda_Man
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Post 3+ Months Ago

i still havent gotten around to installing kororra and having it run natively. live cd wouldnt boot on my pc for some reason. it would get through everything and when it came to startx it would just freeze. and quite frankly im not in the mood nor do i have the patience for installing gentoo right now.

come on daemonguy you know GUI's are good everyonce in awhile. i know i get tired of starring at black and white.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Enjoi_Panda_Man wrote:
i still havent gotten around to installing kororra and having it run natively. live cd wouldnt boot on my pc for some reason. it would get through everything and when it came to startx it would just freeze. and quite frankly im not in the mood nor do i have the patience for installing gentoo right now.



you could try installing the version of kororra w/the installer and then go through the how to on getting xgl running ;)

aww, come on..we all need to get a little gui once in a while ;]

weird....IBM is still around? :P
lol jk
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Nope, GUI's suck. :)
  • this213
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Daemonguy wrote:
Nope, GUI's suck. :)

How else can you stack 20 terminal windows? I don't have that many functions keys! ;)

Strictly speaking though, none of the machines here boot to a GUI either - everything boots to runlevel 3 (or equivalent). The servers here don't even have X installed.

I stuck in a vote for Fedora Core. I think that you'll have very little problems getting your work done with this and you'll still have easy access to a powerful distribution.

If you aim isn't exactly to get work done, but rather to learn Linux inside and out, I would suggest you install Slackware and then build an LFS system from it. If you do this, expect some time in a terminal. Once you've completed though, you'll know more than most people out there on the internals of Linux. You can build an LFS system with Fedora too, it's just that Fedora builds your system up for you so you miss all that learning experience at the outset.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
I would suggest you install Slackware and then build an LFS system from it.


look I have just worked out that rpm has nothing to do with CD's so throwing words like slackware and LFS systems just confounds me ;)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

LOL, sorry. Slackware is another distribution, one in which the term "user-friendly" has no meaning.

LFS is Linux From Scratch ( http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/ ). This is a distribution that you build based off of your currently running distribution, whether it be Slackware, Gentoo, Fedora Core or SuSe.

Neither of these is for the beginner unless your sole aim to running Linux is to learn how it works. However, given the direction of this topic, I thought you should be made aware of these - if only for future reference.
  • Moonfire
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Thanks for that this213, I will bear that in mind and I will certainly bookmark the link :D
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Daemonguy wrote:
Nope, GUI's suck. :)



hahah...way to be open minded in our open source world :P
  • Enjoi_Panda_Man
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Post 3+ Months Ago

GUI's do have its advantages.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Enjoi_Panda_Man wrote:
GUI's do have its advantages.


*their, advantages? GUI's is plural and its is singular ;]
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Post 3+ Months Ago

this213 wrote:

How else can you stack 20 terminal windows? I don't have that many functions keys! ;)


One word; screen. :)
http://www.gnu.org/software/screen/
this213 wrote:

Strictly speaking though, none of the machines here boot to a GUI either - everything boots to runlevel 3 (or equivalent). The servers here don't even have X installed.

Excellent. That darn X is just inviting trouble on a server.

I have to admit, on a desktop *nix machine (or one of my *nix laptops) I do run X -- but I NEVER run it on a server. :)


AnarchY SI wrote:

hahah...way to be open minded in our open source world


I fail to see how not wanting a function, which is at best useless or at worst, a known pathway to vulnerability places me in the close-minded category where open source is concerned. :) The underlying OS remains open source, as do the vast majority of packages, ports and toolsets.
In fact, I would say I am MORE open minded towards open source -- not because I have written some (which I have), or because it's a corporate direction (which it is), but because the derived benefit of OS is the innate ability to take what you need and remove what you do not. ;)

Cheers.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Daemonguy wrote:
I fail to see how not wanting a function, which is at best useless or at worst, a known pathway to vulnerability places me in the close-minded category where open source is concerned. :) The underlying OS remains open source, as do the vast majority of packages, ports and toolsets.
In fact, I would say I am MORE open minded towards open source -- not because I have written some (which I have), or because it's a corporate direction (which it is), but because the derived benefit of OS is the innate ability to take what you need and remove what you do not. ;)

Cheers.



i was jk :P lol
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Daemonguy wrote:
AnarchY SI wrote:

hahah...way to be open minded in our open source world


I fail to see how not wanting a function, which is at best useless or at worst, a known pathway to vulnerability places me in the close-minded category where open source is concerned. :) The underlying OS remains open source, as do the vast majority of packages, ports and toolsets.
In fact, I would say I am MORE open minded towards open source -- not because I have written some (which I have), or because it's a corporate direction (which it is), but because the derived benefit of OS is the innate ability to take what you need and remove what you do not. ;)

Cheers.

Well said, but you forgot the part about how you can modify an open source system to do only that which it's designed to do.

Yes, I know about screen, I was just poking.

X doesn't belong on servers, period. Anyone who thinks it's a good idea to just install whatever they can get their hands on to a server should be forced to listen to Ben Stein read man pages for 6 months. When he runs out of those, have him switch to RFC's. One of the reasons why Linux servers are more stable than Windows "I'm trying to be like" servers is that everything isn't tied into the GUI. Another reason is that there isn't (ideally) any worthless crap on a server - the only components there are what it needs to do its job (which is often single-minded).
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Post 3+ Months Ago

this213 wrote:

Well said, but you forgot the part about how you can modify an open source system to do only that which it's designed to do.


True, though that's how I meant it. :)

this213 wrote:
Yes, I know about screen, I was just poking.

I figured you would, but perhaps others might not be. ;)


this213 wrote:
X doesn't belong on servers, period. Anyone who thinks it's a good idea to just install whatever they can get their hands on to a server should be forced to listen to Ben Stein read man pages for 6 months. When he runs out of those, have him switch to RFC's. One of the reasons why Linux servers are more stable than Windows "I'm trying to be like" servers is that everything isn't tied into the GUI. Another reason is that there isn't (ideally) any worthless crap on a server - the only components there are what it needs to do its job (which is often single-minded).


Well said. I wish more sysads had that much common sense. Sigh.

Ben Stein... heh. <Ben_Stein>Man formats and displays the on-line manual pages. This version knows
about the MANPATH and PAGER environment variables, so you can have your
own set(s) of personal man pages and choose whatever program you like to
display the formatted pages. If section is specified, man only looks in
that section of the manual. You may also specify the order to search the
sections for entries and which preprocessors to run on the source files
via command line options or environment variables. If enabled by the
system administrator, formatted man pages will also be compressed with
the `/usr/bin/gzip -c' command to save space.

Bueller? Bueller? </Ben_Stein>

Now that's funny.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

wouldnt that be considered cruel and unusual punishment?
  • Daemonguy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Indeed.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

That's the idea. You know after an experience like that you'd hear that droning voice every time you even looked at a computer.

Still, it beats giving your sysadmins a shock collar that goes off every time the server their working on detects a layer 8 error.

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