Install Linux on Thinkpad?

  • wonderland
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Well, i've got a new thinkpad R60e (T1400solo, RAM upgraded to 1GB, combo drive, GMA950 graphics, 60GB hdd, 1000Mbps LAN, plus a wi-fi to be added on soon)

now, it's has an XP home edition preinstalled (that is to say, without an sys recovery media), and due to some personal interest, i'd like to install a Linux sys on it (without destroying other existing contents),
1) how can i do this,
and 2) which linux should i choose?

any suggestions are welcomed.

PS:
1) i have never used linux before.
2) i don't think i'll use VMware or something like that for it's not so efficient.

3) i use linux mainly for studying software engineering.
Thanks~~
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • spork
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Most distributions can install on a separate partition and come with a bootloader that will let you boot into either Windows or Linux. Ubuntu is popular distribution at the moment, although I use and prefer Fedora. Both are very easy to install.

wonderland wrote:
now, it's has an XP home edition preinstalled (that is to say, without an sys recovery media),

This seems kind of strange. Manufacturers are required to give you a copy of Windows and/or a recovery CD, otherwise it's not exactly legal.. I'm pretty sure you should have one for a new Thinkpad. Look around in the stuff that came with it.
  • wonderland
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Post 3+ Months Ago

spork wrote:
This seems kind of strange. Manufacturers are required to give you a copy of Windows and/or a recovery CD, otherwise it's not exactly legal.. I'm pretty sure you should have one for a new Thinkpad. Look around in the stuff that came with it.


actrually, it do seem strange... i've been contacting with lenovo about this issue.....

could anyone tell me the main difference between Ubuntu and Fedora?
and which have better support on muti-language?
thank again..
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

it may be that within windows, they have software preinstalled which will allow you to create your own recovery media. another option, which is the most popular one, is that theres a separate partition which has all of the recovery information on it. usually this partition is around 8-9GB, but normally it's only about half full.

what you need to do is acquire some disk partitioning software so that you may resize your windows xp partition to give some free space to install linux. if you dont want to have the possibility of losing your data by resizing your partition (because it is possible), then both ubuntu and fedora have livecds where you can boot from the cd and use the operating system without having to install it.
my partitioning software of choice is acronis disk director suite, however if you wanted a free utility gparted has a livecd which you can download and freely use to repartition your hard drive.
the main difference between ubuntu and fedora is the format software comes in. ubuntu is based on debian and uses .deb packages, and fedora is (or at least was originally) sponsored by redhat and uses .rpm packages. the way these work is different, but nothing that needs to be mastered immediately :] if you'd like more information on the differences, try google

as a suggestion, i'd tell you to try them both. download the livecds and use each of them to see what you like best. i would definitely test which is most compatible with your hardware, and once you get the wireless card check to make sure each of them works with it (i wouldn't install linux before installing the wireless card for convenience purposes). if you'd like to try more distro's, you could go to http://www.distrowatch.com and search for distro's that have livecds if you wanted to continue down that path. otherwise, distrowatch has information about different distributions and links to most, if not all, of the distro's websites.
  • spork
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Post 3+ Months Ago

wonderland wrote:
could anyone tell me the main difference between Ubuntu and Fedora?
and which have better support on muti-language?
thank again..

Both have excellent multi-language support.

Ubuntu is aimed primarily at users who don't want/need to learn a whole lot about Linux itself, and just want an alternative OS to Windows or OS X.

One thing I really don't like about Ubuntu is the fact that it disables the root account by default. This complicates things for any user who's going to do any serious system administration.

I use and prefer Fedora for a few main reasons: 1) It's incredible easy to install/update software via yum; 2) It incorporates a lot of new and emerging technologies that many other distributions do not; 3) I just like it better. :D

My advice would be to try both and decide for yourself.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

yea, the whole 'no root' thing kinda threw me off, but i did a lot through the terminal so i just changed the root password instead of always using sudo & would use su, lol
and personally, i prefer the apt package management which is thankfully available in fedora >.< one thing that i was surprised about / didn't like was that fedora didn't work with my wifi card (wmp54g) but after turning off roaming in ubuntu it worked without a hitch.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You need to create a distinct partition using a tool such as Partition Magic. Make a portion of the disk space set this way, then install your variety of *nix.

Windows doesn't like to play nice, so you need ot have that laid down first -- not a problem here since it pre-exists the change.

Your chosen variety should have a boot manager which should offer itself for install (my FreeBSD installs usually contain the step 'Install Boot Manager').

Once that is installed, your first screen after POST will inquire as to which partition you wish to run, Windows or *nix.
  • wonderland
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Well, thank you everyone and i'll try their livecds first~
and, dont worry about partition, i've done it already,
now my partition is like this
c: sys of winxp, 10GB (NTFS)
d: my workspace, 10GB (NTFS)
e: spaces left for file exchanging between linux and winXP, 10GB(FAT32)
*: unallocated space for linux,10GB(unformatted)
f: backup and pagefiles, and some temp folders(11.xGB)
*: preloaded system recovery partition(just like AnarchY SI said),4.xGB(FAT32??)

but just one more question: can i use NTFS under linux?
it's generally thought to be not possible to do that, right?

Appreciate flies to everyone~~

PS: Acronis Disk Director Suite is a quite handy tool, despite its ... price(at least for me).
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

hey, are you wondering if you can install linux to an ntfs partition, or if you can access files from one? because file access is easily doable and most distro's now support it, but its not even a little possible to install linux to an ntfs partition
  • wonderland
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Post 3+ Months Ago

of coz i'm not to INSTALL linux into a NTFS partition,

i'm just wondering about the means of access....
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

ahh, i dont think i read your post with a clear mind when i asked that question.
as of the 2.6.20 version of the kernel, NTFS support is built in. so its become standard in most distro's to auto-mount your NTFS partitions and if you want to write to them you can set it up to do that.
  • wonderland
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Post 3+ Months Ago

sorry for the silence for a long period....
i'm on vacation anyway....

so that's all clear. i'm to install it as soon as i got them....

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