installed Fedora7 on my ThinkPad R60e, then got stuck.

  • wonderland
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Post 3+ Months Ago

i successfully installed Fedora7 on my ThinkPad....
then i found that all my partition disappeared in "computer"...
but under WindowsXP, they're normal....
how can i get them back in Fedora?

BTW, how can i set (change) the default boot sys in gnome?
i'd like use windows more currently...

thanks...

some more question...
is there any way to disable the root psw check every time i change network configuration, display or so?
i'm using a WI-FI card using Atheros chipset, but it can't be recognized properly, do i have a way to solve this too?

thank again.
  • Anonymous
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • KunstSammler
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Well, as far as your partition is concerned i'm pretty sure a NTFS file system won't show up under linux.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

actually linux has advanced to the point of being able to read and write to NTFS partitions :] it just sounds like yours aren't being mounted when the system boots up. the ntfs-3g drivers should is supposed to be prebuilt into fedora 7, so open up a terminal and execute the following commands:
Code: [ Select ]
su -
(enter your root user password)
fdisk -l
  1. su -
  2. (enter your root user password)
  3. fdisk -l

this should output information about all of the storage devices you have connected to your computer. the information should look similar to this..
Quote:
root@shibbyu:~# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 300.0 GB, 300069052416 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 36481 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 1 20887 167774796 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda2 20888 29386 68268217+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3 29387 31429 16410397+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sda4 31430 36481 40580190 83 Linux

of course, it wont be exactly the same because thats one of my sata drives :]
once you have this output you may mount your ntfs partition somewhere in fedora. i create a folder in the root of my drive called windows, referenced: /windows
to do this, still in the same terminal prompt you'd execute: mkdir /windows
as you can see i have 2 NTFS partitions, 1 FAT32 partition, and 1 ext3 partition on this drive. so inside of the windows folder, i make 3 more directories:
Code: [ Select ]
mkdir /windows/C
mkdir /windows/D
mkdir /windows/E
  1. mkdir /windows/C
  2. mkdir /windows/D
  3. mkdir /windows/E

now, i can mount my NTFS and FAT32 partitions into these locations with this command:
Code: [ Select ]
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /windows/C
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda2 /windows/D
mount -t vfat /dev/sda3 /windows/E
  1. mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /windows/C
  2. mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda2 /windows/D
  3. mount -t vfat /dev/sda3 /windows/E

now, when i browse to /windows/C i see all of the windows documents i have on my C drive, and so on for the other two. for the mount command, the -t flag is for what type of partition you're trying to mount. ntfs-3g is for ntfs partitions, vfat is for fat partitions, if i wanted to mount an ext3 partition you'd simply replace ntfs-3g or vfat with ext3. the /dev/sda1 is what you get from the fdisk command we executed earlier. all of these commands should be executed with root privileges. if you dont want to have to mount the partitions manually each time you start fedora, you'd edit the /etc/fstab file (which requires root privileges) and you'd append these lines to the END of that file. dont replace anything. once you've added these lines to the file, the next time you start fedora the partitions should mount automatically and you'll have your data available in the directories you created.

check out this thread to see how to make windows your default boot option.

check out this thread for help with getting your wifi working (looks like you need to install madwifi and this shows you how)

it's highly recommended that you don't disable the root password as that strips the heck out of the security of linux. if you're doing a lot of configuration, you could login as the root user, modify what you need, and then login as your regular user. running things through the terminal after su'ing works great too.


hope this helps :]
  • Janrocks
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Post 3+ Months Ago

To change your boot order you need to alter the /boot/grub/menu.list file. (fedora users please correct if not there) I will assume you know the basics of running as root and using nano/gedit/whatever editor


There are loads of options you can change, but only a couple that you’re likely to be interested in. The default boot entry is defined by the “default” value.

The default value is 0, which means that the first entry in the list (which is linux) always gets loaded.

If you want to make it so that Windows XP loads by default, change the value to n, as XP is the nnn item in the list (the numbering system starts at 0).

The other way to load Windows XP by default is to change the value for “default” from a numerical value to “saved”. Then, GRUB will load whichever boot entry has been marked with “savedefault”.

If you scroll down the list and have a look at the entries, you’ll notice that both the main linux entry and Windows XP have been marked with “savedefault”. Remove the value for linux and Windows XP will launch by default.

You can also increase the boot menu timeout – just change the value for “timeout”. You can also hide the GRUB boot menu by removing the hash in front of “hiddenmenu”. Save and exit the editor to keep any changes.

That's as far as I go because I don't use windows at all.

::edit:: beat me to it Anarchy :-)
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

hahah yea.. it happens ^_^

& to my knowledge, the grub info to modify is in /boot/grub/grub.conf in fedora :]
  • spork
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Fedora comes with a GUI utility for managing your GRUB boot configuration. Look for it under Utilities or something similar. Can't remember the exact location.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

system-config-boot

can be run through the run prompt (alt+f2) or via command line.
  • KunstSammler
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Post 3+ Months Ago

AnarchY SI wrote:
actually linux has advanced to the point of being able to read and write to NTFS partitions


Sorry bout that, had no idea.
Awesome news though!
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

no need to be sorry :]
and yes, i agree.

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