PC Linux Development

  • Tdotwire
  • Proficient
  • Proficient
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 486
  • Loc: Toronto

Post 3+ Months Ago

I am planning to install Linux onto one of my computers in attempt to understand how it works, and eventually get an idea of how to understand linux servers.

So what would be the best version of linux to install on a home pc for a begginer?
  • kiran.mehta
  • Newbie
  • Newbie
  • kiran.mehta
  • Posts: 9
  • Loc: India

Post 3+ Months Ago

you can install RedHat Linux 8.o version. This i found easy to learn version :)
  • lemiwinks1
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 244
  • Loc: out of my mind:its dark and scary in there

Post 3+ Months Ago

mandriva 2005 Limited Edition

i have a reason to suggest the single most primo mandriva(mandrake) and that is because it has far more and better drivers. and if you cant find drivers for your hardware you will hate your linux experience.

use this link
http://www.softpedia.com/progDownload/Mandriva-Linux-Download-21694.html
  • AnarchY SI
  • Web Master
  • Web Master
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 2521
  • Loc: /usr/src/MI

Post 3+ Months Ago

or Xandros. its pretty stupid simple :) to install and to use. the installation is 5 clicks of your mouse.. consisting of "ok" and "next" hahah
http://www.xandros.com

however mandriva would be another good choice...you COULD install both :-D mm..the thing i liked best about xandros was the bootloader, hahah..it was just good looking.
  • desertland
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • desertland
  • Posts: 206

Post 3+ Months Ago

You could always use a Live Linux CD (such as knoppix) to get linux running without installing anything. It's a "quick and easy" way to get introduced to Linux - all you do is burn the file to the CD, and then boot from it!
  • AnarchY SI
  • Web Master
  • Web Master
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 2521
  • Loc: /usr/src/MI

Post 3+ Months Ago

but with a live cd, one will not become accustomed to the installation process of a linux distro ;) and if you want to save things...you could have problems. lol
  • lemiwinks1
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 244
  • Loc: out of my mind:its dark and scary in there

Post 3+ Months Ago

the other NICE distro is SuSE if you have a friend who has it and will burn/loan it to you
  • AnarchY SI
  • Web Master
  • Web Master
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 2521
  • Loc: /usr/src/MI

Post 3+ Months Ago

but you definitely need a friend.. its 5 cd's or 1 dvd ;)
unless your going to take a while to download it..
  • tomrulez
  • Expert
  • Expert
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 571
  • Loc: England!!

Post 3+ Months Ago

Yer mandriva would be good.
  • Tdotwire
  • Proficient
  • Proficient
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 486
  • Loc: Toronto

Post 3+ Months Ago

mandriva is good :P


One question thou, for those who develop on a server which uses a win32 operating system ( win server 2000, win server 2003, win nt) you have the luxury of being able to login onto your server and use it like a pc using remote desktop.

However in accordance to linux based servers, is it possible to do the same thing? only using a program meant for linux?
  • this213
  • Guru
  • Guru
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 1260
  • Loc: ./

Post 3+ Months Ago

I'm somewhat surprised nobody mentioned Fedora Core 4.

If you really want to understand how Linux works get Slackware, Debian or Gentoo. You'll be forced to learn something. If you want something that's user friendly - well, everyone has a different opinion of that.

You can SSH into a linux server and use it as if you were local. PuTTy and WinSCP are decent windows clients for SSH.
  • Tom the Great
  • Expert
  • Expert
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 727
  • Loc: B.C., Canada

Post 3+ Months Ago

slackware was really good for jumping right in, since I found a few problems, I learned how to search for answers, and a lot more about the OS than if I just installed it with a few clicks. Debian, was kinda in the middle, but there was an issue I had with my harddrives and I had to pass a command to install it, and now I can't remember the command, so I am going to try out fedora core 4 next. For me I just want a linux desktop OS with some server functionality, not much more, but if you want more in depth linux stuff, try out slackware, debian, etc.
  • pclovers
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 155
  • Loc: Nagpur, India

Post 3+ Months Ago

use fedora good distribution
  • Enjoi_Panda_Man
  • Graduate
  • Graduate
  • Enjoi_Panda_Man
  • Posts: 166
  • Loc: TX

Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
If you really want to understand how Linux works get Slackware, Debian or Gentoo.


gentoo is a terrible idea for a beginner. if he has zero understanding of linux i really dont see how he could make it past the installation. and in my opinion i really never liked mandriva. then again after i moved away from it i never went back to it now that im more expirienced. i say try ubuntu. havent thoroughly used it myself but its based off debian and it seems to be quite user friendly. i think you would get a lot out of that with few problems.
  • Tdotwire
  • Proficient
  • Proficient
  • User avatar
  • Posts: 486
  • Loc: Toronto

Post 3+ Months Ago

so far the best one I have run is fedora 4
  • WNxGratefulJed
  • Beginner
  • Beginner
  • WNxGratefulJed
  • Posts: 52
  • Loc: Trailerparkansas

Post 3+ Months Ago

I have wondered the same as you and what I have decided to do was to make a fun project out of it by setting up my own home webserver. Go get Fedora Core 2 and get this book http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/078214 ... s&v=glance . Its a pretty good tutorial on how to set up a webserver using the LAMP technique which is short for (L)inux, (A)pache, (M)ySQL, (P)HP.

The book recommends getting Fedora Core 2 and all the examples are built for Fedora Core 2. I used Fedora Core 4 and have not had too many problems.

This should be a great start on learning Linux and if you run into any trouble you can come back here to ozzu.com for a quick correct answer (you guys are awesome :))

The book ends after you get your first PHP page going with is just the php info(). I realize that you just wanted to find out about how a linux server works but If you find yourself wanting to create webpages using PHP after you finish the first book then I would suggest getting this book by the same author http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/078214 ... s&v=glance

Im having a blast learning more and more about linux and how much fun it is.

Post Information

  • Total Posts in this topic: 16 posts
  • Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 57 guests
  • You cannot post new topics in this forum
  • You cannot reply to topics in this forum
  • You cannot edit your posts in this forum
  • You cannot delete your posts in this forum
  • You cannot post attachments in this forum
 
 

© 1998-2014. Ozzu® is a registered trademark of Unmelted, LLC.