Linux

  • geev
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  • geev
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  • Loc: Tanzania

Post 3+ Months Ago

Hallow there hi,
I need your to help me. I want to lean how to use linux in general so as a beginer which varsion will better for me
  • Anonymous
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • etechsupport
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Post 3+ Months Ago

If you are jumping from windows or other operating systems to linux the best ways to visit google and search linux tutorial. Linux tutorial is a self explanatory and easy to learn linux basic.
  • geev
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  • geev
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  • Loc: Tanzania

Post 3+ Months Ago

thanks mr novice
  • desertland
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  • desertland
  • Posts: 206

Post 3+ Months Ago

I'd recommend Debian for someone just getting started with Linux... you can try it here:

http://www.debian.org/

Redhat is also pretty good (redhat.com)
  • Mas Sehguh
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Generally speaking, I think you should pick a version that you can install.

Once you install it, you'll have a desktop with nice programs that you can use, and it's easy. So then you might be interested in the organization of the filesystem, and some basic terminal commands. (There's nothing interesting about using Linux software, especially considering that FireFox, jEdit, Emacs, Vi, Opera, and OpenOffice all pretty much have the same interface as their Windows counterparts. The software is generally user friendly, at least until it stops working.)

There's not really much to learn, and it seems simple once you've done it. I guess I don't understand the idea of "learning an operating system," because there's no way you could ever understand the ins and outs of all the parts and applications of the entire operating system. (Not even if you're Linus Torvalds.)

So I guess there are four basic parts to "Learning Linux":
1. Understanding the structure of the file system. (My knowledge goes no further than that I know there exists a "home" directory, which I don't leave unless I'm on vacation.)
2. Understanding how file permissions work.
3. Knowing some command line commands, and being able to figure out how to install software that's distributed as source code.
4. Being familiar with the software on your computer.

Part 1 I don't really care about; I just avoid touching my file system.
Part 2 is necessary to understand.
Part 3 is sort of necessary, and as far as installing software goes, that doesn't usually require more than looking at a README file and following directions.
Part 4 is of course necessary; random button pushing never solved anything.
  • pclovers
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  • Loc: Nagpur, India

Post 3+ Months Ago

Most, latest linux version are come to the uniformity and easy grapical user interface.

It, depend on you.
If u want to use debian based linux as a newbie use "Suse linux."
For rpm based linux use "Fedora" or "Redhat".

I recommend you to go for fedora or redhat. I have used them and still using them.
Suse personalised edition don't have that much stuff as fedora and redhat have.

Don't try to hunt for newest distribution as soon as they release.
Install one distribution learn it well. Upgrade only if it is necessory.

For linux documentation :
http://tldp.org/
Visit this site it has good linux documentation for startup to advance level.
:D
  • geev
  • Newbie
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  • geev
  • Posts: 7
  • Loc: Tanzania

Post 3+ Months Ago

Thanks Pclovers.
i understand to what your talking about.

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