Mandrake Webserver

  • WNxGratefulJed
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I understand that some distributions of Linux are better suited for particular jobs then others. So I was wondering something....is Mandrake Linux good for running a webserver and if not which distribution is.

I already have the discs for Mandrake Linux (they came from a Linux+ cert book). Im just lazy and dont want to download and copy the ISOs onto a disc. :).
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Post 3+ Months Ago

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Post 3+ Months Ago

If your just planning on playing around with a webserver then Mandrake(Mandriva is the latest version) should be fine.

It's probably also a good introduction to using Linux also.

You might want to try FreeBSD, Slackware, Debian, and Gentoo when your planning on building a more serious webserver.

Good luck.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have had some experience with Linux. I had a class at my tech college and we were using SuSe. I know how to move around in the command line and how to get to the man pages so I should be ok. I have also bought a book or two and I have the Acing the Linux+ Cert book from college.

My new computer from ibex comes tomarrow and I cant wait to get started setting up a webserver, or at least a practice one. Heres Ibex's site and so far they look like a great alternative to Dell http://www.ibexpc.com/linuxsystems.html . One of the coolest things about them is that you get the option of not having an OS preinstalled.

Have a lot of fun.

I sure will :)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Anything is a great alternative to Dell... But anyway, under thier Linux Systems section, all they will sell you is a dual boot system if you do pick an OS. So you STILL have to take Windows XP.

I wonder if that's because of MS pressure on resellers about the "computers sold with Linux or no OS eventually turn into pirated Windows computers" thing. Slimey bastages.

But in my experience Mandrake isn't really suited for server applications. The two servers I did try with Mandrake got pulled due to problems with system daemons failing and whatnot after a few hours of running.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I think I saw somewhere on the site where you could get just Linux. I guess their reasoning is that if you knew what Linux was then you would also know that you can get it for free and since people that know what Linux is also know how to install stuff, they thought you could install Linux on your own, not costing them the time to put it on for you. Usually people that want Windows hardly know how to turn a computer on so preinstalled software is a must for those poor souls.

Thanks for telling me this ahead of time and saving me a lot of headachs. My next choice would be SuSe because I already have some experience with it at college. How does SuSe preform as a server? We set up a DNS server with SuSE and played with Apache for about 20 minutes...it was more of an introduction to servers and services, nothing too in depth.


EDIT: I noticed that there is SuSE professional and then theres SuSE Enterprise Edition. Whats the difference and should the professional version be able to run a server as well as the Enterprise edition? Im asking this because I think Novell is charging for the Enterprise edition for the support...at least thats what I think they are charging for.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Professional is for developers to use as a workstation. Enterprise is the server-grade version.

I actually prefer a customized (read: bare-minimum) Fedora or Red Hat Enterprise server. Fedora is a nice distro. Easy to use, and still maintains the server "class" distro. RHEL seems rock-solid, and is probably the most successful and widely used "out-of-the-box" server class distro.

Slackware makes a good server, but takes some heavy configuration. It's goal is to maintain the most UNIX-like Linux distro, and they do a good job (also one of the oldest Linux distros).

Debian is also a big player, but if you're looking for bleeding edge technology look elsewhere. Debian has long development cycles and focuses on being stable over cutting edge. Because of this, they carry older versions of libraries and tools and avoid alpha and beta versions which other distros may thrive on.

Then you get into the BSD systems, which are closer to UNIX than Linux is without having to pay a fortune to own. A lot of admins seem to prefer BSD over Linux.

For a starting admin, I'd try Fedora.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Awesome, thanks for breaking it down for me like that. One last question...how do you know if your computer is i386 or X86 and what do those meen?...the type of processor?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

i386 is the optimization level of the binary. x86 is the architecture of the processor.

i386 binaries are setup to run on Intel compatible 386+, basicly means no optimization was applied. i686 means that when the binary was compiled it was optimized for the Intel compatible 686 processor (Pentium 3/4, since Intel dropped the x86 naming scheme after the 486).

All Intel compatible processors (anything that runs on the PC platform: Intel, AMD) are in the x86 family. Other architectures include PPC (PowerPC) and the newer x64 (64bit processors).

If you run a PC (ie not a Mac or specialty worksation system like SGI), then you will most often deal with i386/x86 binaries.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have an Intel P4...so does that mean that either one is OK.

So what I do is take the ISO and burn it to a CD-ROM disc then boot up my computer and tell the BIOS to boot from disc to install...right?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

a P4 is x86, and will run fine with i386 - i686 binaries. Just keep in the x86 family and you'll be good.

and yes, that's all you need to do. just make sure when you write the CD not to use multisession, it'll screw up some bootloaders.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Never heard of multisession before. When I make a CD (which is very rare) I just click on the My computer icon and dump the files into the icon that has my CD-R drive on it. Then I just click on make CD. Would I need to download some other sort of burner software?

It looks like im asking a Windows question in the Linux forum...will you guys still have mercy on me? :)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Yes, you can't really burn an ISO that way. Even if it did *work* I seriously doubt it would maintain the boot loader information. You need to get some burner software. I believe Alcohol offers a free trial of thier software, and I highly recommend it.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

lol good thing I asked before I wasted 4 discs. Yeah, Alcohol worked like a dream. Only took 3 minutes to burn each disc.

Thank you very much for taking your time with me and getting me started with using Linux :D.

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