practical differences between linux/freeBSD

  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I installed RH9 a while ago as a dual patition with win2K a little while ago and got a bit used to how linux works. However, the grub boot controller (or whatever it's called) went missing :? I think it was a M$ conspiracy. So I continued to use it booting from floppy, and never got round to fixing the. The floppy then got damaged and will no longer work lol.

I'm gonna re-install, because I did a little damage whilst I was playing with that partition anyway, but my question is:

Would it be worth giving FreeBSD a try. Bearing in mind that I am still technically a linux n00b. What are the practical differences between the two and should I carry on with RH for a while before I make the change?

Thanks guys
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • Daemonguy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Well, IMHO it's always worthwhile to try something new; in the case of FreeBSD, new to you but old in the ways of unix-heads.

The longer linux seems to mature, the more it starts to emulate FBSD anyway, so as Sun Tsu once said, "... if you sit by the river long enough, the body of your enemy will float by...". Everything from IPSEC source to the TCP stack are being copied by the linux crews.
If you look at compilations like Gentoo, it even attempts the whole ports collection type thing as well as the concept of building from scratch. The difference being, FBSD has been doing it a lot longer. The core team is not a million people strong either, which, again in my opinion, make the source stronger. Anyone can code and input, but the core folks have the responsibility to graft the work and ensure stability; therein lies the key to FBSD -- stability.
Then there's flexibility, as mentioned previously with the ports collection. You want apache <latest> with ssl? cd /usr/ports/www/apache13-ssl; make install clean. Done. Dependencies are included.

BSD just makes more sense. There are a million and one reasons why i would go with it, however if there is one thing I have learned, it's that people go with what they are comfortable with. ("Comfort" seems to be redefined often).

So, where does that leave us? You asked if you should try it, I say "yes". It never hurts, to try something new.

Cheers.
  • TomCollins
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I agree I have used freeBSD for a while now after useing linux and I gotta tell you after u get it installed and configured you wont have any problems...

It is how ever harder to install then, ohh say redhat and mandrake... But i do beleve easyer to install then slackware... Any way Talk about ease of use after u have it installed u never realy have to install any more software by your self... just fire up there ports system by typeing in the command in the prompt and tell it to serch the internet and u can download almost any file out there for bsd and a lot for linux.... I had divx movies running with full sound the first day and thats something that allways took me a while in linux... But a spent a lot more time trouble shooting the intall then i ever did in linux. But now im pro at install.......
Depending on ur computer tho install could be a breeze! on mine xfree is a pain to configure!

Any way good luck.
  • Tom the Great
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I too, am thinking about trying FreeBSD out, but I have a few questions. Will it run on it's one partition (still need windows...), does it have hardware support as much the average linux distro, and will it run well on a old syatem (180mhz, 64mb ram, a few gigs of space)?

edit: don't sat anytihng about my avatar, it's a long story.. :wink:
  • TomCollins
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Post 3+ Months Ago

well bsd will run on a old system fine but i suggest atleast 128mb but 64 should be fine i guess... You should get atleast 10gb of space for bsd or linux 5gb just to have graffical support for ither.... (might be a little lower but 10gb just to be safe once u get in ur gonna wanna install some more stuff....

It requires its own partition... It willnot install on a logical.. If im wrong correct me this is just my expereance... Its easyer to update / install new stuff on via ports system... It does support a lot of hardware and can use pritty much any linux file out there!
-give it a try
dont let the hard install get u down and be prepaird to possibly have to reinstall a few times... (windows and bsd) this goes for both windows and linux if u are new at it u may need to restart install a few times... and u could wipe out ur windows files by accedent or corrupt parts of ur hdd. But hey all can be fixed!
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

it needs an entire physical drive to itself :? why is a logical partition not enough, or am I having semantic problems here :?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It does not require it's own physical drive -- at one time I had a machine boot to 5 different OS's -- two of them FBSD. You may logically partition a drive - say with partition magic, install your windows (or keep the windows installation you already have), and take the leftover partition making it FBSD. Just make sure you install the Windows partition first -- windows does not play nice with other OS's. ;)

As for requirements, you only need 5MB of RAM to install FBSD, though after the installation, you can remove 1 MB as it runs on 4. :)
I don't suggest you try doing that with an x-window installation. You WILL be quite unhappy. :)

Drive space is conditional as to what you wish to do with it. A sec-logger machine might require a lot more disk space than say a terminal server.
60MB is the required minimum these days.

Hardware support, while it doesn't exactly emulate <insert linux distro here> is at least as good. Better in some places, worse in others. If you have old hardware, there's a real good chance it works -- older equates to more available (and installed) drivers.
My home firewall is one I made myelf from a FBSD box, and it's a p166. :)

Cheers.
  • Vladdrac
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Post 3+ Months Ago

rtm, can you not download a boot disk from somewhere if you do not want to switch?
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Yeah probably, I could also probably make one from the cd. ButI've also done some, uh, "tweaking" with the install itself, and could do with a re-install anyway.

And I've got both sets of install cd's sitting here so I thought I'd just ask before I do anything - which won't be for a while yet anyway....
  • Vladdrac
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Post 3+ Months Ago

makes sense
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Boot Disk? Am I missing something?

You can acquire the iso from the FBSD website, and burn the iso to cd.
After you have completed the re-paritioning (a la partition magic), you boot witht he cd in,, (obviously FROM the cd) and follow the steps. You will see the NTFS partition (or FAT), and the other non-used (or it could be FAT/NTFS) depending.
Choose the second one as your install location for FBSD. The very first thing it will do after you allocate space to the various filesystems required -- use the novice setup as it will allocate for you the first time, or (assuming 10GB of drive sapce for this partition), set it up as, 500M SWAP, 750M /var, 2G / , and the rest to /usr -- is ask about bootmanagers. Choose the default FBSD boot mgr.
It rewrites the boot sector to permit you to choose which parition to boot into.

Done.
Cheers.
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

No at some point I buggered up the grub installer (I think Windows had a conspiracy going on - it would auto boot into win2k) and was booting from the Red Hat 9 boot diskette that I made during install

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