Ubuntu 8 working, want to optimize

  • snail
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have an old emachines running XP Pro. It has 254 MB RAM but when I attempted to install Ubuntu from disk it said I need 256 RAM, asked if I wanted to continue and said some components might not install correctly.
I opted to try out without installing by rebooting. The reboot didn't do it but the third option did.
It took a long time (~15 minutes) but I was in.
I would like to know: how can I optimize things to run more effectively with my given RAM(and processor) constraints?
I don't want to have to download another CD image, but I would do so if this was the only way to get a stripped down version...is there another route? manually removing unnecessaries?

My other question is: If I want to install a program to run while I am using Ubuntu, can I eject the disk(Ubuntu)and insert the disk I wish to install?

Need I "install inside windows" to be able to install a program?

I have been informed that this software is intended for windows only but have heard WINE might be a solution. WINE is a separate utility?
Is there a preferred WINE version for Ubuntu?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • kc0tma
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I don't really understand what you are asking, so I'll give it a shot and see what we can come up with.

Ubuntu should install on 256 of ram, even though you say you have 254 I would venture to guess it is actually a 256MB worth of stick(s). But if it still doesn't like that, then refer to this recent thread for making the gui run smoother on lesser advantaged machines. unix-linux-forum/remove-fedora-t91113.html

Now your second paragraph is where I got confused. Are you using the ubuntu live cd? If so, I can't answer that because I've never tried ejecting a live disk while I was using it, so I'm not sure what it would do. Otherwise, if you did a full hard drive install, then by all means eject that puppy and put it in a safe place, you shouldn't need it very often.

The next part about inside windows confused me too. Are you thinking of doing a virtual machine? If that is the case, 256MB of ram will be disappointing and not perform well.

WINE does work well, but sometimes requires a little bit of jerry rigging to get software to work. If you want to install software for windows, then WINE might be your answer, and I stress the word might. Any version of WINE should work for ubuntu as long as you have the proper dependencies. You can use the apt command to install WINE.

Hopefully I have been at least a little bit of help.
  • snail
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Post 3+ Months Ago

yes, very much help. Thank you.

I am not exactly sure what was meant by "inside windows," but I think it means onto the existing hard drive while in Windows.

This helps me to get started on WINE-ing^^.
I went to the site and was a bit confused about which one to get for Ubuntu(it said the one for Ubuntu 8 is a developmental version -- I want to be able to work with the most tried and true elements before I try the dev versions. It said WINE 1.0 would work with earlier Ubuntu versions.)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I think by what you said, inside windows means to run it as a virtual machine. If you want to keep your windows installation then you could try using vmware in windows to install ubuntu for experimenting. But running virtual machines will eat up your system resources and degrade performance a lot, especially if it is limited to begin with.

With WINE, you'll get mixed opinions. Some people love it, others say it is crap. I personally have never used it, I've just always found suitable equivalents to the windows program I wanted to use.
  • joebert
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I've found Wine to be a good method of transitioning from smaller Windows applications to Linux applications. A temporary fix pretty much untill I find a native Linux alternative or write my own.

If it's a larger more resource demanding application you might want to look into "dual booting". I can't offer any help with that though.

I have a 600Mhz 256MB system running Ubuntu with the default Gnome desktop. I started with the "Server Edition" and added things as I needed them.
My use of the system pretty much consists of a lot of text file editing, command line usage, and compiling. I use applications like Fireworks MX via Wine from time to time, it's not lightning fast but I've used worse. I have a MySQL database server, & Apache web server installed tha I use to test out web sites. When I switch contexts from compiling applications to using the MySQL/Apache servers it takes about 10 seconds to switch everything out but once it does it's really not slow at all.

I also browse the web via Opera on this system.
  • AnarchY SI
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
Need I "install inside windows" to be able to install a program?

you could install the program within windows and then use wine to run it while in ubuntu, however this doesn't always work.
you wouldn't want to eject the livecd you're using to insert another cd. the only time you could do this would be if you had the livecd load into memory but that usually requires @ least 1GB of ram.
i've also found wine to work quite well with the windows applications i wanted to use. the one exception being photoshop >.< i just CAN'T drop it and use gimp.. :/
there is a repository you can install that will automatically get the latest version of wine for you. instructions on how to install it is here. that site also has a good amount of other information on ubuntu-related help topics.
  • snail
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Thanks, Anarch Y SI. I am not sure how to do those "wget -q http://playonlinux.botux.net/pol.gpg -O- | sudo apt-key add -" commands?

Do you bring up a ~command prompt?

Further down the page it mentions TOR. I just would like to comment about TOR: if you don't use encryption it can be used against you. Several government agencies have had their credentials stolen while using TOR(the onion router) as they did not have competent encryption in place(I'm not sure how to determine what is sufficient encryption, but I won't use TOR yet until I'm sure about my encryption.) Of the several sources stating this, one mentioned that the security was at risk because of the browser and recommended using Lynx.

But all that aside, I'll just have to try out this application and see if it works on Ubuntu...
do you know of a software program that reads 23-bit serial input?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

yes, to execute that command you could go to the Applications menu, then in Accessories open the terminal, or you could press alt+F2 which brings up the "run a command" prompt, at which you would enter: gnome-terminal and that would also bring up a terminal. then just copy the command and hit go and voila =] it should work.

i personally do not know of such a program, but i would probably google something like: linux 23 bit serial input
  • suzanne[1]
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Post 3+ Months Ago

To snail - can you please let me know what the 3rd option was that actually let you install? I'm having the same problem you had. Many thanks.
  • snail
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I'll get back on that third option, but I believe that the second choice I enter when booting with the disc in is addressing the installation(whether to install or work from the disc). I believe it is the third option listed here.
-- tired.
  • snail
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Sorry for great delay. My Internets were down.
Upon bootup without liveCD in tray I was prompted to choose the OS: XP Pro or Ubuntu.
I think when I first introduced the computer to the liveCD I chose the ~try out Ubuntu option but it needed to restart. It then put something on the computer -- which I believe may be a partition.
I don't know if changing the boot from order in BIOS will help you if you are stuck. Try putting from CD first when you have the disk in there.

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