I want to go back to windows. Sadly. Ubuntu is a pain.

  • act2040
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I am trying to format the HD so i can put Windows back onto my laptop, there is no Floppy insert, and i don't see an option for formatting, and when i try to do it from start up, i can't find that option. Please help. :cry:
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • spork
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Just boot up with your Windows installation CD. It will give you the option to remove all existing partitions before creating your Windows partition.
  • act2040
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I do that and i push a key during startup, to try to start the Windows Cd...and the screen goes blank, and doesn't do anything, it can sit for hours and do nothing. No loading, just stops. I tried that awhile back, and it seems the computer refuses to do anything.
  • DebianSpiral
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Post 3+ Months Ago

What makes Ubuntu a pain?

I say frag the partitions. If your ubuntu cd works start an install with that and when you get to the partition screen choose to delete the partitions then reboot with your windows CD in. Windows should think it's a fresh drive and allow you to start creating partitions.

If not...guess you aren't going back to windows :D
  • act2040
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Well it takes me 5 hours to fix a problem, and then my computer freezes, and refuses to restart, and i have to start from scratch. I want windows back because it is easier to handle, and plus i'm stressed enough as it is. I can try that when i find my Ubuntu disk again.
  • Janrocks
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Download, burn and boot.. You will find all sorts of partitioning tools on this.

Be careful not to delete any possible partition right at the start of the drive called "system" or "*"

http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/download.html
  • DebianSpiral
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I understand I went through FedoraCore, RedHat, and Suse before I finally settled on Debian. Depending on the laptop linux would provide more problems than windows for a new user, so I understand.

And Janrocks is right, be careful not to delete any of those partitions.

and I hope to see you again soon, when that stress is down and you feel like jumping back into linux. Dual boot is always an option ya know ;-)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It looks like the smaller distros are taking the lead with laptops.

arch, mint and 64studio seem to work far better than the established biggies, with much improved hardware support. It could be that the big fellas get nobbled by the DRM brigade, where the "back street boys" don't care as much.

Really, honestly I would download a few live cd's of the smaller new distros and try them with your hardware. I carry a puppy disk with me at all times.. It's a very good distro with easy to use mount and partitioning tools right there in the gui from the menus.

@debianspiral.. is that spiral as in downwards? from one deb user to another.. doesn't etch suck. How much have they broken?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I was told once (but I'm not sure how true it is) that if you have a linux installation and want to switch to windows, you have to totally low level format your hard drive. Apparently the grub cannot be overwritten by the windows MBR, and since the MBR has to be on the first few sectors of the partition it will not work properly. How accurate this is I don't know, I've just always low level formatted when I am starting over from scratch. There is a good formatting boot floppy called autoclave, but it only works on IDE drives, so you are screwed it you have SATA.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

kc0tma wrote:
I was told once (but I'm not sure how true it is) that if you have a linux installation and want to switch to windows, you have to totally low level format your hard drive. Apparently the grub cannot be overwritten by the windows MBR, and since the MBR has to be on the first few sectors of the partition it will not work properly. How accurate this is I don't know, I've just always low level formatted when I am starting over from scratch. There is a good formatting boot floppy called autoclave, but it only works on IDE drives, so you are screwed it you have SATA.

This is completely false. In fact, if you have a dual boot system, you need not even wipe your Windows installation. Instead, you can download a live CD that has either gparted or qtparted on it (like Mepis) and use that to delete you Linux partitions and expand your Windows partition. Once you're done, you reboot with your Windows install CD, boot into the recovery console, then do "fixmbr" (Here's some info on that)

Then too, you really don't need to replace Grub as Grub will happily load Windows too.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

That's an interesting point raised there with bootloaders.

Installing windows over linux is easy, it's installing linux over linux that causes the most headaches for me. Often I have to resort to killdisk to get rid of leftover config files and odd stuff that causes strange boot problems including but not limited to failure to boot at all, and up to weird screen resolutions and inability to find x11 files.

Windows should be as easy as boot the installer and follow the instructions.. linux can be a pig. ;-)
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I've never actually taken the time or effort to see if that grub thing I mentioned up there ^ is actually true or not. The only times I've ever dual booted anything was with multiple windows installations. I'm working on my first ever slackware installation at home, and I plan on having enough extra space to do a dual boot. Maybe if I have a couple hours with nothing to do I'll try it out.
  • DebianSpiral
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Can't say Janrocks, I went from Sarge to Lenny and lenny loads faster than sarge, sees all my attached usb enclosures without me doing anything and has a nifty gui install interface.

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