WHAT DO THESE MEAN

  • jumenwoke
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Post 3+ Months Ago

[b] I am new to Linux actually now learning it as a Student. Can someone help me with the meaning of these : ext 2, ext 3, NFS, NIS, and RPM also, what Protocols does Linux support?

Your urgent reply will very much be appreciated.

John
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  • d3fac3
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a. SMB (Windows networking)
b. IPX/SPX (Novell networking)
c. Appletalk (Apple/Mac networking)
d. X.25 (OSI networking)

You can search which of the protocol does linux support. search while you learn, dude.

There's a lot of type of ex1, ex2, ex3 and so on, which you do u mean ?
  • Daemonguy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

jumenwoke wrote:
[b] I am new to Linux actually now learning it as a Student. Can someone help me with the meaning of these : ext 2, ext 3, NFS, NIS, and RPM also, what Protocols does Linux support?

Your urgent reply will very much be appreciated.

John


Oh my.

I highly recommend buying a book or two on Linux, if you intend to pick it up. It's just a bit more difficult in a forum such as this to go over every aspect of an operating system, vs. explaining more minute functions within an already understood sub-system.

In any case, the answers are as follows;
ext2, ext3, NFS are different 'file systems'.
ext2 and 3 are the 2nd and 3rd extended filesystem, both created to address certain in adequacies with what at the time was the standard or ext filesystem. This included expanding the capacity for fileset sizes as well as file sizes. I believe support for larger filenames was also incorporated. Ext3 is really a journaling extension to the standard ext2 filesystem. (A method developed with the intention of being able to bring back a system much more quickly and cleanly; recovery improvement .)
The Network File System (NFS) was developed to allow machines to mount a disk partition on a remote machine as if it were on a local hard drive. This allows for fast, seamless sharing of files across a network.
NIS (Network Information System) is a network naming and administration system for smaller networks that was developed by Sun Microsystems. NIS+ is a later version that provides additional security and other facilities. Using NIS, each host client or server computer in the system has knowledge about the entire system. A user at any host can get access to files or applications on any host in the network with a single user identification and password. NIS is similar to the Internet's domain name system (DNS) but somewhat simpler and designed for a smaller network. It's intended for use on local area networks. NIS is often referred to by its original nomenclature of YP (Yellow Pages), which had to be changed due to conflicts with the obvious telecom. It makes use of RPC's or Remote Procedure Calls -- all of which also make systems less secure.
RPM may stand for RedHat Package Manager, which I am guessing for your reference that would be the case. It's a method of installing binary compatible software onto a Linux system. (Several other Linux distributions have adopted and/or utilize the RPM schema as well.)

I am not sure what you mean when you asked about which protocols are supported by Linux. Which protocols do you mean? What exactly do you mean by protocols? Is there something specific you can reference?

Cheers.
  • jumenwoke
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Post 3+ Months Ago

[b] I am new to Linux actually now learning it as a Student. Can someone help me with the meaning of these : ext 2, ext 3, NFS, NIS, and RPM also, what Protocols does Linux support?

Your urgent reply will very much be appreciated.

John
  • jumenwoke
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I am grateful to the guys who replied my last post and I want you all to know that your replies are helpful. Thank you again.

The last question was . What Protocols does Linux support? Just like MAC supports Appletalk and Novell Novelware etc. This is what I mean, which one does Linux support.

Please again, what is HPFS, NTFS4 and NTFS5 are these same system as
Windows NTFS?

Once again I will be very grateful to hear from you soon.

John
  • dyefade
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Daemonguy wrote:
I highly recommend buying a book or two on Linux, if you intend to pick it up. It's just a bit more difficult in a forum such as this to go over every aspect of an operating system, vs. explaining more minute functions within an already understood sub-system.


Exactly... such a specific question at such an early stage of learning... asking in an (unrelated) forum isn't the wisest move.
  • mindcry
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Post 3+ Months Ago

In a blanket response to a general question, linux supports everything. If you are looking for what is the native file server protocol, that would be NFS. Remember google is your friend. Search for HPFS, or whatever else you are looking for.
  • shevegen
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Google is not always the best solution though, but in this case, as it is a rather specific question, you should give it a try. I for example never heard of NTFS4... or what it was again :)
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"I highly recommend buying a book or two on Linux, if you intend to pick it up."

I got my info from forums and websites.
You dont need a book at all.

Mind you though, experience will become your biggest weapon in learning.
If that doesnt help much (well for me it did though), make a local file and store the info , that has helped me quite a lot.
  • mindcry
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Post 3+ Months Ago

AFAIK, there are 2 different versions of NTFS. An NT4 version and an after Windows 2000 version which is bacically NT5. And thats how you get NTFS4 and NTFS5
  • Daemonguy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

shevegen wrote:
"I highly recommend buying a book or two on Linux, if you intend to pick it up."

I got my info from forums and websites.
You dont need a book at all.

Mind you though, experience will become your biggest weapon in learning.
If that doesnt help much (well for me it did though), make a local file and store the info , that has helped me quite a lot.

The desultory method of instruction found on most websites that purport being tutorials may be fine for some, however the tried and true (perhaps "old school") is quite probably better suited for someone who is only beginning the journey. (There are always exceptions to the rule, however online handbooks, such as that found at http://www.freebsd.org are a digital copy of a printed version.)
I am not taking anything away from explanatory websites, or the concept for which they were created. Instead I propose that a better method for someone new is a well organized book which has been through several rounds of editing and developed in such a way as to be classified, "for a beginner". Perhaps a book will start someone new out developing a mindset akin to that of the developer, thereby attempting to create a 'flow' -- which makes things easier to remember.

Or maybe I am just old. :) I like books. I like the feel of them; it's a sort of permanence.

Cheers.
  • Daemonguy
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NFS is Network File System, created by Sun MIcrosystems in the 1980's and even has its own RFC; 1094.
Good god! I have not heard the term HPFS in quite a few years! That was a file system developed my Microsoft for OS/2, version 1.x (can't remember the actual version number).
NTFS is yet another file system developed by MS for it's NT (and newer) OS's. (NT, 2000 and XP use this natively).
It was developed to address several concerns that FAT32, VFAT etc. et al had with long filenames, file access and authentication, large partitions, share drives... the list goes on.
As for NTFS4, 5 etc. ad nauseam are nothing more than different versions of NTFS; commonly 4 was in NT4, while today XP is comprised mostly of v5.

The one question I have for you -- ok 2 questions are, why these questions? What I mean is, how exactly is knowing what all these acronyms stand for going to aid you in learning Linux? My second question is...and I would like to preface it with this statement: Please do not type all in caps for your subject line and be a bit more specific; HELP ME PLEASE is not very descriptive. The question is, why the new thread for the second question?
Just curious.

What do you do again?

OK, that's three. :)
  • dyefade
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Daemonguy wrote:
Or maybe I am just old. :) I like books. I like the feel of them; it's a sort of permanence.


Heh, me too. Most of the info I read these days is online, but for a large amount of reading, having something physical and bound feels nicer. I think that's why ebooks aren't really taking off?
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Post 3+ Months Ago

dyefade wrote:
I think that's why ebooks aren't really taking off?

It could be... it's the tactile sensation of having the book in your hand, turning the page. Eh. Who knows.
Cheers.
  • Balmung
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Post 3+ Months Ago

i really dont get ur question im sry

but wat did u want us to help u with
  • ovidiu
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hello

I think that will be very utile to you to study this tutorial:
http://www.faqs.org/docs/


Ovi
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Post 3+ Months Ago

jumenwoke

Nice to have you at OZZU, and wish you the best in your education, but please don't continue to start multiple topics on basically the same original one -- in essense, your need to learn. Please continue all relevent replies in this thread. Only start a new topic if it is completely different than this one.

Thanks.

P.S. I've merged all your prior topics into this one. They are all relevent.

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