Forms come back blank

  • Timmy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I have a form set up on a website to collect information from potential customers.

Code: [ Select ]
<form action="mailto:bignose@slaphead.com" method="post" enctype="text/plain" name="yearbook" id="yearbook" >


Around 50% of the completed forms come back as completely blank (the email is just blank)

The other half is fine.

Does anyone know why this happens?
Could it be something to do with web browsers or security settings

cheers
  • Anonymous
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • Daemonguy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

More than likely you have fallen victim to HTML 4.0 specifications.
The forms tags were designed to work with a URL NOT command syntax. WHat this means is that some do, and some do not.
Chances are that if you are using some recent version of IE, it would probably work -- good old Uncle Bill knows what's good for us even if we do not.
However, browsers that actually follow the standard as set by RFC, may not. There's really nothing you can do about it, except migrate to a server-side solution such as a simple CGI form-mailer. (Ton's of them all over the net, including one I wrote in 1992 ;) )

Another drawback of using mailto as a POST; security. Lovebug and Melissa love those as they can be easily exploited and used to propagate viruses.

Food for thought. IMHO, I would switch to a CGI-based form-mailer.

Cheers.
  • SharkShark
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Post 3+ Months Ago

My suggestion would be to find a simple PHP mailing script. Check http://www.hotscripts.com.
It is infinently easier and one PHP script can often be used for several forms per site.
  • Timmy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Ahhhhhhhhhhh

Most of the people who use my form work in schools, and a lot of school software is fairly old. They probably have old browsers.

Thanks for the advice, I think i am going to give CGI a shot

Cheers
  • Daemonguy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Keep in mind that to utilize php, it has to be compiled into your webserver application.
Whereas, most every host since the dawn of time has had perl and CGI access.
It just makes using CGI as a form mailer a more simple solution.
Either will work however.

Cheers.
  • Mas Sehguh
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Daemonguy wrote:
Keep in mind that to utilize php, it has to be compiled into your webserver application.
Whereas, most every host since the dawn of time has had perl and CGI access.


PHP is a normal thing for a host to have.

Daemonguy wrote:
It just makes using CGI as a form mailer a more simple solution.


CGI? Every form mailer uses CGI, including ones programmed in PHP.
  • Daemonguy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Sam Hughes wrote:


PHP is a normal thing for a host to have.


I would not consider it "normal" by any stretch of the imagination, with nearly 54 million domains in use on the web, only 16 million of them make use of PHP.
I would also guess that the vast majority of so-called 'free' hosts do not offer PHP as part of their 'free' service either. That's just a wag though.

Sam Hughes wrote:

CGI? Every form mailer uses CGI, including ones programmed in PHP.


Sigh. CGI, at least in old school terminology is represented as Perl (for the most part) , C, Visual Basic etc. These are tools which do not generally offer visual interfaces via the web, and become/require a common gateway interface unto themselves. PHP, I would consider encapsulates it's own interface.
However, the stretch could be made that php is, technically a CGI... I have just never heard of it referred to as such.

Usually when the term CGI is coined, it refers to a CGI written specifically in perl, or more obscurely C.

Cheers.

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