Free web authoring software?

  • manytopsites
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Greetings.

I'm a simple guy with simple tastes & simple needs.

But, I'd like to venture a bit further into the 21st century, and was wondering what (ideally) free or inexpensive tools might be out there to help me, as well as where some quality HowTo's & FAQs might reside.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • RedBMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

My favorite for tutorials is w3schools.com A popular, free, and easy beginner software is the CoffeeCup HTML editor. You can find it here: http://www.coffeecup.com/free-editor/ Hopefully sometime in the future my company will be developing a similar free HTML editor. But until then, I would recommend CoffeeCup. Even though they have made a slight shift towards things like flash (which is not my cup of tea) they still make great products.
  • spork
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Can't go wrong with Notepad.

I personally like to step it up a notch and use Notepad++.
  • RedBMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

spork wrote:
Can't go wrong with Notepad.

I personally like to step it up a notch and use Notepad++.


I doubt a beginner is going to start off hand coding. But as long as we are talking about hand coding. My favorite is Crimson Editor CrimsonEditor.com Its old, but it does the job damn well.
  • spork
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Post 3+ Months Ago

RedBMedia wrote:
I doubt a beginner is going to start off hand coding.

Why's that? Rather than letting a program generate all the markup for him, why not start off with the basics and actually learn things correctly from the beginning? When it comes down to it, the best quality work is done by writing the code/markup by hand. Start developing good practices and habits early on and eliminate any reliance on a particular program.

Bottom line: editors, IDE's, programs, they're all just tools. They're more or less interchangeable. You still need the core skills in order to use them correctly, otherwise they're useless.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

spork wrote:
RedBMedia wrote:
I doubt a beginner is going to start off hand coding.

Why's that? Rather than letting a program generate all the markup for him, why not start off with the basics and actually learn things correctly from the beginning? When it comes down to it, the best quality work is done by writing the code/markup by hand. Start developing good practices and habits early on and eliminate any reliance on a particular program.

Bottom line: editors, IDE's, programs, they're all just tools. They're more or less interchangeable. You still need the core skills in order to use them correctly, otherwise they're useless.


I completely agree with you. I am just saying that the vast majority of beginners don't hand code. I didn't when I started out. Now, that I look back on it that was a mistake. I wasted allot of time with front page and learning the basics to HTML through that, only to discover that my code was non-compliant! <sarcasm>Thanks allot microsoft!</sarcasm>

But yeah, I completely agree, I am just saying that the vast majority don't hand code for what ever reason.
  • spork
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Fair enough, just sounded like you thought it would be a bad idea.

RedBMedia wrote:
<sarcasm>Thanks allot microsoft!</sarcasm>

Shhhhh! They can hear you...
  • Bryce
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Post 3+ Months Ago

So what if Microsoft hears him. They need to fix a lot of their crap. It should be a law to learn to hand code before using a program. I mean, it's not THAT hard to learn -_-. I learned with Notepad2 hand coding every site I ever made. Burn all those crappy tools like Dreamweaver, etc.
  • spork
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Sorry, forgot to close my <joke> tag there. :wink:
  • calvi36
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Post 3+ Months Ago

RedBMedia wrote:
spork wrote:
RedBMedia wrote:
I doubt a beginner is going to start off hand coding.

Why's that? Rather than letting a program generate all the markup for him, why not start off with the basics and actually learn things correctly from the beginning? When it comes down to it, the best quality work is done by writing the code/markup by hand. Start developing good practices and habits early on and eliminate any reliance on a particular program.

Bottom line: editors, IDE's, programs, they're all just tools. They're more or less interchangeable. You still need the core skills in order to use them correctly, otherwise they're useless.


I completely agree with you. I am just saying that the vast majority of beginners don't hand code. I didn't when I started out. Now, that I look back on it that was a mistake. I wasted allot of time with front page and learning the basics to HTML through that, only to discover that my code was non-compliant! <sarcasm>Thanks allot microsoft!</sarcasm>

But yeah, I completely agree, I am just saying that the vast majority don't hand code for what ever reason.


I am a beginner and I bought serif web plus 10. After learning how to use the programs and designing my first site of 64 pages I uploaded it all. Serif in it's wisdom had inserted a ton of corrupt code, I had not hand coded anything as I did not know how to. This program wasted 3 weeks of my life as the whole site went in the bin. I am now learning how to write code, I don't find it that difficult it just takes time and quite a bit of research. I am now at a point, after about 3 months of learning to be able to say that I wish I had learned in the first place rather than going for the easy option of buying a program.
  • Benat
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
I am now at a point, after about 3 months of learning to be able to say that I wish I had learned in the first place rather than going for the easy option of buying a program.


That is exactly why I always insist people wanting to learn web development learn how to read and write code before they use programs such as dreamweaver (these kinds of programs imo, are not made for newbies), so you understand the markup that its generating, therefore you can get rid of the crap you don't need.

I really recommend that you do as many tutorials as you can before you get an "editor"

I really recommend these guys, they are instructor led classes and they are free, and they teach you the very basics of HTML and CSS, it makes it much easier to then venture of on your own when you are looking for tutorials.

http://www.webtechu.com
  • kbergmann
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I personally learned how to hand code first in several languages and then was introduced to editors, this was trus for Visual Basic, HTML, CSS, Java ...

I mix my pages between DreamWeaver and EmEditor. I have learned how to use FrontPage but it wrote terrible code and I had alot of correcting to do, but the previous companies I have worked for wanted MicroSUCKS products. I dealt with it and did alot of hand coding / editing the editor. I have found DreamWeaver to make clean code and quick loading pages.

Overall, without a knowledge of the language no matter what it is, an editor is not as helpful as it may appear.
  • zaiah
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hey here's a nice free one I didn't see above for editing and creating HTML http://nvu.com/ . Kind of like a dummied down version of Dreamweaver. Very user friendly and I think it's pretty powerful. But I'm a newbie so what do I know. Also it's pretty easy to publish your stuff in real time. Unlike Dreamweaver. I still use Dreamweaver however and basic Notepad. Gotta try Notepad+ or Crimson.

Also for your imaging you can use http://gimp.org/ . Not sure about it's slicing capabilities though. But it's pretty useful to be open source. Actually just do a search for open source programs that you are interested in. Some of them are good and some not so good. But I would almost rather go open source or expensive, then cheap. Just my opinion.

I used Dreamweaver first using no CSS and tables. BAD MOVE! Try to learn how to hand code first. That way you can open up a site from anywhere on any computer and make edits if needed. Plus you don't get all that junk code.
  • Hob Bramble
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Post 3+ Months Ago

zaiah wrote:
Hey here's a nice free one I didn't see above for editing and creating HTML http://nvu.com/ .


Just a note - if you go for NVU, keep in mind that it was released in 2005, is rather buggy, and has very little, if any, support available. The project was, for a while, completely abandoned. They are currently developing a new version (Komposer), but there isn't a stable release of it yet, so it's a use at your own risk thing.

When I hand-code, I generally use either just plain Notepad, but sometimes I use ViM (http://www.vim.org/) when I'm really getting into it.

For image editing, I pretty much always use Paint.NET (http://www.getpaint.net/), which is very, extremely easy to use, and has TONS of available plugins to add nifty effects and what not.
  • zaiah
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hob Bramble wrote:
Just a note - if you go for NVU, keep in mind that it was released in 2005, is rather buggy, and has very little, if any, support available. The project was, for a while, completely abandoned. They are currently developing a new version (Komposer), but there isn't a stable release of it yet, so it's a use at your own risk thing.


I didn't know that. My boss wanted me to update the company website and he wouldn't spring for anything. SO I used it. And I do remember it being a little weird at times.
  • George L.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Bryce wrote:
So what if Microsoft hears him. They need to fix a lot of their crap. It should be a law to learn to hand code before using a program. I mean, it's not THAT hard to learn -_-. I learned with Notepad2 hand coding every site I ever made. Burn all those crappy tools like Dreamweaver, etc.

not everybody is a full time web developer. dreamweaver makes us easier to build whatever websites we desire. did u know you can handcode as well using DW?. If you were to do all using handcode, i will say it's unnecessary. i'm not saying it because i'm using it. if you still really can't understand technology advancement then it's very hard. 5 or 10 years from now. you can't be handcoding all your life. It must be used correctly. it is a tool that helps to build better websites.Be it microsoft or DW . they surely do help my business alot. and have my salute
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Bryce wrote:
you can't be handcoding all your life.


I don't know about that - I'll admit programs like Dreamweaver (which I myself use) and it's ilk help ease and speed up development, but the ability to hand-code is still extremely important.

Keep in mind - programs like Dreamweaver were themselves coded, so in the end the ability to code always factors in. You need not start off hand coding (as mentioned many times already in this thread), but if you want to get really serious, you'll need to pick it up eventually.


Another free authoring tool I didn't think of before: Amaya. It takes a bit of getting used to, and isn't the most popular tool around, but it is free, and it's got the W3C backing it - that's gotta count for something.

EDIT: Just fixed a few grammar issues.
  • xfahmix
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It has been quite a while since my last post here in Ozzu. It is good to be back. :)

Anyway, I'm currently using Webuilder from Blumental Software. They have a neat list of CSS property and values so that you don't have to memorize the codes although you still need to know what the codes do. and this is not WYSIWYG editor, hand-coding skills are required!.
  • George L.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Bryce, hot bramble...?. Ok, i agreed with that . Just wanna make some oppinions posted to ensure not many will misunderstand adobe products. I'm not trying to go against you, .

There are 3 designing modes we can use basically, -
1. design view
2. code view
3.split view

of course i discourage anyone who does everything in design view ,which in the end they'll have to double their effort when it comes to coding. In code view, it's similar to when we write codes plainly - in any plain text editor. Split is very helpful when we have other "ajax" - spry thing going on, it help to reduce alot of work and the same time we can learn from the code wiew/split. Some other good feature will be the SQL part when we bind it any between 1 table into our site .html / .php / .asp / coldfusion we can still create pretty much on our own the SQL-part.
Thanks for the recommendation will definitely look into that !.

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