***How much do i charge for creating web-site***

  • enrmpaga
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I'm creating html website for a company, it uses css and some javascript for forms, validation etc.

Its the first time i've have done this and i'm unsure of how much to charge :/

do I evaluate the cost per page? can someone please give some reference on this..
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • philtrated
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It depends on the company. In my experience most web design companies have a starting price of 4 to 5 thousand dollars (which I think is excessive). I land most of my business by pricing my websites well under this standard figure.

I would stay away from charging by the hour. Instead use a fixed price. My basic charging outline is below (Australian dollars)

site design - $200
each page - $100
flash feature - $100

Then for updates to the site I charge by the hour (usually 25 an hour).

hope this helps :)
  • enrmpaga
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Post 3+ Months Ago

you certainly have helped me, thx for the advice..
  • blink182av
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Post 3+ Months Ago

philtrated wrote:
site design - $200
each page - $100
flash feature - $100


I love those prices. Innate Media Group (http://www.innatemediagroup.com/) wanted to charge me 1600 for coding and 1200 for design. The design was VERY simple. The coding did not even include flash or anything fancy, just strait up PHP/Java/CSS/HTML/JS. Overprices sons 'a' bitches.
  • radnor
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Post 3+ Months Ago

$750.00 for the 1st 5 pages
$100.00 each additional page
$50.00/hr maint/changes

On a new site, free maint/changes (up to a point) until client accepts it. Now, if we agree on a site then later, "Oh, add this" or "Change that",... Well, it will cost you because it NOT part of the ORIGINAL agreed to job.
  • NetzzJD
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I agree about not charging on an hourly rate. With my first freelance job, I charged by the hour for everything ($20/hr.) and it got pretty cumbersome for several reasons. I tried to keep a log of the times i worked but that was very tedious as I usually work on designs on/off randomly throughout the day. Also, it didn't take me very long at all to get the design and several pages(about 10) completly done. Which saved the client money but I didnt feel it represented my work at all.

So settle on a particular price point for 5-7 beginning pages and add $ for additional pages as well as advanced coding/flash and such.
  • bradymills
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hi,

I'm relatively new too, and I charge per page.

$105 per HTML page
no additional charge for CSS - because that's all in the game (as far as I'm concerned)

Forms are charged as a page.

Thereafter, I give my clients 30 days to contact me regarding content or design changes (for free) - not including page additions.

Also, make sure you have a contract. You don't run into problems with most large companies, but it's always good to have one. Especially if they are providing photos and content - because you need to cover your butt for copyright reasons.

My contract states the following:
Quote:
Seller warrants that the services shall be delivered free of rightful claim of any third person by way of copyright infringement, and if buyer receives notice of any claim of such infringement, it shall, within 10 days, notify seller of such claim. If buyer fails to forward such notice to seller, it shall be deem to have released seller from this warranty as to such claim. Seller is not liable for any legal action that may arise from design, or any artwork supplied by the buyer"


Also, it's good to include some type of "Excuse for Nonperformance clause:
Quote:
Seller's obligations under this agreement are accepted subject to strickes, labor troubles (including strikes or labor troubles affecting any suppliers of sellers), floods, fires, acts of God, accidents, delays, shortage of cars, contingencies of transportation, and other causes of like or different character beyond the control of seller. Impossibility of performace by reason of legislative, executive, or judicial act of any governmental authority shall excuse performance of or delay in performance of this agreement. If the buyer deviates from the production schedule provided, the finish date will change accordingly.


Of course, there are a bunch of other things that should go in your contract, including payment terms, deposits (I require a 1/2 deposit upon commencement of work) and a 25% kill fee.

In determining your hourly rate, there are some very useful formulas online --
You should look these up... They take into account your overhead, estimated annual hours of work, any additional estimates of set fees, hours you work annually and how much you'd settle to make per year.

Something like this:
Expected Salary + Overhead - Estimate of Yearly set fees / Annual hours you want to work.

There may be more to this formula, and I don't think I have it on me -- but that's how I figured my hourly rate.

Hope this helps... Looks like everyone has given you about the same advice.

Brady
  • iGabe
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I personally started off at the lowest price I could imagine working for, and stuck to it. I got royally ripped off with my first few clients... charged them $65 for full 5-10 page sites, which tooks weeks to complete (and many, many hours).

With each client I gradually raised the price until it reached a level where I was able to pay bills while still being affordable.

This definitely involved a lot of trial and error, but I think it also helped me avoid the common web designer syndrome known as "No Clients." :-)

Hope this helps.
  • Perad
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I believe the pricing should be be worked out on a case by case basis.

(the time you put in + difficulty of site + size of site + any out sourcing etc)

This should be your base... once you have this you should then add a bit more per company based on the following...

What the company can afford and the benefit the site will have to the company

I would charge a small company probably the bare minimum i could to get their business, i will still make money off them but my margins will be small.

If a large company wanted the same site i would increase my charges as it would be visited by more people and the company will probably make a lot more money with it than the smaller company because of their advirtising potential etc.
  • jamestcs2
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Post 3+ Months Ago

The market price in Malaysia for web design is calculated based on per page. The price is about USD 45 - USD 55 per page. For Flash animation ( Flash Intro page about 20 seconds ) the price is about USD 80 - USD 90.
  • Perad
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Post 3+ Months Ago

[quote="jamestcs2"]The market price in Malaysia for web design is calculated based on per page. The price is about USD 45 - USD 55 per page. For Flash animation ( Flash Intro page about 20 seconds ) the price is about USD 80 - USD 90.

Isn't the cost of living much less over there though? If i charged that much per page i would go into the red and lose my home lol.
  • Funny_Fuzz
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Actually, if you're just starting off, and are trying to just make some bucks, then try to keep the prices down, or they may decline your offer and charge. Like me for example. I'm only charging about $100 per web application/system I build, when I could be charging say $500, because I just want to make a little money firstly.

Once you've established a good amount, and have greater experience, "then" you should consider moving up the prices.
  • Vincent
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Post 3+ Months Ago

the thing is, how big/complex are each website you make, and how much time have you put into them?

i reacon that the more complex a website is, the more it should be sold for, for reasonable amount.
  • tastysite
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Post 3+ Months Ago

philtrated wrote:
It depends on the company. In my experience most web design companies have a starting price of 4 to 5 thousand dollars (which I think is excessive). I land most of my business by pricing my websites well under this standard figure.

I would stay away from charging by the hour. Instead use a fixed price. My basic charging outline is below (Australian dollars)

site design - $200
each page - $100
flash feature - $100

Then for updates to the site I charge by the hour (usually 25 an hour).

hope this helps :)


I am starting one to (tastysite) hence the user name any way I have in my pricing layout thing and I say updates ase free! I think for the cost of $25 I would rather have happy customers.
  • seularts
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Post 3+ Months Ago

just do like i do, charge the hole project with one price depending on it's complexity and motivation. and most important ask the client what budget he wants to spend on the project. I take for a xhtml/css site 200$ and higher if he wants programing.. prices can go up as much as 500$ per project.
  • righteous_trespasser
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Post 3+ Months Ago

just a quick note, this thread is over two years old ... some of these figures etc could have changed ...
  • digitalMedia
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Post 3+ Months Ago

...not to mention there's a lot of horrible advice.
  • graphixboy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

tastysite wrote:
I have in my pricing layout thing and I say updates ase free! I think for the cost of $25 I would rather have happy customers.
Your clients might be happy but you wont be when your spending more time making free updates than making money...
  • neksus
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Post 3+ Months Ago

I always talk the client into paying me to code them their own custom CMS. Only takes a few extra hours of work, leaves them happy, and leaves me free of any phone calls/emails telling me to change their content. It's an easy sale once you convince them it will pay itself off in a year.
  • PiotrekXXXXXX
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Hi, I wonder if anybody would know how much should I charge for On-line shopping website for average size shop.
  • joebert
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Quote:
...not to mention there's a lot of horrible advice.


I wonder where everyone who participated in this thread is today. :scratchhead:
  • susanqy2
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Post 3+ Months Ago

oh oh
  • tastysite
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Im just starting out to and this is my pricing list (in £ GBP)

For 1-10 page website

Normal website: £50
Ecommerce (Online shop): £150
User controlled website (like Wikipedia): £400
-----------------------------------------------
Add pagers to:
Normal page £5
Ecommerce page £40
User controlled page £60
-----------------------------------------------
Add-ons
Search FREE
More than one CSS £1 per each CSS after first one which is FREE
Splash page £5 (Not counted in page count)
  • benzetti82
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Post 3+ Months Ago

philtrated wrote:
It depends on the company. In my experience most web design companies have a starting price of 4 to 5 thousand dollars (which I think is excessive). I land most of my business by pricing my websites well under this standard figure.

I would stay away from charging by the hour. Instead use a fixed price. My basic charging outline is below (Australian dollars)

site design - $200
each page - $100
flash feature - $100

Then for updates to the site I charge by the hour (usually 25 an hour).

hope this helps :)


Why do you want to work for free? Rates like that are for bums.

That's a horrible way to price web design. Usually you base your prices on what the client needs... It's a case by case basis. You use an hourly rate to calculate an estimation of hours. Otherwise you're working for free!!! What if I need a complex CSS/ASPX website and I want custom flash menus and items... Man for around $500 you just got yourself 2 months of work. LOL... I charge $60/hourly, but I am a professional. I am a 10yr senior level designer and web team manager. You get what you pay for. You would pay a plumber to fix your sink for around $60/hour so why should web design be any different. It's a service... People think they can do it if they know HTML and download Photoshop... LOL... Yeah and these same people are the ones that go to Home Depot and buy tools to fix their own electric box and die. Seriously...


I know a couple of companies in Denver, CO that charge well over $150/hourly. They hold accounts with big name brands. So to answer your question. It depends on your client, complexity of the site and complexity of the design. If they don't like your prices - let them go somewhere else and get RIPPED... :P
  • mindfullsilence
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Post 3+ Months Ago

my god these are ridiculous prices. These are prices I would expect a teenager in a garage to charge. Not in any way do they convey any confidence in the work the designer does. I charge at least $1500 for a simple html/css website. That if it's a client through the school, so they recieve the student discount. Personal clients, I start around $2000 and go up from there. This covers about a 5 - 8 page website.
  • mk27
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Considering 20% of the planet's population lives on <$1 day US, you might as well charge whatever you want, and whoever wants to can pay you that money.

IMO, no one should recieve $150/hour for anything, inc. brain surgery...this "cost" has nothing to do with anything real. There are countless big, corporate, commercial sites that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more and they still SUCK BIG TIME. Like the aesthetics are bad, the functionality is bad, etc. Go check out verizon -- you could drop a turkey on your keyboard and create a more attractive, more user friendly site, but no doubt they have spent MILLIONS on it. Some bunch of developers are spending half the day sniffing glue and the other half flushing currency down the toilet there.

So if you can find a bunch of high school kids who will do the same thing for $10-20 hour, go for it and be happy.
  • benzetti82
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Post 3+ Months Ago

mk27 wrote:
Considering 20% of the planet's population lives on <$1 day US, you might as well charge whatever you want, and whoever wants to can pay you that money.

IMO, no one should receive $150/hour for anything, inc. brain surgery...this "cost" has nothing to do with anything real. There are countless big, corporate, commercial sites that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or more and they still SUCK BIG TIME. Like the aesthetics are bad, the functionality is bad, etc. Go check out verizon -- you could drop a turkey on your keyboard and create a more attractive, more user friendly site, but no doubt they have spent MILLIONS on it. Some bunch of developers are spending half the day sniffing glue and the other half flushing currency down the toilet there.

So if you can find a bunch of high school kids who will do the same thing for $10-20 hour, go for it and be happy.


Well the problem there is management. Most of these companies have retards managing the Creative and IT departments. They hire people who are cheap and with no skill or sense of direction. Then you have the baby-boomers in there who don't understand what the hell a website is or does or how to build one for that matter, but some how they ended up as the marketing manager. LOL... The bigger the company - the more hands are involved - the uglier the website becomes... I agree the Verizon site is ugly.
  • KSUmark
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Sometimes the most simple sites are the absolute best in my opinion. After-all most sites are for informational purposes anyways, why make it spastic and confusing when HTML/CSS site will do just fine.

You have to look at the economic standpoint of this situation. Is pumping out simple sites for less money better then larger more code intense sites for more? I hardly doubt the margin there for big sites to make it worthwhile for individual website designers....but thats just my 2 cents.
  • graphixboy
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Its all about perceived value and return on an investment.

Its pretty much business 101 to charge what the market will bare. If the average "good" designer/shop is charging $5k for a website then its because the average client is willing to pay in that range. However, if you charge significantly less than the going rate one of two things happen. Either your potential clients who care about getting good quality will worry that your product is sub-par or you will lower society's perceived value of what you do. I can't imagine why any business person would want either of those two things.

You also have to consider the ROI to your potential client. I firmly believe that design/dev/marketing should be priced based on its value to a client instead of the actual labor involved. Lawyers and doctors can charge very high rates because we'd all prefer to stay out of jail and feel healthy. Therefore we're willing to pay more for their services even though the actual effort isn't measured in time/difficulty. If your website is going to save someone money over the next year, generate sales leads, or help sell a product then you should probably charge like it. A client doesn't measure success in emotions (like, pretty, hate) or quality of code (yay it validates) they measure success based on results and thats what a professional prices and delivers.

If its your goal work with horrible clients who are only interested in getting the cheapest thing possible and will treat you like a smart helper monkey than by all means way undercut the market. However you shouldn't expect them to treat you like a professional. On the other hand if its your goal to solve problems, help people/businesses, be an innovator etc than charge a far price (based on market averages) and stop demeaning the entire industry by telling people that a website is worth less than their plasma TV.
  • KSUmark
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Very good point mr. graphix.

I can assure you that this question was not meant to be directed towards fortune 500 companies. I hope it was more for somebody that just wants a 'resume website' or something in which 200 bucks is adequate; that should only take a few hours to complete. I mean, during times like this having a 'resume website' made to stand-out in the giant sea of applicants is not that bad of an idea. But to charge 2K for something like that probably isn't in the cards.

I 100% agree that this industry is and should be about helping the client achieve their goals regardless of what they are.

And please, if you are attempting to charge people. At least apply for a business license, they are cheap and best of all...legal.

PS. Graphix your sites you have made are so gangster, so freakin cool. How did you become that good?!
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