What does it take?

  • kanexpo
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Post 3+ Months Ago

What does it take to become a webpage designer? I really tried hard but i just don't have my own ideas, if i do then i just dont know how to continue.

How can i start my webpage from the scratch? And how can i improve in graphics and design, to be like a proffesional designer?

Thats what i really would like. hope anyone has a good advice.
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Post 3+ Months Ago

  • gsv2com
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Post 3+ Months Ago

It takes time, an idea, and the self-discipline to learn.

First, you need an idea. Nobody is going to go to a purposeless website. It'd be a waste of time to create one.

You've also got to dedicate quite a bit of time into really learning HTML. Most developers only use a relatively few html tags (p, br, ul, li, a, dl, dd, dt, table, td, tr, hr, etc). Learn them. Learn to design using html in the context that it should be used (h1 for headers, not font-size="+5"). After learning html, figure out what you want to do next. If you pick up an interest for programming, learn a scripting language. If you are more concerned with design, become a css freak. Over time, try to learn both.

And at that point, you'll have only scratched the surface... Don't sweat it though. It gets easier and easier the more you try.
  • kanexpo
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Post 3+ Months Ago

yes i learned basic html at school, now learning c++ .. i know some php too but the problem is design. i look at webpages and ask myself HOW IN THE WORLD DID THEY DO THIS SO NICE?? i want to do it myself. but how to start a proffesional webpage? with html i only can do acheap looking frontpage webpage which i dont want.

CSS might be it, do i have to buy a css book? and then study all day and night?
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

By "professional designer", I assume you are talking about someone who can make fantastic looking sites. This takes a lot of raw talent. If you were/are really good at art/design at school, then you've probably got a shot. From then on it's a case of learning the software, finding tutorials, learning techniques.

If you have always sucked at these disiplines no matter how hard you try then you possibly haven't got the raw talent for graphical design. The sad truth for some of us is that you <b>cannot</b> learn talent, so maybe best to work on more of a coding side of things.

If you are somewhere in the middle (where I consider myself to be) then dabble with graphics, but don't expect to create the world's most beautiful website.

If you are looking for influence and are not the most creative person in the world (again, this is me), try to look at other sites to see <b>what works and what doesnt</b>. Do not steal their ideas ,but look at shapes and styles and colors, typography etc. Then forget all that so you don't accidentally do any stealing.

Then look at the world around you. Posters, magazines, buildings, furnature shapes. Anything that you see around you has been designed.

//rest of post scrapped after seeing your reply.
  • gsv2com
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Rtm, everywhere you referred to yourself, I was nodding my head in agreement. I think we're the same.

I hate being stuck in the middle. :) A friend of mine used to say he wanted to be a master of nothing, an expert of everything. Something like that. I think that's a good position to strive for in web-dev.
  • kanexpo
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Post 3+ Months Ago

This is very sad truth - "You cannot learn talent". I really love webpage design and praise and admire other peoples work and dream " I wish i could have done that" Now back to reality, i failed art class last year and I just suck in creativity. I have no talent whatsoever in the ART department.

Very sad. i really hate drawing a picture, but i love making awesome designs on the webpage. does this have a connection?

So what i can do is just be a super coder, and let other people do the front work..which i'd love to do :cry: :cry: :( ..

Not much credit is given to the coder, most credit is given to the DESIGNER, wow ur webpage is awesome - thanks.. but never something like that to a coder.

What to do? Give up? and start something that i am talented with...which is nothing. :?
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

@GSV, lol, the rest of the post was actually pointing out that a professional web desingner needs to be able to do, as well as graphics:

Graphics
HTML / CSS
scripting (both sides)
SEO, marketing, writing copy
people skills
Understand accessibility.
(probably missed something - it's morning)

I don't think you need to be an expert in all of them (I doubt <i>anyone</i> is). But you need to pick your core, learn them well, and then have an <b>good</b> working knowledge of (and repect for) the rest of them.


@Kanexpo: I'm not trying to put you off, and please don't think that you can't do this, but I'm just being realistic. Some people can paint beautiful pictures with <b>no effort at all</b>, some people can create beautiful websites <b>no effort at all</b>, whilst the rest of us have to look on in envy.

You can still create nice-looking websites without them being fantastc, but know your limits. Find your strengths and work with them. My strengths are problem solving and logic, so I focus on making really excellent code.

GSV was saying to me a while back that he has made a niche business "optimising websites". Cutting down on all the wasteful code and giving the clients excellent loading times.

Not everyone wants a super-beautiful site, somtimes nice-looking is good enough.
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

In a rock band, credit is rarely given to the drummer by a casual observer. But the drummer holds the band together - he is the core of the band. Without the drummer, the band will fall apart.

The coder is less cool. The coder is less acknowledged. But an image without code is an image. A website can happily exist without fancy pictures.

Is it enough for you to do a good job and know that you have? Or do you need someone else to tell you that you did a good job?

In addition, aesthetic is personal. One person might love your design whilst others might hate it. Everyone appreciates an optimised page that downloads in a flash, even if they don't openly congratulate the coder.
  • gsv2com
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Post 3+ Months Ago

That's weird. In Japan, if you tell someone you're a programmer, you're likely to hear "sasuga" (so cool). :)

One more note: even if you're not good at art by hand, there is still a chance you may be a gifted digital artist (meaning, doing your art from behinid a computer screen). I suck at pottery, I can't paint worth crap, and my drawings look like doodles. My experience with Adobe Illustrator has always led me to the same conclusion: I suck. Web design is a different story. I was born with a good eye for color and balance. Or at least that's what my mom says. (Just kidding.. sarcasm) There are so many types of art, and I really believe everybody has some form of art in them. They just need to figure out what it is.

Turns out, mine is creating fast as lightning pages with simple designs. I'm not a pro graphics designer, so I capitalize on what I am good at: optimization, rather than what I suck at: graphics.

Anyway, there really is a lot to learn and we're here to help if you have any questions. RTM has a lot of knowledge on CSS, which I recommend you get into early in learning html. He's a good guy to listen to.

Oh, one more thing. Designers might make cool looking websites, but it's the developers that create the features that'll make your site big. Never discredit the "coders". They are the alchemists of our time! :)
  • rtm223
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Post 3+ Months Ago

gsv2com wrote:
Never discredit the "coders". They are the alchemists of our time! :)


yup 'tis true. I'm currnetly working on:

Code: [ Select ]
function alchemy_1($input){
  return "Wine";
}
$product=alchemy_1("Water");
  1. function alchemy_1($input){
  2.   return "Wine";
  3. }
  4. $product=alchemy_1("Water");


and

Code: [ Select ]
function alchemy_2($input){
  return "Gold";
}
$product=alchemy_2("anything");
  1. function alchemy_2($input){
  2.   return "Gold";
  3. }
  4. $product=alchemy_2("anything");


:wink:
  • gsv2com
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Post 3+ Months Ago

You're still working on that? I knocked mine out years ago! :)
  • jlknauff
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Post 3+ Months Ago

Keep practicing. You will get better as time goes on. The more experience you have the faster great ideas will come to you. True, some people are "gifted" but if you are serious about it you can take it to any level you want-it just may take longer.

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